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The "two" in some translations is an interpretative addition. It does not exist in the Hebrew of Gen 18:22, which is simply הָֽאֲנָשִׁ֔ים ("the men"). The word "two" is added in those translations for "clarity" (which clarity can inadvertently create confusion, such as evidenced in your question). The idea is added because it is understood by many ...


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The Masoretic Text appears to imply (Eccl 1:1) that the author is the son of David, the King of Jerusalem. Based in the wider genre of the Ketuvim (or Writings), the reader would then infer the son of David to be Solomon, the author. In this regard, Jewish tradition reflects the same. For example, the Targum Qohelet makes explicit mention that Solomon was ...


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If one discounts the longer or shorter ending of Mark (For why scholars have rejected these endings see this answer.), there are only two explanations for Mark's apparently unresolved ending at 16:8. It was either an accident of history or a purposeful descision on the part of the author. Mark's gospel could have been unfinished due to the death of the ...


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Note that when it comes to literal versus figurative use of language, it does not matter what the language is. In other words, there is nothing inherent in the Hebrew language versus the English language that helps determine if a word, phrase, or clause should be taken literally or figuratively. Rather, context of a statement, in any language, is primarily ...


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Short answer: Jesus was referring to the authority Peter would have as an elder in making judgments regarding church discipline; he would be an emissary of the divine court, delivering verdicts that had already been determined in heaven. Matthew 16:19 is an excellent example of why it is crucial to read the text in the original language prior to drawing ...


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The word 'tense' isn't always helpful as Hebrew doesn't have tenses in the same way as English does, often the perfect and imperfect are referred to as aspects. Here the suffix which modifies the verb denotes the perfective aspect of the verb. The perfect aspect views the action of the verb from an external perspective hence we are seeing the action as ...


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King David certainly has a greater role in Jewish tradition, and is more revered in modern Judaism. However, it was King Josiah who introduced religious reforms now known as the Deuteronomistic reforms, including monotheism and the requirement that sacrifices could only be made in the temple in Jerusalem. The Book of Kings (which centuries later was divided ...


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Not entirely sure that there is just one, or even two answers to this conundrum. I have pondered this on many occasions and done some research as well. Some of the answers I have come across are: Anger. Moses got angry and his anger lead him to not follow his instructions properly so I suppose you could say anger resulting in disobedience...? Pride. He ...


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The Bible does not explicitly say "two men" at Gen. 18:22, simply saying "the men" (האנשים). The translators, like the rabbis, infer that two men were there because of the transition at Gen. 19:1 ("And the two angels came to Sodom..."). Rashi, citing the Jewish tradition recorded in the Babylonian Talmud at Bava Metzia 86b) reflects that there were three ...


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The Idea in Brief The meaning here appears to be the inviolate character of the Abrahamic Covenant. That is, the Lord does not violate his own word concerning the eternal perpetuation of the Jewish peoples. Discussion The Targum Jonathan translates this verse in Aramaic as follows. That is, there is the [Abrahamic] Covenant is the object of the Aramaic ...


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Superscripts were added to many of the Old Testament books and psalms by scribes, mostly during the Exilic or post-Exilic period. The superscript to Song of Solomon, "The Song of Songs, which is Solomon’s," only says that it is the best song ("song of songs") that belongs to Solomon. This reference to Solomon could mean that Solomon wrote it or that it was ...


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What we must remember is that this is the 2nd time Moses is addressing the "Rock". God's commandment to Moses was explicit,(Ex. 17:5-6) And the Lord said unto Moses, Go on before the people, and take with thee of the elders of Israel; and thy rod, wherewith thou smotest the river, take in thine hand, and go. 6 Behold, I will stand before thee ...


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Numbers 20:12 gives two reasons: 1) Moses did not believe God and 2) failed to sanctify God. Moses knew striking the rock before had brought forth water and did not believe speaking alone would bring the same results. His attitude and statement "must we" indicate the failure to sanctify God. A parallel would be being baptized into Christ (Galatians 3:27) ...


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The Idea in Brief The two types of tongues are (a) those that are understood, and (b) those that are not understood. When the tongue is understood, the unbeliever will receive the warning concerning the "great things of God," which include the message of forgiveness and impending judgment (Day of the Lord). If the hearer is the believer, the same message ...


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Many people think the Genesis ages are chosen to be numbers that people could easily remember, and some are. The reason for this is no doubt that many of the traditions that came to be recorded in the Bok of Genesis were initially handed down orally by tradents, who used a variety of techniques to help them remember the stories, including poetry, numbers ...



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