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There are a number of indicators: Themes In the texts in Chapter 11 and earlier, all of the stories are about God's punishment of mankind. While the theme of salvation is present in these texts, there is also a theme of the depravity of mankind and their continual fall from grace. This theme isn't really present in the texts after Chapter 11 - only the ...


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If one discounts the longer or shorter ending of Mark (For why scholars have rejected these endings see this answer.), there are only two explanations for Mark's apparently unresolved ending at 16:8. It was either an accident of history or a purposeful descision on the part of the author. Mark's gospel could have been unfinished due to the death of the ...


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The word 'ἠγέρθη' transliterates into ēgerthē, meaning in its infinitive form 'to rise'. To understand the intended meaning of the word in a specific case we should look both at how the word is used elsewhere in the same work, using a semantic analysis, and at the immediate surrounding context of the narrative, using an informative analysis. Note also that ...


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The Masoretic Text appears to imply (Eccl 1:1) that the author is the son of David, the King of Jerusalem. Based in the wider genre of the Ketuvim (or Writings), the reader would then infer the son of David to be Solomon, the author. In this regard, Jewish tradition reflects the same. For example, the Targum Qohelet makes explicit mention that Solomon was ...


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Note that when it comes to literal versus figurative use of language, it does not matter what the language is. In other words, there is nothing inherent in the Hebrew language versus the English language that helps determine if a word, phrase, or clause should be taken literally or figuratively. Rather, context of a statement, in any language, is primarily ...


2

First, "eternal" is in fact a direct descendent of the Greek word "αἰών" by way of the Latin "aeternus" = "aevum" + "ternus". When you say "eternal", you could also debate on historical grounds whether you are referring to a delimited or unbounded time. Greek is polysemic and "αἰών" is no exception, but in practice, the indefinite sense is quite common for ...


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Many people think the Genesis ages are chosen to be numbers that people could easily remember, and some are. The reason for this is no doubt that many of the traditions that came to be recorded in the Bok of Genesis were initially handed down orally by tradents, who used a variety of techniques to help them remember the stories, including poetry, numbers ...


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Evangelist You, however, be self-controlled in all things, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry. 2 Timothy 4:5. This scripture identifies this gift as that of Evangelist, which is the same gift in Ephesians 4:11. In context of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus (and the work that Paul instructed them to carry out) it is clear we in ...


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The word 'tense' isn't always helpful as Hebrew doesn't have tenses in the same way as English does, often the perfect and imperfect are referred to as aspects. Here the suffix which modifies the verb denotes the perfective aspect of the verb. The perfect aspect views the action of the verb from an external perspective hence we are seeing the action as ...


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King David certainly has a greater role in Jewish tradition, and is more revered in modern Judaism. However, it was King Josiah who introduced religious reforms now known as the Deuteronomistic reforms, including monotheism and the requirement that sacrifices could only be made in the temple in Jerusalem. The Book of Kings (which centuries later was divided ...


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I cannot see any. I'd also like to know why translators thought 'baffle' could be appropriate here. In a loose dynamic translation it's tempting to let it slide. But the same Greek word is used twice in that sentence the only difference being the active vs passive conjugation. ἀνακρίνει verses ἀνακρίνεται (1Co 2:15 BGT) I would translate it in the ...


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2 Tim 3:16 The question assumes that when Paul wrote 2 Tim 3:16 he was only referring to the Old Testament scriptures and whilst that is a view commonly presented it seems to ignore that Paul considered Luke's gospel to be scripture as well, consider 1 Tim 5:18: 1 Timothy 5:18 For the Scripture says, "You shall not muzzle an ox while it treads out the ...


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The Greek word ἠγέρθη simply means that Jesus was 'raised' and, without context, could mean that Jesus was raised in the physical world or taken bodily up into heaven. The context we have in Mark, as originally written (to end at verse 16:9), is that Jesus' body was not there, and he was not seen again. Two chapters earlier, in verse 13:26, Mark's Jesus ...


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The Idea in Brief The meaning here appears to be the inviolate character of the Abrahamic Covenant. That is, the Lord does not violate his own word concerning the eternal perpetuation of the Jewish peoples. Discussion The Targum Jonathan translates this verse in Aramaic as follows. That is, there is the [Abrahamic] Covenant is the object of the Aramaic ...


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Superscripts were added to many of the Old Testament books and psalms by scribes, mostly during the Exilic or post-Exilic period. The superscript to Song of Solomon, "The Song of Songs, which is Solomon’s," only says that it is the best song ("song of songs") that belongs to Solomon. This reference to Solomon could mean that Solomon wrote it or that it was ...



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