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13

Why did Abraham stop there? From the narrative we can see that Abraham was clearly reluctant—out of pure fear, apparently—to question God's judgment. When asking for 45 in Genesis 18:27, he starts with: Now that I have been so bold as to speak to the Lord, though I am nothing but dust and ashes When asking for 30 in Genesis 18:30: May the Lord ...


10

Short Answer: Abram did indeed depart from Haran after his father died, as the Old Testament indicates, and as the New Testament explicitly claims. (Terah was 130 years old when Abram was born.) Good question. (This happens to be one of the most commonly asked -- and addressed -- "discrepancies" in Scripture.) The problem is in the modern Western reading ...


9

Short Answer: I think there is precedent for considering Isaac Abraham's "only son" in one sense despite the fact that Ishamel was also technically his son in another sense based solely on the fact that Ishmael was born by Hagar the concubine and not by Sarah his wife. The "contradiction" In Genesis 22:2 God said to Abraham: Take now your son, your ...


8

What Promise is this? There is none in these words. So write Sanday and Headlam (A critical and exegetical commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, 5th edn (ICC; T & T Clark, 1902), p. 111). They don't go on to explain much, and here James Denney (notable Scottish theologian) does a better job in the Expositor's Greek Testament (Hodder & Stoughton, ...


8

The "two" in some translations is an interpretative addition. It does not exist in the Hebrew of Gen 18:22, which is simply הָֽאֲנָשִׁ֔ים ("the men"). The word "two" is added in those translations for "clarity" (which clarity can inadvertently create confusion, such as evidenced in your question). The idea is added because it is understood by many ...


7

Let me give you an example. In one verse, Lot is said to be Avram's brother (Gen. 14:16: אֶת־לֹוט אָחִיו). Elsewhere, Lot is described as the son of Haran (Gen. 11:31: וְאֶת־לֹוט בֶּן־הָרָן), Avram's brother (Gen. 14:12: בֶּן־אֲחִי אַבְרָם). Strictly speaking, this would make Lot, Avram's nephew. So, we see that a nephew (as Lot is to Avram) is referred to ...


7

According to a variety of commentaries the name Abram means "high father" while Abraham means "Father of a multitude". The reason it is only "probably" in your commentary is because the usage of the word raham is not clearly attested to in ancient Hebrew itself, but only in closely related languages. Ellicott's Commentary explains it well, plus offers a ...


6

Ge 16:15 And Hagar bare Abram a son: and Abram called his son’s name, which Hagar bare, Ishmael. Ge 16:16 And Abram was fourscore and six years old, when Hagar bare Ishmael to Abram. Ge 17:5 Neither shall thy name any more be called Abram, but thy name shall be Abraham; for a father of many nations have I made thee. Ge 17:19 And God ...


5

I don't think there is a physical link. As you point out, he fathered Ishmael by Hagar 13 years before. To me that indicates the infertility is Sarai's. If there is a link between Isaac's birth and this circumcision, it would be that now God was ready to fulfill the promises of Gen 12 and 13 and gave Abram and his descendants a sign to show they were in ...


5

This question is interesting in its own right, but all the more so in light of John's pronouncement in Matthew 3:9 that God is able from stones to raise up children for Abraham. One way we might understand the argument in Exodus 32 is to note that Moses does not ask God to remember his promise so much as to remember his servants to whom he made the promise. ...


5

This is an interesting question. To put this verse into context we must begin with chapter 12 where we learn that G-d commands Avram to leave his home and to go to some place G-d will eventually show him and therein make from him a "great nation." Gen. 12:1. He goes -- at the age of 75 and childless, bringing with him his wife and nephew. At Gen. 12:7, G-...


4

My Hebrew is basic, but I do read Greek. Sarah refers to Abraham as her kurios in Genesis 18:12 in the Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament.) Yet she does not address him directly with that word in her commentary of 1 Peter, Karen Jobes (2005:205) notes that "This noun [kurios] is the only lexical connection between the story of Sarah and Peter’s claim.” ...


4

This passage would have been understood according to its plain meaning, and in the context of the previous passages, that is, that after G-d promised Abram something almost unbelievable, Abram truly believed and we are told that he was rewarded for this act of faith. Just before this passage, G-d spoke to Abram and said: (Genesis 15:3) "Do not be afraid, ...


4

The classic Jewish commentator Rashi quoting the Medrash and the Talmud says: and Abraham weighed out to Ephron: עֶפְרֹן is spelled without a “vav,” because he promised much but did not do even a little [i.e., he promised the cave as a gift but took a great deal of money for it], for he took from him large shekels, viz. centenaria [worth one ...


4

When the Tanak was first written, it was written without vowels. In the early Middle Ages (ca AD 800), scribes known as the Masoretes added the system of vowel points (niqqud or "diacretic markings") that are used in pointed Hebrew texts since then. Other systems were developed at roughly the same time (as Hebrew became less of a spoken language), but only ...


