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12

Why did Abraham stop there? From the narrative we can see that Abraham was clearly reluctant—out of pure fear, apparently—to question God's judgment. When asking for 45 in Genesis 18:27, he starts with: Now that I have been so bold as to speak to the Lord, though I am nothing but dust and ashes When asking for 30 in Genesis 18:30: May the Lord ...


11

The text in Genesis does not say "only-begotten" but does say "only". The beginning of the verse is: וַיֹּאמֶר קַח-נָא אֶת-בִּנְךָ אֶת-יְחִידְךָ אֲשֶׁר-אָהַבְתָּ, אֶת-יִצְחָק My literal translation: And he said: please take your son, your only [one], whom you love, Yitzchak This is clearly a problem, as Avraham has two sons. So "only" can't ...


11

An answer is in some of the text you elided: 20 And the LORD said: 'Verily, the cry of Sodom and Gomorrah is great, and, verily, their sin is exceeding grievous. 21 I will go down now, and see whether they have done altogether according to the cry of it, which is come unto Me; and if not, I will know.' Then the men leave -- the number is ...


8

The "two" in some translations is an interpretative addition. It does not exist in the Hebrew of Gen 18:22, which is simply הָֽאֲנָשִׁ֔ים ("the men"). The word "two" is added in those translations for "clarity" (which clarity can inadvertently create confusion, such as evidenced in your question). The idea is added because it is understood by many ...


8

Short Answer: Abram did indeed depart from Haran after his father died, as the Old Testament indicates, and as the New Testament explicitly claims. (Terah was 130 years old when Abram was born.) Good question. (This happens to be one of the most commonly asked -- and addressed -- "discrepancies" in Scripture.) The problem is in the modern Western reading ...


7

What Promise is this? There is none in these words. So write Sanday and Headlam (A critical and exegetical commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, 5th edn (ICC; T & T Clark, 1902), p. 111). They don't go on to explain much, and here James Denney (notable Scottish theologian) does a better job in the Expositor's Greek Testament (Hodder & ...


7

As the text says, Avram was 75 when he left Haran. So, either Terach was 130 when Avram was born, or Avram left while Terach was still alive. The medieval commentator (and compiler), Rashi, argues for Avram leaving during Terach's lifetime, based on Gen 12:4: and Terah died in Haran: [This happened] after Abram had left Haran and had come to the land ...


7

He knew that eight was not enough to save the world in Noach's time, so that sets a lower bound. Eight righteous people didn't have enough merit to prevent the flood, though it seems God regretted the flood and might have welcomed any excuse not to do it. If that's true, then surely the same number of people wouldn't have enough merit to protect a few ...


6

Ge 16:15 And Hagar bare Abram a son: and Abram called his son’s name, which Hagar bare, Ishmael. Ge 16:16 And Abram was fourscore and six years old, when Hagar bare Ishmael to Abram. Ge 17:5 Neither shall thy name any more be called Abram, but thy name shall be Abraham; for a father of many nations have I made thee. Ge 17:19 And ...


5

I don't think there is a physical link. As you point out, he fathered Ishmael by Hagar 13 years before. To me that indicates the infertility is Sarai's. If there is a link between Isaac's birth and this circumcision, it would be that now God was ready to fulfill the promises of Gen 12 and 13 and gave Abram and his descendants a sign to show they were in ...


4

This question is interesting in its own right, but all the more so in light of John's pronouncement in Matthew 3:9 that God is able from stones to raise up children for Abraham. One way we might understand the argument in Exodus 32 is to note that Moses does not ask God to remember his promise so much as to remember his servants to whom he made the promise. ...


4

When the Tanak was first written, it was written without vowels. In the early Middle Ages (ca AD 800), scribes known as the Masoretes added the system of vowel points (niqqud or "diacretic markings") that are used in pointed Hebrew texts since then. Other systems were developed at roughly the same time (as Hebrew became less of a spoken language), but only ...


4

Short Answer: I think there is precedent for considering Isaac Abraham's "only son" in one sense despite the fact that Ishamel was also technically his son in another sense based solely on the fact that Ishmael was born by Hagar the concubine and not by Sarah his wife. The "contradiction" In Genesis 22:2 God said to Abraham: Take now your son, your ...


4

Let me give you an example. In one verse, Lot is said to be Avram's brother (Gen. 14:16: אֶת־לֹוט אָחִיו). Elsewhere, Lot is described as the son of Haran (Gen. 11:31: וְאֶת־לֹוט בֶּן־הָרָן), Avram's brother (Gen. 14:12: בֶּן־אֲחִי אַבְרָם). Strictly speaking, this would make Lot, Avram's nephew. So, we see that a nephew (as Lot is to Avram) is referred to ...


3

My Hebrew is basic, but I do read Greek. Sarah refers to Abraham as her kurios in Genesis 18:12 in the Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament.) Yet she does not address him directly with that word in her commentary of 1 Peter, Karen Jobes (2005:205) notes that "This noun [kurios] is the only lexical connection between the story of Sarah and Peter’s claim.” ...


3

The classic Jewish commentator Rashi quoting the Medrash and the Talmud says: and Abraham weighed out to Ephron: עֶפְרֹן is spelled without a “vav,” because he promised much but did not do even a little [i.e., he promised the cave as a gift but took a great deal of money for it], for he took from him large shekels, viz. centenaria [worth one ...


2

You are correct in noting that His promises to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob could have been fulfilled through Moses. However, consider verses 11-12. Moses points to two aspects of the Exodus that would be affected by a rejection of Israel: God demonstrated His mighty power in bringing out the Israelites from Egypt. This would effectively be wasted effort on ...


2

In v32, after he has been down to witness the sin and returned, Moshe tells God "if you will not forgive them, wipe me out too". Perhaps he had this in mind earlier; he'd already resolved that he wouldn't consent to being the new Avraham if the Israelites were not found worthy to continue? Please note: This answer was written for a neutral, academic ...


2

The answer lies in the understanding of the word "Kosmos", which in English is translated "world", yet has a variety of meanings in the Greek. I am not a linguist, but after searching, found this exposition by A.W. Pink: It may appear to some of our readers that the exposition we have given of John 3:16 in the chapter on "Difficulties and Objections" ...


2

The Bible does not explicitly say "two men" at Gen. 18:22, simply saying "the men" (האנשים). The translators, like the rabbis, infer that two men were there because of the transition at Gen. 19:1 ("And the two angels came to Sodom..."). Rashi, citing the Jewish tradition recorded in the Babylonian Talmud at Bava Metzia 86b) reflects that there were three ...


2

In your haste you may have skipped over perhaps the most important aspect of God's promise to Abraham while he was still living with his father's family in Ur. "'And in you all the families of the earth will be blessed'" (Genesis 12:3, my emphasis). About 25 years later, God appeared again to Abram and renamed him Abraham, renewing the promise He made ...


1

According to the plain and normal reading of the Bible, "the world" would be blessed through Abraham (Gen 18:18 and Acts 3:25 with Gal 3:8). The nuance is that the lesser is blessed by the greater (Heb 7:7). If the nations are blessed through Abraham, the connotation is that Abraham is greater than the nations. His seed, who represents all the promises given ...


1

Q#1: How and when did the trinity of visitors ever find out Sarah would be having a son? Gen 18:1, Then the Lord appeared to him by the terebinth trees of Mamre God was among the visitors, or at least represented by the visitors. Q#2's: If we had 3 visitors and the Lord seeing Abraham, only 2 men walked farther toward Sodom, the Lord departed after ...



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