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A literalistic reading of the aforementioned passage in Mathew teaches that under a certain circumstance, namely "your eye causes you to sin," one most poke out his or her own eye. A literary (non-literal) reading of the passage sees the usage of hyperbole and a vivid visual image to communicate the horrifying and traumatic nature of sin. The former reading ...


7

Abstract Using the historical-grammatical method, whether a text should be taken allegorically depends on the genre of the text. Usually, the author provides sufficient clues to the genre for us to accurately determine if a text is to be taken as something more than the surface meaning. Genre One of the challenges of interpreting the Bible is that it ...


6

The church has made many attempts to rid itself of allegorical interpretation for a very good reason. It is based on Greek rhetorical invention, which has no means of validating, or preventing a free-for-all. The reason it has been unsuccessful is because there are so many hints that there is a deeper meaning or a parallel to the life of Christ. Why do so ...


6

In the very earliest Church there were two chief schools of interpretation, coming out of two different catechetical centers: Alexandria and Antioch. The Alexandrian school, of which Origen is perhaps the examplar, favored allegorical interpretation. The Antiochene school, of which Theodore of Mopsuestia is perhaps the highest achievement, favored a more ...


5

Good question. These terms are not mutually exclusive and share elements, making it hard to sometimes understand the difference. Allegory is a type of extended metaphor used in literature to convey a message or belief. A great Christian example of allegory is Aslan the lion from C.S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia. He symbolizes Christ throughout the series ...


4

Good question. There are many fascinating aspects of Paul's hermeneutic that come to the fore here, and we need to do some digging to recognize the source of the connections which he makes. How is Hagar connected to Sinai? First, the connection is there simply in terms of Paul's own controlling metaphor. Throughout Gal 3:22 and onward, Paul has been ...


4

This is a tricky question, because different people define these terms in different ways. But in essence: Allegory is an extended metaphor; this is a meaning intended in the original text Typology is a foreshadowing of later events; this is a secondary meaning that often can only be seen after the fact There is some overlap between the two terms, but ...


4

If allegorical interpretation is a slippery slope, it's of the semantic variety. When you start reading things allegorically, it's certainly possible to stop when the interpretations don't make sense anymore. But it's difficult to draw a clear line between a passage that is intended to be taken strictly literally and one that is not. Further, the ...


3

Traditional allegorists, such as Origen, Clement, and Philo, did believe in the historical events of the Scripture they allegorized. This makes them quite different from more recent allegories such as John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, C.S. Lewis' Pilgrim's Regress, or Spencer's The Faerie Queen. Note that none of these authors are allegorizing Scripture, ...


3

The only certain interpretation of "boil" in this context is as a reference to the food preparation technique. I take these sections of Torah as being something like the US Code. It may be possible to understand the "spirit" of the law and extrapolate a broader or deeper meaning, however. If so, the symbolic, typological, allegorical, or analogous meaning ...


3

The context is the most important clue to Paul’s line of thinking. He has been telling the Galatians that to turn back to the Law after being set free of it through the grace of Christ is foolish. If the righteous live by faith, those that rely on the law are under condemnation, because man cannot be justified by the law. With that background, his thinking ...


2

Allegory is extended metaphor. (True allegory contains its interpretation, as "I am the true vine," John 15:1–8, but this is ignored in the allegorical interpretation.) Allegorical interpretation sees the OT as allegorical. Origen, for instance, said that Abraham's marriage to Keturah was not actual, but represents that there is no end to the getting of ...


2

I will try to answer your first question, What is his method of exegesis? If we figure that the Apostle Paul was "educated at the feet of Gamaliel" about Jewish religious law Acts 23:3. He had to use the the Jewish traditions of interpretation· and exegesis that were used at the time, a very common is the Pardes, an acronym formed from the name initials ...


2

Martin Luther gives a good explanation in his Commentary on Galatians: [In Romans 9, Paul] argues that all the children of Abraham are not the children of God. For Abraham had two kinds of children, children born of the promise, like Isaac, and other children born without the promise, as Ishmael. With this argument Paul squelched the proud Jews who ...


2

Hermeneutics: Scripture has two "senses": a literal (historical) and a spiritual (the message God is trying to get across to us). (See here for further explanation of this.) The Bible is completely true in both senses. Literal: Jesus literally said that "if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away." This statement should be taken as an ...


2

There are two parts to the question: Is allegory appropriate for a particular verse. Is the proposed allegory valid. On the first question there are these views: Enumeration - Allegory is only appropriate where a NT author mentions it as an allegory. Sample - NT authors mention allegory as a sample of what we may find. If we find it, it is appropriate. ...


2

The romantic scene at which your question arises is when the couple is coming up out of a wilderness to the place that was the woman's home, near a fruitful apple tree. She come up with her arm in his and her head in his chest. She never wants this posture to end, that is under his protective care, so she imagines herself forever like this by having her ...


1

The traditional allegories are anachronistic. So, if you accept the text as a product of human effort, it's not one of them. I'm unaware of anyone who has ever argued that it was written (in the ordinary sense) by a person intending an allegory -- that is, an allegory that made sense to someone reading at the time. The Christian version wasn't going to ...


1

Augustine says (De util. cred. iii) that "the Old Testament has a fourfold division as to history, etiology, analogy and allegory." Augustine certainly was not contradicting himself by sharing two interpretations of the four that he believed existed. For those who fear the unknown: Augustine says (Epis. 48). Nevertheless, nothing of Holy Scripture ...



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