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22

This is actually part of a theme that runs through prophetic literature: the idea that the people of Israel are doing the ritual right but getting all the important stuff wrong. It is consonant with, for example, in the book of Hosea: For I desire steadfast love and not sacrifice, the knowledge of God rather than burnt-offerings. (Hosea 6.6) Or in ...


12

I think lonesomeday has a good answer, but I would like to add another dimension: The festivals and sacrifices being observed in Israel at the time of Amos were also displeasing because they were bound up with idol worship and violated many of the statutes God has given regarding them. The vision Amos receives is written to the people in the day of Jeroboam ...


7

According to Waltke/O'Connor, "the Qal...is simple semantically in that notions of causation are absent." (p. 362). Qal is kinda like the Greek aorist of Hebrew (btw the LXX translates it with an aorist). There is no idea causation being communicated in the stem. This is not to say there is none being implied by the broader context. However, the parsing only ...


7

In part, this seems like a question of the translator's intent, goal or approach. That's not really something we can answer, short of sitting down with the translator and asking them. Some translations do use the same word in both places. In this case, you could substitute either word into the other sentence without really changing the meaning. While I ...


4

Jewish translations make no distinction between the two verses. Rashi looks at the Amos 3:6 in context with the verses before and after 3:6, pointing out that the roar of the lion, mentioned in verses 4 and 8, is the warning from the prophets. The prophets would prophesize a threat of evil -- i.e. Divine Retribution -- unless there is repentence. So, ...


3

Exodus 22:26-27 If you take your neighbor’s cloak as a pledge, return it by sunset, 27 because that cloak is the only covering your neighbor has. What else can they sleep in? When they cry out to me, I will hear, for I am compassionate. The sin described here seems to the abuse they have of the poor to add to their idolatry.  In their bloated abuse ...


2

While I am almost persuaded by the suggestion that the "day" of Amos 8:9 could be 2 August, 2027 -- which I note will be a Bank holiday in Scotland (significant?)1 -- I do believe there is a different, "real" answer to this question, of a sort. tl;dr : My sense is that the "day" described in Amos 8:9 is the same "day" as described in Amos 5:18 (so, for the ...


2

It is almost too easy of a question. As Amos "sees" the word of the Lord, there is a chronology throughout the vision. The condemnations pronounced are not only directed toward Israel, but also to her enemies. In all the judgment statements throughout the prophets, we find this statement, "In that day..." over 100 times. The chronology is simple. 1. God ...


2

I'd like to add the words of Philo, who lived in the 1st century A.D. In Concerning Noah's Work as a Planter (De Plantatione), Ch. XXV, Sec. 107-108, Philo writes, 107 For some persons have fancied the sacrificing of oxen to be piety, and they assign a portion of all that they steal or obtain by denials, or by cheating their creditors, or by plundering, ...


2

My wife summarizes it well: "Sometimes, saying 'sorry' is not enough"; i.e. you have to mean it. In the long list of increasing punishments that the Jews could receive if they should reject G-d's statutes (Lev. 26:14-41) even confessing one's sins, and those of one's father, will not be enough, causing G-d to work on behalf of the enemies of the Jews. ...


2

The rabbis of the talmud, recording received oral tradition, appear to understand God to have arranged the stars into their constellations. The following passage from Tractate B'rachot 58b (in the Babylonian talmud) comments on the passages brought in this question (among others): Samuel contrasted two texts. It is written, Who maketh the Bear, Orion, ...


1

I think the wording of the text draws our minds to ponder the beauty and arrangement of the stars and the power of God who put them in their place.  Back in the days before electricity, the heavens would have been the most fascinating movie theatre to watch and it is no surprise that ancient philosophers identified the idea of God/gods with them and paid ...



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