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16

The Hebrew words in question are עזר כנגדו (ezer kenegdo). The Hebrew root עזר means “help” and the word kenegdo comes from the root word נגד (neged). Neged in the OT always means "opposite" or "across from" and negdo means across from him. In Exodus 19:2, Israel encamp neged hahar, opposite to Mount Sinai. The form kenegedo doesn't appear anywhere else ...


13

The Hebrew says: וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה, לֹא-יָדוֹן רוּחִי בָאָדָם לְעֹלָם, בְּשַׁגַּם, הוּא בָשָׂר; וְהָיוּ יָמָיו, מֵאָה וְעֶשְׂרִים שָׁנָה. My literal translation of the last clause: His days will be one hundred and twenty years. It doesn't explicitly say "no more than", but it also does not say—and history does not bear out—"exactly". ...


11

The word "nephilim" as used in Gen 6:4 and Num 13:33 is simply an anglocizing of the Hebrew word nephiyl. If it were to be translated it would be simply "the fallen". this opens up a whole new hermeneutical question about how then should we interpret these people described both before the flood in Gen 6 as "the fallen" and then again after the flood when ...


10

Simply put, we don't know for sure, but we have clues! We have three known facts about the Nephilim: Their Name The world "nephilim" comes from the Hebrew word nephiyl, which means "the fallen". What did they fall from? The Bible isn't clear about that. It's possible that they fell from the sky (making them aliens) or from heaven (making them ...


5

As for why the KJV used the term "meet", the Old English adjective form means "proper", "suitable" or "precisely adapted to". See the definitions on Dictionary.com, Merriam-Webster.com and TheFreeDictionary.com. I think that in some cases people have reacted to this rather strongly (and unnecessarily) because of the passing resemblance to "meat" - See, God ...


3

To add to Ami's answer... Genesis 1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. No other creature was created in God's image - in the context of the creation account here in Genesis 1, we can infer the nature of mankind is more like God than any other created thing. It follows that, ...


3

The word that is translated as "God" in the phrase "Sons of God" can also mean can also mean leaders, judges, dictators etc. It is also possible that the Nefilim and the "Sons of ..." are two different, but possibly connected groups. When the Nefilim were present, such and such happened. The word Nefilim also means miscarried or aborted fetuses. Some ...


3

Long Hebrew names are made up of smaller words. The two-letter subroot 'Meth' means death. I believe Hirsh interprets the dead to be the 'ignoble masses' rather than unpack it from the name. Strong sometimes interprets it to mean 'man' but most of the time in translation it is referring to a 'few men' and often to a few men who were doomed, or apparently ...


2

That passage is referencing how long man has before the flood is going to happen. God proclaims that he will do the flood and that he'll tell Noah to build the ark. This is how long from the time He pronounces this to the time it will actually happen. It really has nothing to do with lifespans. Psalm 90:10 references lifespans around 70 to 80 years on ...


2

Some passages in the Bible are difficult to understand, and have been taken many ways. This is one of them. No matter how we interpret this passage, we must make sure not to be dogmatic about the resulting theology. If we conclude that this passages is likely talking about aliens, we must be careful not to conclude, "therefore the Bible teaches that ...


1

Please refer to this answer to find out where does these nephilim come from, who were their fathers... Such a conclusion makes sense when we recognize that "the son of the true God" mentioned at Genesis 6:2, 4 were angels who materialized bodies and committed immorality with women. Those women give birth to many different anomalies, which were then called ...


1

The Nephilim were the result of the intermarriage between the priestly people and the rebellious kings. The text gives us a split genealogy after the murder of Abel, priests serving God outside the garden, and Cain's false kingdom (he went and built a "fortress"). The sin of the sons "of God" (God was their authority) was marrying daughters "of men" (man as ...


1

NEPHILIM (Neph´i·lim) <Fellers; Those Who Cause [Others] to Fall Down>. This is a transliteration of the Hebrew word nephi·lim´, plural in its three occurrences in the Bible. (Ge 6:4; Nu 13:33 [twice]) It evidently stems from the causative form of the Hebrew verb na·phal´ (fall) as found, for example, in 2 Kings 3:19; 19:7. The Bible account describing ...



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