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Jewish translations make no distinction between the two verses. Rashi looks at the Amos 3:6 in context with the verses before and after 3:6, pointing out that the roar of the lion, mentioned in verses 4 and 8, is the warning from the prophets. The prophets would prophesize a threat of evil -- i.e. Divine Retribution -- unless there is repentence. So, ...


2

While I am almost persuaded by the suggestion that the "day" of Amos 8:9 could be 2 August, 2027 -- which I note will be a Bank holiday in Scotland (significant?)1 -- I do believe there is a different, "real" answer to this question, of a sort. tl;dr : My sense is that the "day" described in Amos 8:9 is the same "day" as described in Amos 5:18 (so, for the ...


2

It is almost too easy of a question. As Amos "sees" the word of the Lord, there is a chronology throughout the vision. The condemnations pronounced are not only directed toward Israel, but also to her enemies. In all the judgment statements throughout the prophets, we find this statement, "In that day..." over 100 times. The chronology is simple. 1. God ...


2

I'd like to add the words of Philo, who lived in the 1st century A.D. In Concerning Noah's Work as a Planter (De Plantatione), Ch. XXV, Sec. 107-108, Philo writes, 107 For some persons have fancied the sacrificing of oxen to be piety, and they assign a portion of all that they steal or obtain by denials, or by cheating their creditors, or by plundering, ...


2

My wife summarizes it well: "Sometimes, saying 'sorry' is not enough"; i.e. you have to mean it. In the long list of increasing punishments that the Jews could receive if they should reject G-d's statutes (Lev. 26:14-41) even confessing one's sins, and those of one's father, will not be enough, causing G-d to work on behalf of the enemies of the Jews. ...



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