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Even conservative theologians acknowledge that Luke was not with Paul on the road to Damascus so, if Luke was the author of Acts, he must have received all three versions from Paul, or at least one version that he subsequently amended for his own reasons and placed in three different contexts. Rex Wyler says,in The Jesus Sayings, page 43, that historians ...


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According to dictionary.com, the English word "divers" may be defined as "(used with a plural verb) an indefinite number more than one." It's not a word we read of very often, but of course, the King James Version was published in the early 17th century when such words may have been more common. Today, we would simply translate the indefinite pronoun ...


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Peter changes more than just the first phrase when he quotes Joel. Acts 2:17 And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams: (KJV) Joel 2:28 And it shall come to pass ...


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If the Palestinian fisherman was actually quoting Joel 2:28, he could be expected to be quoting the Hebrew text, which come down to us (with unknown amendments, if any) in the Masoretic text. Perhaps Peter knew Greek, and we know that Acts 2:8 says he could now speak in every language, but we would still expect him not to quote the Septuagint (LXX), both ...


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The text in Acts 2:17 is a quotation of the Septuagint version of Joel 2:28. (The Hebrew version of the latter is irrelevant for this question). If you look at the two side by side you cannot escape the conclusion that the author of Acts has intentionally altered the text. Compare: Acts 2:17 Καὶ ἔσται ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις λέγει ὁ θεός ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ ...


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The Greek text of Acts 2:17 according to the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1550) states, Καὶ ἔσται ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις λέγει ὁ θεός ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου ἐπὶ πᾶσαν σάρκα καὶ προφητεύσουσιν οἱ υἱοὶ ὑμῶν καὶ αἱ θυγατέρες ὑμῶν καὶ οἱ νεανίσκοι ὑμῶν ὁράσεις ὄψονται καὶ οἱ πρεσβύτεροι ὑμῶν ἐνυπνία ἐνυπνιασθήσονται The Greek phrase ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ...


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Here is something for you. Do you imagine an ancient world where the people knew nothing of agrarian life but only spoke in terms of Greek theater? Picture a team of Oxen pulling a wagon, and the driver using a long sharp stick to motivate the oxen, poking them in the buttOx - pun intended. And what do you think would happen to Oxen who kicked against the ...


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In Acts 26:15, it is said that Paul hears the voice of Jesus say: “Saul, Saul, why persecute me? it is hard for thee to kick against the goads[pros kentra laktizein]," with the KJV using the English synonym 'pricks'. Uta Ranke-Heinemann, in Putting Away Childish Things, page 163-9, claims there is a parallel in the Bacchae, which is approximately five ...


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If the Jews were correct in their claim that Christians had come into Thessalonica claiming there to be another king, called Jesus, then the charge would be both valid and serious. Within the empire, there was no king but Caesar. Rome may appoint kings to conquered territories outside the empire proper or to client states, but Thessalonica was part of the ...


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Good question! Commentators seem divided over whether Paul's vow in Acts 18:18 is 1) The beginning of a nazarite vow, 2) the completion of a nazarite vow, or 3) a different kind of vow altogether. 1) It is the beginning of a nazarite vow. Though nothing is said about the necessity of hair-cutting at the beginning of a vow, it is not unreasonable to think ...



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