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This answer adds some supplementary material to the fine answer already posted. Sebastian Brock records particular comment on his preferred form of maranatha in the preface to the collection of his essays, Fire from Heaven: Studies in Syriac Theology and Liturgy (Ashgate, 2006), p. vi: Invocations of the Holy Spirit are found in all liturgical ...


9

The Didache includes Maranatha in its prescribed post-Eucharistic prayer: Didache 10.6 (Schaff) 'Let grace come, and let this world pass away. Hosanna to the God of David. If any one is holy let him come, if any one is not holy let him repent. Maranatha. Amen.' This is a clearly eschatological context. The epilogue of the Revelation actually says ...


0

As background to the cultural milieu of ancient Israel/Judah and the post-exilic biblical books, Aramaic was the language of administration for the Neo-Assyrian (911-605 BCE), Neo-Babylonian (605-539 BCE) and Persian/Achaemenid (539-323 BCE) empires, all of which ruled and/or occupied Israel/Judah at some point. Aramaic became the day-to-day language of ...


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I am of the opinion that Jesus spoke any language He desired, or that was needed to converse with people He was talking to at the time.. Probably, however he spoke Greek for the most part, as that was the most common language in use at the time. However, His first words from the Cross were used for a special purpose. Those Words are of course, also the ...


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Please allow me offer an answer that is different than you may have heard, but goes beyond what we can see outwardly and requires faith to see many things together from the "new" and the "old" as one. Have you noticed the following? In Daniel 2:1, exactly who had the dreams? Now in the second year of the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuchadnezzar ...



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