4

Was this a standard way to prepare a sacrifice? No. The verb used to describe the binding of Isaac is ʿqd, a term used only here in the Hebrew Bible. There are other terms that could be used to describe a similar action, but none of them is used to describe the preparation of the burnt offering, related most elaborately in Leviticus 1.1 There the basic ...


3

You are correct in noting that His promises to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob could have been fulfilled through Moses. However, consider verses 11-12. Moses points to two aspects of the Exodus that would be affected by a rejection of Israel: God demonstrated His mighty power in bringing out the Israelites from Egypt. This would effectively be wasted effort on ...


3

Text Exodus 1:6-22 (ESV): 6 Then Joseph died, and all his brothers and all that generation. 7 But the people of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly; they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong, so that the land was filled with them. 8 Now there arose a new king over Egypt, who did not know Joseph. 9 And he said to his people, “Behold, the ...


2

To summarise: On the one hand we have the evidence of Stephen's speech and the vuv consecutive (or consecutive preterite) וַיֹּאמֶר of Genesis 12:1. On the other hand, we have the arithmetic demonstrating that Abram left Haran before his father died. If one wishes to reconcile these, it is really very simple. The vuv consecutive is in some versions ...


2

Just some additional thoughts... The Aramaic Targum of Onkelos: וְהֵימֵין בְמֵימְרָא דַיוי וְחַשבַה לֵיה לְזָכוּ׃ And he believed (had faith) in the Word of Yahveh, and He accounted it to him for righteousness. זכו, like the Greek word δικαιοσύνη, means a favorable legal standing in court, i.e., righteousness, merit. A judgment (מִשְׁפָּט) is ...


2

The answer lies in the understanding of the word "Kosmos", which in English is translated "world", yet has a variety of meanings in the Greek. I am not a linguist, but after searching, found this exposition by A.W. Pink: It may appear to some of our readers that the exposition we have given of John 3:16 in the chapter on "Difficulties and Objections" ...


2

Among traditional Jewish Scholars there is a dispute about this verse. Onkelos (the aramaic translator of the Pentateuch) translates the verse to mean "when my people were led astray after gods I was forced to leave my fathers house" (וַהֲוָה כַּד טָעוּ עַמְמַיָּא בָּתַר עוֹבָדֵי יְדֵיהוֹן יָתִי קָרִיב יְיָ לְדַחַלְתֵּהּ מִבֵּית אַבָּא). Other scholars, such ...


2

In regard to the specific request regarding background information from scripture about Abram's the mother one has to say the bible is virtually silent The Bible does not identify Abram's mother, only his father. Gen 11:26-27 Now Terah lived seventy years, and begot Abram, Nahor, and Haran.This is the genealogy of Terah: Terah begot Abram, Nahor, and ...


2

Gen 22: 5 calls Isaac, "na'ar" in Hebrew, (English transl. for 'lad') "From na'ar; (concretely) a boy (as active), from the age of infancy to adolescence; by implication, a servant; also (by interch. Of sex), a girl (of similar latitude in age) -- babe, boy, child, damsel (from the margin), lad, servant, young (man)." http://biblehub.com/hebrew/5289.htm ...


2

The Bible does not explicitly say "two men" at Gen. 18:22, simply saying "the men" (האנשים). The translators, like the rabbis, infer that two men were there because of the transition at Gen. 19:1 ("And the two angels came to Sodom..."). Rashi, citing the Jewish tradition recorded in the Babylonian Talmud at Bava Metzia 86b) reflects that there were three ...


2

Gen 18:1 would indicate that this is a theophany. Genesis 18:1 Then the LORD (יהוה)appeared to him by the terebinth trees of Mamre, as he was sitting in the tent door in the heat of the day. יהוה is Yahweh (Jehovah) see for example: יְהֹוָה Jehovah, pr. name of the supreme God (הָאֱלֹהִים) amongst the Hebrews. [Gesenius, W., & ...


2

Your difficulties in translating Genesis 22:8 and 22:14 are a result of insisting on a certain English translation which may not consistently capture the meaning of the entire passage. The verb ראה usually means "see" or something closely related to seeing. According to Strong's Concordance, the only instance where the verb ראה means "provide" other than ...


2

Before being able to understand what the LORD meant by an "everlasting possession," as it pertained to the covenant He established with Abraham. A covenant the LORD established with Abraham as it pertained to His promised in Isaac, where the LORD said: And I will establish my covenant between me and thee and thy seed after thee in their generations for ...


2

This site explains it with more biblical context for support. Namely: Abram/Abraham was currently allies with an Amorite Gen 14:14. "not yet full" Amorites increased in Idolatry = "iniquity" Amorites increased in Immorality = "iniquity" "Complete" when Israel displaces Canaan/Amorite under Joshua. The entire context of Leviticus 18 and Leviticus 20 ...



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