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At the time Second Peter was written, there was not yet a New Testament canon, so the author could not have thought of Paul's epistles as canonical. However, the evidence of 2 Peter 3:15-16 is that he did think of them as 'sacred writings'. According to Strong's Concordance, γραφὰς is used 51 times in the New Testament, always of holy Scripture, so we can ...


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Jesus' answer is in fact the key to the inclusion of the Greeks coming to see Jesus and, indeed, to the whole chapter: John 12:23: And Jesus answered them, saying, The hour is come, that the Son of man should be glorified. Matthew Henry explains that in the close of the foregoing chapter the scribes and Pharisees proclaimed Jesus a traitor to their ...


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Luke's supposed profession would no doubt matter when interpreting his work as an author, if indeed he was the author. As the question says, tradition assigns Luke as author of the gospel that now bears his name and of Acts of the Apostles, but this is only tradition and these books were originally anonymous, remaining so until the second century. If there ...



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