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the hellenist or grecians in acts 6:1 were those jews born in the greek lands and can speak both greek and hebrew...also in their conduct they look like greek.


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To summarise: On the one hand we have the evidence of Stephen's speech and the vuv consecutive (or consecutive preterite) וַיֹּאמֶר of Genesis 12:1. On the other hand, we have the arithmetic demonstrating that Abram left Haran before his father died. If one wishes to reconcile these, it is really very simple. The vuv consecutive is in some versions ...


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Acts 7 New International Version (NIV) Stephen’s Speech to the Sanhedrin "7 Then the high priest asked Stephen, “Are these charges true?” 2 To this he replied: “Brothers and fathers, listen to me! The God of glory appeared to our father Abraham while he was still in Mesopotamia, before he lived in Harran. 3 ‘Leave your country and your people,’ God said, ...


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Based on the Talmud, even when it was in force, the standards for applying the death penalty were stringent (Makkot 7b). The Mishna states that the death penalty was infrequent, and that a Sanhedrin that applied the death penalty once every 70 years was considered an irresponsible court (Makkot 1:10). The death penalty was abolished 40 years before the ...


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There do not appear to be any text-critical concerns with the Greek text, only variation in the English translation of the word τεκμήριον (tekmērion, Strong’s G5039). The word is well-attested in literature but appears in only four scripture verses (depending on your tradition): Acts 1:3; Wisdom of Solomon 5:11 and 19:13; and 3 Maccabees 3:24. Thayer’s ...


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This interesting question has two dimensions: (1) the meaning of παρέστησεν ἑαυτὸν ... ἐν πολλοῖς τεκμηρίοις [parestēsen heauton ... en pollois tekmēriois = "he presented himself ... by many tekmēriois"]; and (2) its history of translation in English versions. The Meaning of πολλοῖς τεκμηρίοις The key term here is τεκμήριον which, as noted in an earlier ...


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Acts 1:3 οἷς καὶ παρέστησεν ἑαυτὸν ζῶντα μετὰ τὸ παθεῖν αὐτὸν ἐν πολλοῖς τεκμηρίοις, δι᾽ ἡμερῶν τεσσεράκοντα ὀπτανόμενος αὐτοῖς καὶ λέγων τὰ περὶ τῆς βασιλείας τοῦ θεοῦ· τεκμηρίοις The lexicons seem to be in general agreement that the translation into English of 'proofs' requires an intensifier to bring it into line with the true sense of the Greek term. ...


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There are about 16 New Testament references to Jesus or the Son of Man being at God’s right hand. Acts 7:55-56 is unique in describing the Son of Man as standing (twice), four verses describe him simply as “at” God’s right hand (Acts 2:33, 5:31; Rom.8:34; and 1Pet.3:22), and the remainder describe him as seated (Mt.26:64; Mk.14:62, 16:19; Lk.22:69; Acts ...


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The Greek text for Acts 1:3 has pollois tekmhriois, translated as "many tokens", without the intensifier. The Latin Vulgate also lacks the intensifier. The Catholic, New American Bible follows the Vulgate in not having an intensifier: Acts 1:3: He presented himself alive to them by many proofs after he had suffered, appearing to them during forty days ...


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The word itself - προγνώσει - can mean either "foreknew" (as in having known about it beforehand but not necessarily ordaining of it), or "forethought" (has in having a specific "pre-arrangement"). Interpretations of the word and thereby the meaning of this passage have varied from the opinion of Berkhof, as you've quoted, to that of Archer, who remarks on ...


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Instead of citing "in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit," Eusebius of Caesarea twice mentioned a variant text of Matthew 28:19, But the rest of the apostles, who had been incessantly plotted against with a view to their destruction, and had been driven out of the land of Judea, went unto all nations to preach the Gospel, ...


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yes, the way a person knows that Jesus is, the Father and Son and Spirit is among other scriptures like Isaiah 9:6 says the Son is the Father. But looking at Math.28:19 it says to baptize in the NAME ; so when you look at all the scripture in the bible on how the Apostles baptized; they always every instance baptized people into Jesus name, thousands of ...


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Law and its penalties in biblical times would clearly have been of a somewhat different character than in our culture today. Laws were primarily designed for the interest of the state. If you did something against the state, you'd expect the law to come down hard, but if someone is stoned by a mob for annoying his neighbours, the state would not be ...


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John 18:31 is where you get the idea that the Jews could not put a man to death. But of course, as we know they did stone Stephen in Acts, so what did this statement in John's gospel really mean? Jesus was being accused of blasphemy. Blasphemy was punishable by stoning according to Lev 24:14, so under ordinary circumstances the Jews should have been able to ...


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Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1550): καὶ ἐγένετο ἄφνω ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ ἦχος ὥσπερ φερομένης πνοῆς βιαίας καὶ ἐπλήρωσεν ὅλον τὸν οἶκον οὗ ἦσαν καθήμενοι Nestle-Aland 28th edition: καὶ ἐγένετο ἄφνω ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ ἦχος ὥσπερ φερομένης πνοῆς βιαίας καὶ ἐπλήρωσεν ὅλον τὸν οἶκον οὗ ἦσαν καθήμενοι The Greek phrase translated into English as "the house" is ...



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