Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

History of Interpretation άγγελοι in the human sense of "messenger." Some contextual support (10:32, 14:23) to view these "messengers" as outsiders or envoys from other churches. Essentially Paul is hoping to ensure that the Corinthian church does not embarrass themselves. The angels are "guardians of the created order." Paul seems to be drawing on the ...


6

The ambiguity comes from a difference between the Hebrew Old Testament and the Septuagint (a Greek translation). Jesus is teaching to forgive by reversing the statement of Lamech in Genesis 4. Gen 4:24 "If Cain is avenged sevenfold, Then Lamech seventy-sevenfold." (NASB) The NASB follows the Hebrew which has שִׁבְעִים וְשִׁבְעָֽה (shib'iym wshib'ah), ...


5

That there was a Greek word for Aramaic (Suristi) and Luke chooses to use the word for Hebrew in these places (tae Hebraidi dialectow) implies that he meant Hebrew instead of Aramaic. Paul, being a Pharisee and trained by Rabban1 Gamaliel the Elder, would certainly know Hebrew. My answer here shows from literature and archeology that Mishnaic Hebrew was ...


5

The Grammar is Clear The grammar does indicate that stars should be a direct object of what is "made." The verse in Hebrew is this (remember Hebrew is read right to left): And God made וַיַּ֣עַשׂ אֱלֹהִ֔ים two great lights אֶת־שְׁנֵ֥י הַמְּאֹרֹ֖ת הַגְּדֹלִ֑ים the greater light ...


4

Jon's assesment is correct and in keeping with the opinion of D.A. Carson's opinion found in his work on the Gospel of John. A few options that have been presented follow: 1) God is addressing Israel’s judges; 2) God is addressing angels; and 3) God is addressing Israel at the time of the giving of the Law. Jesus’ usage of the passage in John 10 should ...


4

I have teased my mind over this one a few times and what I eventually concluded is that it simply means that angels are actually in attendance when we meet for church worship and they witness any sort of church disorder. Are not all angels ministering spirits sent to serve those who will inherit salvation? (NIV Hebrews 1:14) I think the idea is that ...


3

The issue here isn't one of translation, but rather that it's uncertain what the original Greek text said in this verse (called a "reading"). The committee making the translation has to decide which reading they think is the original, and different committees can make different decisions. This is a particularly fascinating example, as explained here. ...


3

All people are descendants of Adam (Acts 17:26). When Adam disobeyed the Lord, he lost access to the tree of life, which would have enabled him to have lived an indefinite mortal life (Gen 3:22-23). This broken access from the presence of the Lord resulted in the eventual physical death of Adam (Gen 5:5). All descendants of Adam therefore live imperfect, ...


3

The pattern of misunderstanding is charachterized by the following elements: (1) Jesus makes a statement, (2) it is misunderstood and (3) he or the narrator in turn must decipher the meaning of what has been said. The pattern itself suggests its function. In his book the Anatomy of the Fourth Gospel, R. Alan Culpepper notes that the misunderstandings ...


3

To understand these passages, it is necessary to understand the way covenant functions in relation to individuals and groups in the Scripture. The Biblical mindset does not seem to be troubled by the same stark one/many dichotomy that plagues Western philosophy. Read through the Scriptures and you will find many instances that are unsettling to our Western ...


3

This is an interesting question, and one I never reflected upon. Here's just a thought: According to notes in the Swedish Bible translation from 2000, the wording "To the choirmaster" is uncertain and another way to interpret the Hebrew word would be "For invocation". I have not managed to find other references to this. The word in question is למנצח, which ...


3

Examining the Text The Greek text gives a fairly clear clue as to what is being referred to (its just one's theology that tends to get in the way of seeing it). There is a textual variant here, but it is not relevant to the discussion. The variant is found in the majority text and will be noted here by asterisks, like so: τῆς. Since the article follows a ...


3

Τῇ γὰρ χάριτι ἐστε σεσῳσμένοι διὰ πίστεως· καὶ τοῦτο οὐκ ἐξ ὑμῶν, θεοῦ τὸ δῶρον· Ephesians 2:8 For by Grace you are saved through faith and this is not of yourselves,God's Gift. (This is what the Greek texts says) It's explicit that the Gift is Faith because the demonstrative pronoun THIS( τοῦτο) refes to the immediate antecedent which is FAITH. Also, ...


2

τῇ γὰρ χάριτί ἐστε σεσωσμένοι διὰ τῆς πίστεως· καὶ τοῦτο οὐκ ἐξ ὑμῶν Θεοῦ τὸ δῶρον. There is no "it" in the original greek text. The English translators had to put the word "it" as an idiomatic pronoun to make the sentence in English "complete". Idiomatic use of pronoun "it" is very common in English. For example, It is not in my intention to offend you. ...


2

Two scriptures immediately come to mind. I'm not striving for best answer, so excuse the brevity. 1 Corinthians 2:14 But the natural man does not receive the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him, nor can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned. John 3:12 If I have told you earthly things, and you do not ...


2

It seems that the principle is timeless. That is, the head-covering (hair) for women is a timeless principle in all ages and in all places, since angels have co-existed with man since man was created. In fact, angels preexisted man. The Hebrew Bible (Job 38:7) indicates that the "sons of God" rejoiced at the creation of the world. These "sons" were angels ...


1

Many scholars think that Luke is referring to Aramaic or at the very least that it's ambiguous. For example, the NET Bible just translates it directly as "Aramaic," while the ESV translates it as "Hebrew" but has a note "Or the Hebrew dialect (probably Aramaic)." The issue here is less one of a "language family" as that "Hebrew" also refers to the Jewish ...


1

I do not know if there are archaelogical evidence but could it be true that not all of Israel followed Jacob into Egypt. So, when Israel returned from economic self-exile in Egypt back to the promised land, they must have met with a remnant of Jacob's descendants who were entrenched in paganism? The term could refer to the paganistic subculture that still ...


1

I take your third option as the best because we are saved, or justified “by grace through faith,” which is how we receive Jesus Christ and his obedience on our behalf. In case we do not get it, the opposing competitor for such salvation is stressed so that it is absolutely clear. Works is not a competitor to grace, or faith, but to justification and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible