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According to a variety of commentaries the name Abram means "high father" while Abraham means "Father of a multitude". The reason it is only "probably" in your commentary is because the usage of the word raham is not clearly attested to in ancient Hebrew itself, but only in closely related languages. Ellicott's Commentary explains it well, plus offers a ...


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Was this a standard way to prepare a sacrifice? No. The verb used to describe the binding of Isaac is ʿqd, a term used only here in the Hebrew Bible. There are other terms that could be used to describe a similar action, but none of them is used to describe the preparation of the burnt offering, related most elaborately in Leviticus 1.1 There the basic ...


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Text Exodus 1:6-22 (ESV): 6 Then Joseph died, and all his brothers and all that generation. 7 But the people of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly; they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong, so that the land was filled with them. 8 Now there arose a new king over Egypt, who did not know Joseph. 9 And he said to his people, “Behold, the ...


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Before being able to understand what the LORD meant by an "everlasting possession," as it pertained to the covenant He established with Abraham. A covenant the LORD established with Abraham as it pertained to His promised in Isaac, where the LORD said: And I will establish my covenant between me and thee and thy seed after thee in their generations for ...


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Among traditional Jewish Scholars there is a dispute about this verse. Onkelos (the aramaic translator of the Pentateuch) translates the verse to mean "when my people were led astray after gods I was forced to leave my fathers house" (וַהֲוָה כַּד טָעוּ עַמְמַיָּא בָּתַר עוֹבָדֵי יְדֵיהוֹן יָתִי קָרִיב יְיָ לְדַחַלְתֵּהּ מִבֵּית אַבָּא). Other scholars, such ...


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'Abram' means "exalted father". God tells him that he will be the father of many, and changes his name to 'Abraham' which means "father of a multitude". 'Sarai' means "princess", but since she will be the mother of nations, with kings of peoples coming from her, God changes her name to 'Sarah' which means "noblewoman." From Adam Clarke's commentary: ...


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If you recall, Exodus 6:3 portrays God telling Moses that God had only previously been known as God Almighty (El Shaddai), specifically not as 'the LORD' (Yahweh). However, a cursory glance through Genesis shows that the patriarchs most certainly DID know God by his name, Yahweh (Gen 4:26 and Gen 15:6-8 are just two examples). This discrepancy is merely one ...


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It was "invisible" to her, but that doesn't mean it was invisible to everyone or that it was actually transparent. Something had to be changed about her specifically for her to see it, and the change came from God. The text doesn't say that something was changed about the well, but says "God opened her eyes". There are no clues in the text that the well was ...


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Luke 17:3 Take heed to yourselves: If thy brother trespass against thee, rebuke him; and if he repent, forgive him. Greetings James, your last question: But, why do this if Abimelech doesn't even dispute his ownership of the well? This fella Abimelech is the king that took in Abraham's wife as part of his harem. Remember, {Chapter 20} Abraham deceived ...


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Psalm 118:27 speaks of binding the sacrifice with cords. So yes, it appears to have been somewhat standard to prepare sacrifices by binding them first. Matthew Poole also refers to this in his commentary: and bound Isaac his son, partly, because burnt-offerings were to be bound to the altar; of which see Poole on "Psalms 118:27"; partly, to represent ...


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It is quite arguable that the reason Abraham bound Isaac was to simply ensure that Isaac wouldn't try to escape under the stress of impending death. Pain motivates the individual to withdraw from damaging situations, to protect a damaged body part while it heals, and to avoid similar experiences in the future ...


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The act of naming was significant in the covenant making process. Adam gave the woman who was created from him, a new name, a tradition that exists today in the form of a wife changing her name when she gets married. There is an implicit covenant between Adam and the animals in the garden, whom he names as well (the covenant there being a microcosm of the ...


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Most translations say the seven ewes were presented "as a witness". The NET translates this as "legal proof", which would suggest evidence. Abraham didn't intend the livestock as a purchase price, but as a witness to convince the judge that he was the rightful owner. In contrast to the servants of Abimelech who had seized the well without any investment ...


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The text at hand is as follows: The transliterated phrase is literally "for not-salem (שָׁלֵ֛ם) avon (עֲוֹ֥ן) the Amorites yet is here", and so the meaning really hinges on those words salem and awon. Salem / שָׁלֵ֛ם / 8003 This is essentially an adjective form of 'shalom', applying a concept of wholeness, fullness or completeness to its paired noun. ...


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I suggest it is more useful to look at the context of the name changes rather than the coincidence of spelling changes. A great many of the names of people we find in the Book of Genesis have meanings quite relevant to the story of the persons concerned. As stated, Abram means 'High Father', or perhaps better, 'Exalted Father', while Abraham means 'Father of ...


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The classical Jewish commentaries provide two answers to this question (and some combine them). The end of the 12:17 is not precisely translated in the question. The Hebrew עַל־דְּבַ֥ר שָׂרַ֖י אֵ֥שֶׁת אַבְרָֽם literally translates as "because of the thing (or incident) of Sarai the wife of Abram." The affliction was one that made intercourse painful. ...


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No one has commented on the section of Scripture between Gen 18:2-5 and Gen 18:23-25. There is a whole dialog where the "visitor" specifically asks after Sarah, (verse 9...how did He know her name?) The "visitor" reaffirms the promise Abraham had received directly from the Lord that He, the Lord, would grant Abraham a son (verse 14), that He would return ...


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I would like to add to Muke Tever's answer the following, as a motivation for Abraham's (Abram) appeal to God on behalf of Sodom. Sodom was important to Abraham In Genesis 13, we are told Abraham and Lot could no longer dwell together because their prosperity was such that, "the land could not bear them" (v. 6). Abraham says to Lot, "Let there be no ...



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