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14

Although I disagree with your presupposition that the ages are merely symbolic, I think this is a great question nonetheless. The reason I say this is that regardless of whether the ages are historically significant, we should assume they are literarily significant. The Bible is literature, and each author (or redactor) of each book has crafted his work of ...


8

In two of his books (listed below), John H. Walton examines Genesis 1.1-2.3 according to its similarities to other 'creation myths' in the ancient near east (ANE from here onward), verbal cues with contemporary or related Hebrew scriptures, and so on. He doesn't go much in the way of authorship or the originally intended audience, although possibilities can ...


7

These 3 enigmas or problems can only be solved if fatherhood and childhood (life) are calculated from conception forward. Otherwise the math won't work. The 3 problems above require certain information in order to reach 2 key facts. Then the math issues can be resolved. Who entered and who left the ark? How long did the flood last? (How long was Noah ...


6

When comparing John 20:30-31 to other early Christian texts, it appears 'Christ' and 'son of God' (and 'Lord') were understood as synonyms when used for Jesus. The two terms appear in conjunction somewhat regularly1, a few you have already noted in a comment above. The reason for why the two phrases are so often used in relation to each other probably ...


4

Genesis is different from any other creation story in that it absolutely separates God from his creation with the introduction that 'in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.' As far as I am aware all other creation stories consider the universe as always existing and part of God or emanations of God, or some other confused admixture but not ...


4

Below are charts to help visually facilitate understanding of this enigma in exploration of various solutions: One difficulty that must be addressed is that Genesis 7:6 says, "Noah was six hundred years old when the floodwaters were on the earth." If this is taken chronologically then the phrase in the 600th year of Noah's life cannot refer to the year ...


4

The Hebrew Bible is a treasure trove of truth, and provides the lens through which to understand this passage regarding the Greeks seeking Jesus. First, the triumphal entry into Jerusalem resonated not with the Feast of Passover & Unleavened Bread (springtime), but the Feast of Tabernacles (autumn). That is, when the people took boughs and palm branches ...


4

In Heb 6:4-6, what have those once enlightened “fallen away” from? Here we see a most solemn declaration being set forth by the author of Hebrews; the antithesis of the progress he desired his readers to make. The basic premise is if you are not moving forward, you are dropping back. But such a superficial will not serve our purpose here. What they have ...


4

I may not fully understand your question, and it's difficult to parse what you're seeking, but the evidence would indicate that this story was actually a "stock trope" that Jesus leveraged to teach his audience about how to value people above possessions. In the below answer I attempt to address (Luke's) "authorial intent" in the way that he organized the ...


3

The time Jesus was on earth, specifically during +-3.5years of ministry he was sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel (Matt 15:24). Not that he didn't minister to any gentiles at all, but the Israelites were his primary mission. When you read the passage, the Greeks came to Philip. Instead of simply bringing them to Him, Philip goes and gets Andrew, ...


3

This answer is not exclusive to the creation narrative, but here are some thoughts on how the creation narrative (and other stories in Genesis and Exodus) may fit into the broader literary context and purpose of the Pentateuch. From a broad literary perspective, the creation narrative is the first of a series of stories in the Pentateuch that lay out ...


3

Short Answer: After weighing all of the evidence (both internal and external), it would seem that Mark 16:9-20 was indeed originally part of Mark's Gospel. The ending of Mark's Gospel is one of the major textual problems in the New Testament.1 As noted by the OP, the "problem" is whether the end of Mark (16:9-20) was originally part of Mark's Gospel. ...


3

The phrase "of Scripture" here is intended to distinguish between prophecies belonging to Scripture and prophecies belonging to the false prophets who are excoriated beginning in 2 Peter 2:1. The genitive "of Scripture" can be taken to mean: "prophecy about Scripture" (similar to the form "a prophecy of Jesus' death") "prophecy belonging to Scripture" ...


3

Here are a few proposals. I'll update this post as I learn more, or delete it if a better answer is posted that addresses these points. 1. Chiasmus is a way of structuring a literary unit... if it is not a literary unit, then it is not a chiasm. Given the purpose of chiasmus -- to organize a literary unit, to make the literary unit more memorable, and ...


3

English of the ESV follows fairly well the order and sense of the Hebrew in v.2, but in v.3 has a better (more literally) ordered and rendered form it could take, something like so: v.2 And on the seventh day God finished his work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all his work that he had done. v.3 [my modified ESV translation] So ...


2

"Seeing" chaismus where it does not exist IS a problem, but overreaction to that problem by closing one's eyes to the possibility of chiasmus anywhere is not the solution. As a beginning place to validate validating the existence of genuine literary chaismus in a given passage...see Craig Blomberg's article in the Criswell Journal of Theology on the ...


