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According to a variety of commentaries the name Abram means "high father" while Abraham means "Father of a multitude". The reason it is only "probably" in your commentary is because the usage of the word raham is not clearly attested to in ancient Hebrew itself, but only in closely related languages. Ellicott's Commentary explains it well, plus offers a ...


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Text Exodus 1:6-22 (ESV): 6 Then Joseph died, and all his brothers and all that generation. 7 But the people of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly; they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong, so that the land was filled with them. 8 Now there arose a new king over Egypt, who did not know Joseph. 9 And he said to his people, “Behold, the ...


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In regard to the specific request regarding background information from scripture about Abram's the mother one has to say the bible is virtually silent The Bible does not identify Abram's mother, only his father. Gen 11:26-27 Now Terah lived seventy years, and begot Abram, Nahor, and Haran.This is the genealogy of Terah: Terah begot Abram, Nahor, and ...


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Gen 22: 5 calls Isaac, "na'ar" in Hebrew, (English transl. for 'lad') "From na'ar; (concretely) a boy (as active), from the age of infancy to adolescence; by implication, a servant; also (by interch. Of sex), a girl (of similar latitude in age) -- babe, boy, child, damsel (from the margin), lad, servant, young (man)." http://biblehub.com/hebrew/5289.htm ...


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Among traditional Jewish Scholars there is a dispute about this verse. Onkelos (the aramaic translator of the Pentateuch) translates the verse to mean "when my people were led astray after gods I was forced to leave my fathers house" (וַהֲוָה כַּד טָעוּ עַמְמַיָּא בָּתַר עוֹבָדֵי יְדֵיהוֹן יָתִי קָרִיב יְיָ לְדַחַלְתֵּהּ מִבֵּית אַבָּא). Other scholars, such ...


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To summarise: On the one hand we have the evidence of Stephen's speech and the vuv consecutive (or consecutive preterite) וַיֹּאמֶר of Genesis 12:1. On the other hand, we have the arithmetic demonstrating that Abram left Haran before his father died. If one wishes to reconcile these, it is really very simple. The vuv consecutive is in some versions ...


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Gen 18:1 would indicate that this is a theophany. Genesis 18:1 Then the LORD (יהוה)appeared to him by the terebinth trees of Mamre, as he was sitting in the tent door in the heat of the day. יהוה is Yahweh (Jehovah) see for example: יְהֹוָה Jehovah, pr. name of the supreme God (הָאֱלֹהִים) amongst the Hebrews. [Gesenius, W., & ...


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Was this a standard way to prepare a sacrifice? No. The verb used to describe the binding of Isaac is ʿqd, a term used only here in the Hebrew Bible. There are other terms that could be used to describe a similar action, but none of them is used to describe the preparation of the burnt offering, related most elaborately in Leviticus 1.1 There the basic ...


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Psalm 118:27 speaks of binding the sacrifice with cords. So yes, it appears to have been somewhat standard to prepare sacrifices by binding them first. Matthew Poole also refers to this in his commentary: and bound Isaac his son, partly, because burnt-offerings were to be bound to the altar; of which see Poole on "Psalms 118:27"; partly, to represent ...


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It is quite arguable that the reason Abraham bound Isaac was to simply ensure that Isaac wouldn't try to escape under the stress of impending death. Pain motivates the individual to withdraw from damaging situations, to protect a damaged body part while it heals, and to avoid similar experiences in the future ...


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I suggest it is more useful to look at the context of the name changes rather than the coincidence of spelling changes. A great many of the names of people we find in the Book of Genesis have meanings quite relevant to the story of the persons concerned. As stated, Abram means 'High Father', or perhaps better, 'Exalted Father', while Abraham means 'Father of ...


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Your difficulties in translating Genesis 22:8 and 22:14 are a result of insisting on a certain English translation which may not consistently capture the meaning of the entire passage. The verb ראה usually means "see" or something closely related to seeing. According to Strong's Concordance, the only instance where the verb ראה means "provide" other than ...


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The question of Abram’s ethnicity is interesting from an historical perspective, but the biblical writers offered no information about his early life aside from the names of a few family members and the place they left (Gen.11:26-32). As noted by Jonathan Chell, however, the Talmud includes a great deal more information, even his mother’s name and several ...


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The classical Jewish commentaries provide two answers to this question (and some combine them). The end of the 12:17 is not precisely translated in the question. The Hebrew עַל־דְּבַ֥ר שָׂרַ֖י אֵ֥שֶׁת אַבְרָֽם literally translates as "because of the thing (or incident) of Sarai the wife of Abram." The affliction was one that made intercourse painful. ...


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No one has commented on the section of Scripture between Gen 18:2-5 and Gen 18:23-25. There is a whole dialog where the "visitor" specifically asks after Sarah, (verse 9...how did He know her name?) The "visitor" reaffirms the promise Abraham had received directly from the Lord that He, the Lord, would grant Abraham a son (verse 14), that He would return ...


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I would like to add to Muke Tever's answer the following, as a motivation for Abraham's (Abram) appeal to God on behalf of Sodom. Sodom was important to Abraham In Genesis 13, we are told Abraham and Lot could no longer dwell together because their prosperity was such that, "the land could not bear them" (v. 6). Abraham says to Lot, "Let there be no ...



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