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These two words have very similar definitions because they derive from the same word, τίθημι (to set, put, place). παρακαταθήκην According to An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon by Liddell and Scott this word means: deposit of money or property entrusted to one's care This word appears twice in the New Testament (Textus Receptus): 1 Tim 6:20 and ...


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Paul is linking his righteous law keeping as being a continuation of their Jewish religion. This righteousness is not a sinless perfectionism but through the use of the God ordained means of repentance confession washing and sin offering. After using these means the worshipper walks away with a clear conscience because his sin is covered.


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The 'good deposit' referred to in v14 would most logically be 'the pattern of sound words' that the writer refers to in v13. I don't any reason to look back to a prior sentence to determine what the deposit is. Maybe the writer is referring back to what was written previously to the same recipient. Look also to 1 Tim 6:20 where we read 'τὴν παραθήκην ...


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I think that we need to understand firstly that Paul is contrasting Onesiphorus and his household with those people he mentions in v14. He is commending them for their care of him. The fact that it is just Onesiphorus' household that Paul speaks of in v15 and not Onesiphorus himself suggests that he wasn't there at the time. That might mean that he was ...


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Sentiment often views the 'books' and 'parchments' as scriptures One other view has been presented by T C Skeat in “ ‘Especially the Parchments’: A Note on 2 Timothy 4:13,” JTS n.s. 30 (1979): 174. Skeat views the adverb “especially” (malista) as equating the “scrolls” and the “parchments” instead of differentiating between them. In his view Paul would ...


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The key of this text is the phrase that day, which occurs in the following three verses: 2 Tim 1:16-18 (NASB) 16 The Lord grant mercy to the house of Onesiphorus, for he often refreshed me and was not ashamed of my chains; 17 but when he was in Rome, he eagerly searched for me and found me— 18the Lord grant to him to find mercy from the Lord on that ...


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The text provided in the question is an accurate translation of the Greek text seen here. This does not state that Onesiphorus is already dead, but gives us clues that lead to that conclusion. First, the mention of Onesiphorus' grieving family ("The Lord give mercy unto the house of Onesiphorus"), then the hope that the Lord will grant mercy in that ...



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