2

I think there could be many hypothesis: Aramaic was also a language of divine worship and the bible, so using that language could evoke that connection in a way that use of Greek couldn't. Mark evidently wants to preserve this. We know that translating parts of the bible into Aramaic predated Christianity (Philip Alexander Aramaic Bible 17A Canticles: ...


2

Soldarnal's points are spot on. Context is always important in interpreting Scripture, or any other writing for that matter! Peter is surely contrasting true prophecies, on the one hand, and false prophecies on the other. In other words, Peter is contrasting the "cleverly devised tales" of the false prophets vis a vis two things: 1) the eyewitness ...


2

If I were you, I would not fret about such repetitiveness. Even the Psalms are filled with repetition, albeit in a poetic way. In one verse, the author says the same thing twice but with slightly different words. In the Psalms, I guess one purpose of doing this was for ease in memorization. Couplets can be easier to memorize than straight text. I remember ...


2

As to your first question: Is 2 Tim. 1:6 a parallel to 1 Tim. 4:14? That is, do they refer to the same "gift" and the same "laying on of hands" event? According to the several Bibles and commentaries I've examined, yes. As to your second question: What "spiritual gift" is Paul referring to in 1 Tim. 4:14? Ignatius (Epistle to the Ephesians 13, ...


2

Jer. 2:27 Saying to a tree, “You are my father,’ And to a stone, “You gave birth to me.’ For they have turned their back to Me, and not their face. But in the time of their trouble They will say, ‘Arise and save us.’ Jer. 2:28 But where are your gods that you have made for yourselves? Let them arise, If they ...


2

In my research on the use of numerology in Genesis, I found: Shem is given as living 600 years Arphaxad lived 438 years - 35 years before the birth of Salah (11:12) and 403 after (11:13) Salah lived 433 years - 30 years before the birth of Eber and 403 years after (11:14-15). Eber lived 464 years - 34 years before the birth of Peleg and 430 years after ...


2

Short Answer It is a condition that can not actually exist, an absurdity. It is the consequence of an argument presented in the form reductio ad adsurdum, a "reduction to absurdity." In one of its forms, this type of argument takes a set of premises to its logical conclusion and shows the results lead to an absurdity, thus demonstrating the invalidity of ...


2

Are their two different types of “tongues” spoke about in the NT? I believe it would be a misnomer to say that there are two different “types” of tongues. However, there are two separate and distinct “operations” of tongues. The Operation of Tongues The gift of speaking in tongues is seen to operate in two distinct ways: personal and corporate. Though ...


1

What words existed in Greek to express the concept “eternal”? Far and away the most common word for "eternal" in the Greek is αἰώνιος. Of the 68 occurrences of "eternal in the (AV), this word accounts for 63 of those instances. Other Greek words being translated as "eternal" are: ἀΐδιος (found once), and αἰών (found twice) The other two (2) instances ...


1

If you look at the exact wording it is all very simple. Gen 5:32 says that Noah begat Shem, Ham and Japheth at the age of 500 years (Hebrew: “the son of 500 years“). If he begat three sons in the same year he must have had at least two wives at that time, but let us leave that out of consideration. Let us assume that Noah was born on the first day of the ...


1

Lk 1:57, where Elizabeth gives birth, comes after Lk 1:56, where Mary leaves. Though this in itself is not conclusive evidence that Mary left before John was born, it is an indication. Furthermore, Lk 1:58-36 talk about how Elizabeth's neighbors reacted, and how her relatives who had just heard the good news reacted, and how Zachariah reacted - there is ...


1

Noah’s age is not the only detail in the story that gets repeated. In fact many of the points of the story are repeated. The parallels between 7:6 and 7:11 may not be anything specific to Noah’s age. For example, the story repeats: The number of animals taken into the ark (7 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:2f, then 2 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:8f) ...


1

In my opinion, Luke presents the apostles as in the wrong when they took it upon themselves to choose a new apostlefootnote. Thus Acts 1b is important because 1) it establishes a contrast between the pre-Holy Spirit function of the church (it made poor decisions) and the post-Holy Spirit function of the church (Acts 15 - it made good decisions), 2) it ...


1

You seem to be thinking of chiasm as a binary – something that is either there or not there. In reality there is a spectrum of chiasms that exist in the Bible on the scale of a single verse or an entire book. Imagine you're a literary theorist looking at poetry written in English. Your method shouldn't be to take two random lines from a random poem and ask: ...



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