New answers tagged

0

The answer to your question is no, the twelve (eleven actually) did not neglect the Lord's command. The lives of the Apostles are not completely documented in the Bible. One needs in some cases to consult the Church histories (e.g. Eusebius) or the Synaxaria ("Lives of the Saints"). A complete list of the twelve apostles with brief summaries of their ...


0

I'm a bit confused about some of the answers and comments on here, so I'd like to try and answer the question and also address what has already been written. If I'm wrong, I would greatly appreciate if somebody would help clarify why. Thank you. καὶ (and)παρήγγειλεν (he instructed) ἡμῖν (us) κηρύξαι (to proclaim) τῷ (to the) λαῷ (people) καὶ (and) ...


1

Nominative participles may take accusative objects, such as John 8:18: ὁ πέμψας με πατήρ the father who sends me But κριτής in Acts 10:42 is nominative (accusative would be κριτήν), so if it is the "argument to ὁρίζω" it is at least in the same case, since this form of ὁρίζω is passive. This is common, particularly with λέγω (to say/name). For ...


1

It seems to be commonly held that Philip referred to here is the same as the deacon in chapter 6. The twelve disciples while they are mentioned in the book of Acts do not seem to be as much in the lime light. Peter is a major player in the first part of Acts and Paul, though not one of the twelve, in the second. The Philip spoken of in chapter 8 is clearly ...


-1

Luke's supposed profession would no doubt matter when interpreting his work as an author, if indeed he was the author. As the question says, tradition assigns Luke as author of the gospel that now bears his name and of Acts of the Apostles, but this is only tradition and these books were originally anonymous, remaining so until the second century. If there ...


-1

Peter, a mere Galilean fisherman, stood up and made an unscripted, impromptu speech in which he demonstrated an accurate recollection of Joel 2:28-32: Acts 2:17-20: And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and ...


1

Luke knew Galatians Logically, the first question to deal with is whether 'Luke' knew Paul's Epistle to the Galatians, because this will inform the answers to the other questions posed. David Ravens (Luke and the Restoration of Israel, pages 174-5) speaks of the epistles generally when he says there are three possible answers: (1) that Luke did not know the ...


0

Paul was probably a diaspora Jew and, if we accept the Acts account (Acts 9:11), came from the city of Tarsus. While the diaspora Jews of Babylon retained Aramaic as their first language, the Jews of the Greek-speaking world abandoned Aramaic and spoke Greek as their first language. Mark Avrum Ehrlich says (Encyclopedia of the Jewish Diaspora, page 9) that ...


0

A person taking a Nazarite vow was to abstain for a specific period from partaking of grapes or any of its products whether intoxicating or not, cutting his hair, and touching a corpse . Such a person is called a Nazirite (Heb. nazir, נָזִיר). At the end of the period of abstention the Nazarite shall shave his head and put the hair in the fire which is under ...


3

One person who advocates this position is Andrew Gregory (The Reception of Luke and Acts in the Period Before Irenaeus, page 2), who says that the modern assumption of Luke and Acts as two volumes of a longer work is a modern construct. He says that this is not to deny that Luke wrote two successive volumes and possibly set out to write two successive ...


7

The general suggestion I have seen for this change is that Stephen (or the author of Acts) has conflated Assyria's conquest of Israel in 722 BC with Babylon's conquest of Judah in 587 BC, effectively summarizing the whole concept of 'exile', and even to highlight the AD 70 destruction of Jerusalem's second temple (similar to what the Babylonians had done). ...


-1

I am thinking that Paul had expertise with the Greek-speaking Jews in Jerusalem as his success there roused opposition from conservative elements in the same community and that was what caused the death threats which drove him back to Tarsus. (I wonder if Paul was despondent for a while after that?)It is a long way by foot or ship to Tarsus from Antioch (in ...


0

The idea that the law was given by angels is Gnostic in origin. Both Simon and Saturninus state that the Old Testament prophecies were inspired by angels. Simon specifically says that they gave the Old Testament law, while Saturninus adds that some of the prophecies came from Satan. Grant, R. M. (1959). Gnosticism and early Christianity. New York: ...


1

Rhetorical imitation Matthew Ryan Hauge (The Biblical Tour of Hell, page 55) says that two recent studies suggest 'Luke' advanced to the early stages of a rhetorical education, which means that he was trained in the art of copying and the complexities of rhetorical composition through mimesis. Whether or not Luke did copy material from Josephus or from any ...


0

Paul's Greek name - Παῦλος - is a transliteration from Latin to Greek of the Latin word for "small" - paulus. The Church Fathers emphasize the aspect of humility in Paul's choice of his new name. Augustine describes why Saul came to be called Paul in one of his Anti-Pelagian Writings: Accordingly Paul, who, although he was formerly called Saul, chose ...


0

The significance of these two names must very much depends on whether there really was a name change from Saul to Paul, or whether Paul was given a Jewish name and a Greek or gentile name as a child - not an uncommon practice among the Jews. On the other hand, it was also quite common, even in Palestine, for Jews to be known only by a Greek name. Examples ...


0

The native Macedonians would have spoken a dialect of Greek. In normal usage, this would have been Koine Greek, although Attic Greek continued in use for written use by cultured Greeks. Mark Avrum Ehrlich says (Encyclopedia of the Jewish Diaspora, page 9) that in the west - the Greek-speaking Mediterranean world - the Jews wrote and spoke only Greek. James ...



Top 50 recent answers are included