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A theological answer would indicate that Rabbinic Jewish and early Christian thinkers did not attribute bodily form or sex to God, though most attributed male gender owing to the preponderance of typically masculine imagery and grammatical forms for God they saw in the Bible. Growing gender awareness has challenged traditional assumptions, and most Jewish ...


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What these verses imply is that, whatever “image of God” implies, sex is irrelevant. In the Jewish view, since God has no physical form at all, it is meaningless to speak of His sex. The various Hebrew words that translate as “God” all have masculine grammatical gender. (The word for “spirit”, ruach, has feminine gender though, so the “spirit of God” which “...


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The question is actually great. It prompts us to see John 17:3 in light of exegetical analysis. John 17:3 And this is eternal life, that they know you the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent. John 17:3 is explicit that eternal life is knowing both the Father and the Son. Eternal Life is neither only the Father nor only the Son but ...


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The New American Bible, in note 4 to 2 Kings chapter 3, does initially attribute this triumph to the god Chemosh. However, the New American Bible then suggests an alternative, monotheistic explanation, which inevitably recognises the polytheistic beliefs of the early Israelites and their belief in the efficacy of child sacrifice: The wrath against ...


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A Puritan Answer This answer is an attempt at an exposition of a comment that Richard Sibbes makes in his book Josiah's Reformation: God doth always hear, though he seemeth not to hear sometimes, to increase our importunity. Christ heard the woman of Canaan at first; but yet, to increase her importunity, he gave her the repulse and denial, and with the ...


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In context, Paul is talking about Christ crucified (1:23), i.e. a submission to shameful death which surely looked too "weak" to be the activity of God. And yet this "weakness" is stronger than men's strength, because through it God conquered sin and death.


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There are many ways to determine the quantity of occurrences of a particular phrase in the Bible. The way I often do it is: Go to www.blueletterbible.org. You will see a box under "Bible Dictionary/ Search." Within quotes, type in the word or phrase you would like to search for. For example: "God of Israel." This will yield results for that exact phrase. ...


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It is because the gentile woman addresses Jesus as the Son of David. David was a shepherd who became the great king of Israel. Jesus as the Son of David indicates His being a shepherd and also king of Israel. As the Son of David, the shepherd and king of Israel, Jesus can't help this gentile woman. This title is reserved only for the Israelites as seen in ...


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I also think (as in the previous comment) that it is meaningless to speak of the gender of God And it is unwise, in many cases, to try and equate grammatical gender with actual gender. The word for "spirit" is grammatically feminine in the Hebrew, and grammatically neuter in the Greek, but this tells us nothing at all about the actual gender of the Holy ...


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The seed in the parable is the word of God, that is, the message. Compare this parable to the Parable of the Sower which occurs immediately above this parable in the same chapter (Matthew 13) and includes an explanation of the parable. Matt 13:3-4 And he spake many things unto them in parables, saying, Behold, a sower went forth to sow; And when he sowed,...


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The Lord tests the righteousness for sin, which he (the Lord) hates. That is, the wickedness of the righteous is in view according to Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi). Please click the image below in order to enlarge. In this precise regard, the following graph depicts both the musical and logical division of phrases in the Masoretic Text. Please click the ...


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Gen 18:1 would indicate that this is a theophany. Genesis 18:1 Then the LORD (יהוה)appeared to him by the terebinth trees of Mamre, as he was sitting in the tent door in the heat of the day. יהוה is Yahweh (Jehovah) see for example: יְהֹוָה Jehovah, pr. name of the supreme God (הָאֱלֹהִים) amongst the Hebrews. [Gesenius, W., & ...


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The context is that Miriam and Aaron were gossiping about Moses. God intervenes and tells them that unlike other prophets, including Miriam and Aaron, to whom he speaks via dreams, God speaks to Moses while he is awake and they have entire conversations. Of course, he does not literally speak with him face to face, as God does not have such a face that a ...


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The Douay-Rheims Bible - slightly older than the KJV, renders the passage as such: 2Ki 3:27 Then he took his eldest son, that should have reigned in his stead, and offered him for a burnt offering upon the wall: and there was great indignation in Israel, and presently they departed from him, and returned into their own country. It may seem odd to say ...


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The Hebrew text does not contain a word that must be translated "divine", but instead "גָּד֥וֹל", which is often translated as "great", for example in Genesis 4:13. My punishment is too great to bear! The sacrifice of the King's heir caused an outburst of great anger from the Moabite soldiers who fought fiercely due to the King's sacrifice and drove ...


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Manuscripts p66 and p75, and codices Vaticanus, Sinaiticus, and Alexandrianus at John 4:24a show the Greek wording ΠΝΕΥΜΑΟΘΕΟΣ (πνευμα ο θεος / spirit the supreme deity) in full or abbreviated form. And since there's no indefinite article ("a") in biblical Greek (and of the English language renderings you cited), the NASB and NIV renderings in English are ...



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