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10

History The Hebrew and Greek terms for 'messenger' do have this natural overlap, and can cause contention in translation. The Latin Vulgate was the first translation which tried to separate the word into divine and human, by transliterating the Greek term αγγελος to create the Latin angelus for divine messengers, and 'translating' it properly for human ...


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In Exo. 12:12-13, it is written, 12 For I will pass through the land of Egypt this night, and I will smite all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast, and I will execute judgment against all the gods of Egypt. I am Yahveh. 13 And the blood shall be your sign upon the houses where you are. And when I see the blood, then I will [...


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Just because the text identifies the angels doesn't mean that the human characters had that knowledge, or at least not initially. The Biblical instances which would be commonly understood to be times when people were unaware they were entertaining angels are: Abraham in Genesis 18 Lot in Genesis 19 Gideon in Judges 6 Samson's parents in Judges 13


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The answer to your question would seem quite simple. Since Job 4:1 identifies the speaker whose statement is found at Job 4:18, as Eliphaz: Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said, and Job 15:1 identifies the speaker whose statement appears at job 15:15, as the same: Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite, and said, and God says to that man at ...


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While not stated directly, the Sabbath is evidence that holy ground first occurred during creation. The Sabbath is holy to God's people and it is holy to the LORD: And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak also to the children of Israel, saying: ‘Surely My Sabbaths you shall keep, for it is a sign between Me and you throughout your generations, that ...


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Yes, Jesus is saying that children have "guardian angels". But not just children, also adults who humble themselves as "little ones". Jesus' message here is that it's better for a man to drown himself or be drowned by someone else in the sea, than it is for a man to offend anyone who believes in him. Matthew 18:6 (KJV) 6 But whoso shall offend one of ...


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In the context of Genesis 48 The word "Angel" in Genesis 48:16 (KJV) is the Hebrew word הַמַּלְאָךְ֙ (ham-mal-’āḵ). This particular form of the Hebrew root מַלְאָךְ (mal-’aḵ) is found 23 times in the KJV, but only in this instance does it have a capital letter. I'm not an expert in the Hebrew language, but I'm pretty sure there isn't anything special about ...


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You are right in saying both Hebrew and Greek words just mean "messenger". The English word "angel" is transliterated from αγγελος. All passages containing "messenger" make most sense when looking see what the actual "message" is that is being brought by the "messenger". The message is more important that the one who brings it. Related Strongs Numbers ...


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The ESV, NASB, et al aren't wrong per se, since βραχυ can include a reference to time. Thayer's definition: short, small, little of place, a short distance, a little of time, a short time, for a little while Basically the ESV is doing a very slight but extremely justifiable interpretation for this verse. 5 For it was not to ...



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