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11

Enuma Elish and Genesis have the strongest connection in their first lines--"In the beginning" vs. "When on high." Some say that Genesis is written as a polemic against Enuma Elish. They are very different. 1a. Enuma Elish starts with the elemental representatives of chaos, Apsu and Tiamat. They are the father and mother of the gods respectively. It ...


10

Who are the morning stars? From the text, I would say the morning stars are the sons of God that are mentioned. This passage seemed to follow a common parallel format found in the surrounding text. Look at the repetitious nature of the surrounding passages for my reasoning: 5 Who determined its measurements—surely you know! Or who stretched the line ...


8

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


6

Being awed and inspired by the world's beauty is not the same thing as a teleological argument. In Psalm 19, the psalmist captures the experience of wonder, a core component of the religious experience and offers an awareness of God's manifestation in the physical world (all translations are by Robert Alter): The heaven's tell God's glory, and his ...


6

It's not implying that we'll become actual stars, but that we will become like stars. That "those who are wise shall shine like the brightness of the sky above". This brings to mind the radiance of God that we saw shining around Moses after he came down from Mount Sinai: Exodus 34:29 (NIV) When Moses came down from Mount Sinai with the two tablets of ...


6

Two viable and not necessary mutually exclusive interpretations can be offered which result in the same theological conclusion. Sky, Space, Heaven I heard R.C. Sproul suggest that first heaven would denote the sky, second heaven deep space, and third heaven the presence of God. Ted Donnelly takes this interpretation in his book Biblical Teachings on the ...


6

Alfred Edersheim, on Page 1135 of his book, The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, writes: It could not have been an eclipse, since it was the time of full moon; nor can we place reliance on the later reports on this subject of ecclesiastical writers. It seems only in accordance with the Evangelic narrative to regard the occurrence of the event as ...


6

NASA interprets the passage: ...tells of an "accidental" sundial, in which the number of steps covered by the Sun's shadow on a staircase was used to measure the passage of time. In that story, the shadow miraculously retreated ten steps on the staircase built by King Ahaz. The word translated "steps" also is translated as "degrees" (likely ...


6

As evocative as the phrase is, the context excludes an astronomical interpretation. The poetry of the Psalms comes largely from use of repetition and parallelism. A psalmist often repeats the same idea in two or more phrasings in order to solidify what they are speaking of. In this psalm, we see: "God reigns over the nations" "The princes of the ...


4

In classic Greek, the word has an astounding variety of meaning: I. in a form of sun-dial, the shadow of the gnomon, the length of which in feet indicated the time of day... II. element 1. a simple sound of speech, as the first component of the syllable... 2. in Physics, στοιχεῖα were the components into which matter is ultimately divisible, ...


4

I cannot provide the exact cultural implications at the moment, but the third heaven has traditionally been taken as "into the very presence of God." This certainly was the position advocated by Aquinas as well as Augustine.


3

I know that this is an old topic, but for what it's worth, there may be some credibility to taking Paul's meaning to include "heavenly bodies." The Galatians were migrant Gauls, or Celts, whose primary religion was Druidism, which was a form of animism. In Galatians 4:8, Paul says "Formerly... you did not know God, you were enslaved to those that by nature ...


3

The simple meaning ("pshat") of the oral tradition is "They were unfaithful to the LORD and the resulting births were illegitimate. They will be consumed in a single month, together with their possessions". So what's the problem? It starts with "chodesh", which can mean "month" referring to some particular month such as next month, or the month of tamuz ...


3

The rabbis of the talmud, recording received oral tradition, appear to understand God to have arranged the stars into their constellations. The following passage from Tractate B'rachot 58b (in the Babylonian talmud) comments on the passages brought in this question (among others): Samuel contrasted two texts. It is written, Who maketh the Bear, Orion, ...


3

In Gen 15:5 God promises Avram that his seed shall be as numerous as the stars. It doesn't say "his seed living at any one time"; the straightforward reading is that it means all of them. The 603,550 men counted in the desert census (Num 1:46) are from but one generation. Since descendants of Avraham continue to be born to this day, we have not yet ...


3

Although Niobius' answer is good, it misses a bit of the point. G-d gives a childless Avram two metaphors to understand (a) that he would have a lot of progeny, and (b) that they had both tremendous potential to achieve great heights and also to suffer great lows. First, let me give you a fascinating look into how the Jewish Midrashic tales from the Torah ...


2

Astrology as in the belief that the heavenly bodies control our fate is condemned in the Bible. But there's also astronomy, which is the science used to create calendars. The Sun and the Moon are for times and seasons and a good calendar takes both into account. Months, even today, are based loosely on the lunar cycles. The lunar cycle takes about 29.5 ...


2

The word which the NIV translates as "constellations" is מַזָּרֹות; the KJV, like other traditional versions, keeps the Hebrew word as a proper name (Mazzaroth).This word occurs only here and its meaning is not known. "Constellation" is just a guess.


2

I think the wording of the text draws our minds to ponder the beauty and arrangement of the stars and the power of God who put them in their place.  Back in the days before electricity, the heavens would have been the most fascinating movie theatre to watch and it is no surprise that ancient philosophers identified the idea of God/gods with them and paid ...


1

The ancient Hebrew calendar was based on the cycle of the moon. Passover happened at the 14th of Nissan. Since we know that 1 Nissan would have been a new moon (required for a total eclipse), we know that the moon would have been waxing and nearly full on the 14th. This makes a natural total solar eclipse impossible. That said, it says nothing of a ...


1

The morning stars (more than one) sung together implying they were a group or a choir, a soloist doesn't sing together, they just sing. The sons of God shouted, didn't say they sung. Maybe the morning stars was the heavenly choir and "The morning star" was the choir director, at first Lucifer (Isaiah 14:12) but he fell and now it is Jesus (Revelation ...



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