Hot answers tagged

7

The general suggestion I have seen for this change is that Stephen (or the author of Acts) has conflated Assyria's conquest of Israel in 722 BC with Babylon's conquest of Judah in 587 BC, effectively summarizing the whole concept of 'exile', and even to highlight the AD 70 destruction of Jerusalem's second temple (similar to what the Babylonians had done). ...


3

An existing answer provides some bare essentials for a traditional understanding of "Amos's earthquake", that is, the earthquake that came two years after Amos's preaching and therefore (it is often argued) in some way confirmed his ministry. The constellation of Amos 1:1 with Zechariah 14:5 and Isaiah 6:4, extrapolated to 2 Chronicles 26:16 and Josephus, ...


2

Since the similarity between them is, as you point out, more thematic than linguistic, it may be useful to examine if this theme exists before and outside of Amos and Isaiah. Earlier Examples of this Theme The Psalms and Proverbs offer several instances that seem to be the beginnings of these sentiments: Psalm 50:23 The one who offers thanksgiving as ...


1

And ye shall flee to the valley of the mountains; for the valley of the mountains shall reach unto Azal: yea, ye shall flee , like as ye fled from before the earthquake in the days of Uzziah king of Judah: and the LORD my God shall come, and all the saints with Thee. Zechariah 14:5 According to Jewish tradition it happened at the time that Uzziah foolishly ...


1

The Septuagint identifies the remnant of Edom as the "remnant of men", which, in context, appears to be the remnant of Israel: "In that day I will raise up the tabernacle of David that is fallen, and will rebuild the ruins of it, and will set up the parts thereof that have been broken down, and will build it up as in the ancient days: that the remnant of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible