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9

The relevant bit of Daniel 10:3 reads as follows: ... וְהִנֵּה מִיכָאֵל אַחַד הַשָּׂרִים הָרִאשֹׁנִים בָּא לְעָזְרֵנִי ... ... but, behold, Michael, one of the chief princes, came to help me ... OP has two intertwining interests: (1) the primary question is about the meaning here of "one" in Hebrew; but secondarily (2) how does this relate to the ...


8

In Hebrew אחד is a cardinal number. The names of the days of the week are formed from cardinal numbers, so what we call “Sunday” is “day one” in Hebrew, and thus also in the Greek and Latin Bibles, but the English translators render this as “the first day”, only because this sounds more natural in English. But אחד does not actually ever mean “first”. The ...


7

Because Jacob encountered God (YHWH) that Night The Meaning of Face to Face The phrase "face to face" in the Hebrew (פָּנִ֣ים אֶל־פָּנִ֔ים) uses the plural form of the word פָּנֶה (paneh; "face").1 However, it would not necessarily be proper to translate it then "faces to faces," because the word is always found in the plural form in Hebrew.2 This is ...


6

The angels mentioned earlier in 2 Peter are evil1 Angels are only explicitly mentioned twice in 2 Peter. The other mention is near the start of the same logical section in verse 4: 4For if God did not spare angels when they sinned, but cast them into hell and committed them to chains of gloomy darkness to be kept until the judgment; ESV If these ...


5

There are three common views on the identity of the 'sons of God' marrying the 'daughters of men' in Genesis 6.1-4: Descendants of Seth married descendants of Cain Nobles married commoners Angels married human women 1. Descendants of Seth married descendants of Cain This view was popularized by Augustine (City of God, chapter 23), and the argument ...


5

A Contrary Argument: Seeing the Reference as to Good Angels Jack Douglas laid out some good points to argue for 1 Pet 2:11 to be evil angels. However, I do find some holes and things left unconsidered that for me seem to point to a contrary conclusion. The following is loosely based off both his original set of arguments offered, as well as some of his ...


3

The first thing we need to understand is that the Hebrew word מַלְאָךְ (mal'akh) literally means "messenger." It can refer to human messengers (Hag. 1:13) as well as spiritual messengers (Gen. 22:11; the latter is what we commonly refer to as "angels"). A related noun מַלְאָכוּת (mal'akhut) derived from the same triliteral root מל"ך means "message" (Hag. ...


3

The issue of interpreting the Revelation is very difficult. A book like Proverbs is relatively straight forward; most readers agree on the genre, how it was intended to be read, and how it was intended to be applied. The same can't be said for the Revelation, because interpretations and applications have varied so radically over the centuries, let alone just ...


3

In Greek thought, there was even a specific term for showing hospitality to a guest: xenia (ξενία). If a host harmed his guest, Zeus would avenge them. This went both ways, too. In Homer's epic The Odyssey, book 21, we are told the major sin of the suitors is that they abused hospitality. In the Assyrian Words of Ahiqar, Ahiqar provides hospitality to a man ...


3

Divine agency In many Ancient Near Eastern cultures, there was a political concept we call 'agency'. In this, the delegate or ambassador of a god simply spoke in the first person on that god's behalf. The use of agency is only touched on rarely in the broader historical narrative of Genesis–2 Kings, where we sometimes find the Messenger of YHWH speaking ...


3

The new testament ἄγγελος can mean messenger. For example, in Revelation Jesus says to the angel of the church of xxx write. This can mean either write this to the pastor or a guardian angel over the church. So here when it says The Law was instituted through the work of angels, could it possible mean the work of prophets? Clearly it was administered ...


2

It's hard to determine why "on the right" might be used in this citing (with angels possibly not lacking "authority or honour”). At the same time Jesus probably didn't need more honor while in heaven; he sat on the right hand of God. Mark 16:19 (KJV) So then after the Lord had spoken unto them, he was received up into heaven, and sat on the right hand ...


2

אחד in most cases matches our cardinal number one, but there are also instances where first fits better (e.g. Ez.40.2 in the first (ראשון) month on the first (אחד) day. Biblical Hebrew words never match 100% with one single English expression. You find the reference in Brown-Driver-Briggs, page 25, especially in paragraph nr. 7. But keep in mind, even ...


1

The first part of the term "Bene Ha'elohim" simply means sons of. Therefore, the question really revolves around what "elohim" refers to here. There are a couple of things that elohim can refer to. In the Bible, it is typically used to refer to Yahewh (god,) however elohim can also refer to gods; the mighty, great or powerful (so, lords or aristocracy); or ...


1

Unfortunately, the confusion arises only as a result of the pre-existing theological position in the source material. The article you linked to is trying to prove that the archangel Michael is Jesus, which is why it introduces this translation error, for it to then be able to appeal to it as an argument to support its claim. As many have already pointed ...


1

The right side of the altar of incense puts the angel on the same side as the table of showbread. Here's a discussion of the TOS from the-tabernacle-place.com: “'Showbread' also was called “bread of the presence” because it was to be always in the Lord’s presence. The table and the bread were a picture of God’s willingness to fellowship and communion ...


1

What is the significance of the angel being on the right side of the alter of incense in Luke 1:11? We must assume (I know that is a banned word here) that Zechariah was standing facing the altar and, also, the Holy of Holies. If that position is allowed, the significance would be that the angel was not standing between Zechariah and the entrance to ...


1

The same word in Hebrew "yada" means "To Know", but the Context tells us that "To Know" means to have sexual intercourse-with or without permission. In Gen. 4:1, Adam "yada" his wife, and she conceived. You don't get 'conception' by cognitive knowledge-something else had to happen. In Jdgs 19:22-26, we see a simular passage as Gen. 19:4-8, but in this ...



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