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12

The question sets out nicely the way in which Paul's broken relationship with Mark was healed and later flourished -- with, it seems, a new depth of character in Mark. Was it, one wonders, a case of Mark growing as a result of the relational trauma with Paul? There are, however, fewer "dots" to "connect" in the case of Paul's relationship with Barnabas, his ...


11

The events of Act 15 are dated to AD 48. It is worth noting that Paul and Barnabas solved the immediate problem in a good way. When compromise was impossible ("I want X," "Not a chance"), they parted ways. This also wasn't the first time that Paul and Barnabas had disagreed on how to operate. Galatians 2:12 Until certain people came from James, he had ...


7

Based on the record of the conversation on the road to Emmaus when Jesus "beginning with Moses and with all the prophets, He explained to them the things concerning Himself in all the Scriptures" {Luke 24:27}, that "the scriptures" must indicate the Old Testament - since the earliest aspect of the New Testament wasn't written until about 50 AD. Given that ...


7

I'm probably going to come close to the conclusion of the first answer but hopefully will provide some other thoughts. Paul takes on Timothy on the beginning of his 2nd missionary journey (~49 A.D.). Conservative scholars date 1 Timothy to between 62-67 A.D. (after Paul's first imprisonment). There's no solid data on how old Timothy was when Paul took ...


6

2 Tim 4:16-18 At my first defense no one stood with me, but all forsook me. May it not be charged against them. But the Lord stood with me and strengthened me, so that the message might be preached fully through me, and that all the Gentiles might hear. Also I was delivered out of the mouth of the lion. And the Lord will deliver me from every evil work ...


6

The evidence strongly suggests that when New Testament authors refer to scripture, or say "it is written", they are referring to pre-Christian Jewish sacred writings and not what is now the New Testament. The one possible exception is the author of 2 Peter. (I hesitate to say "Hebrew Bible" for three reasons. First, most of them use the Septuagint ...


5

As GalacticCowboy's answer suggests, the phrase seems to be related to commissioning elders. Given that Paul was a student of Gamaliel (Acts 22) and the author of Hebrews seems deeply knowledgeable about Jewish sacrificial rites and uses arguments similar to Paul's in Galatians, it seems possible that both are referencing the rabbinic practice of semikhah ...


5

The pre-Pauline references to the brother magicians are rare. Other answers draw attention to the mention of the names by Pliny in his Natural History (XXX.1.11). This was published at the end of the 70s, however, and so is only evidence that the names were current by Paul's time. There was a theory that the second century BCE Jewish historian Artapanus, ...


4

This text consists of five imperatives: κήρυξον τὸν λόγον, | kēryxon ton logon | (Preach the Word) ἐπίστηθι εὐκαίρως ἀκαίρως, | epistēthi eukairōs akairōs | (be ready in season [and] out of season) ἔλεγξον, | elenxon | (reprove) ἐπιτίμησον, | epitimēson | (rebuke) παρακάλεσον, | parakaleson | (exhort) ἐν πάσῃ μακροθυμίᾳ καὶ διδαχῇ. | en pasē makrothymia ...


3

As already noted, the LXX is the best place to start, since the Greek word ὀρθοτομέω only occurs once in the Greek New Testament (hapax legomenon). The below verses compare the Greek LXX with the Hebrew MT, which will point us to the Hebrew words. In turn, we will look at the Hebrew words. Proverbs 3:6 (MT) בְּכָל־דְּרָכֶיךָ דָעֵהוּ וְהוּא יְיַשֵּׁר ...


3

The key of this text is the phrase that day, which occurs in the following three verses: 2 Tim 1:16-18 (NASB) 16 The Lord grant mercy to the house of Onesiphorus, for he often refreshed me and was not ashamed of my chains; 17 but when he was in Rome, he eagerly searched for me and found me— 18the Lord grant to him to find mercy from the Lord on that ...


3

2 Tim 4:2 and Titus 1:3 both have τὸν λόγον (ton logon) in Greek. The decision whether to caplitalize or not is wholly down to the instinct of the editors of that particular translation. It is worth noting, too, that this is a "luxury" of English: not every language system as the same lower-, upper-case distinctions that modern English does. What the ...


3

Exactly as others have said: these names appear in Jewish non-biblical tradition, specifically in the Targum of Pseudo-Jonathan to Exodus 7:11, as well as in later Hellenistic sources (like Josephus). Martin McNamara discusses it here, and there is a lengthy discussion of the Jewish and Greek sources here as well (page 1-71). As Frank Luke noted in a ...


3

According to Pliny's natural history, in discussing the origin of magic in the world he mentions Jannes in relation to Moses. There is another sect, also, of adepts in the magic art, who derive their origin from Moses, Jannes, and Lotapea,Jews by birth, but many thousand years posterior to Zoroaster: and as much more recent, again, is the branch of ...


3

In 1 Timothy 5:22, the context (starting from verse 17) appears to be focused upon the appointment of elders (presbuteros). It seems from various passages (Acts 6:6, 13:3; 1 Timothy 4:14) that this act (laying on of hands) symbolized the dedication or commissioning of an individual to a task - in this case, leading the church. 2 Timothy 1:6 apparently ...


3

First, the four words in Greek and their primary Strong' definition: didaskalia <1319>: "teaching, instruction" elegchos <1650>: "a proof, that by which a thing is proved or tested" epanorthosis <1882>: "restoration to an upright or right state" paideia <3809>: "the whole training and education of children (which relates to the cultivation of ...


2

In this case the answer is a bit more clear if you read from a different translation: If we deny Him, He also will deny us; If we are faithless, He remains faithful, for He cannot deny Himself. -2 Timothy 2:12-13, NASB Faith means "trust in God". This is the source of the confusion. In modern English, when we say "faith", it can mean ...


2

As to your first question: Is 2 Tim. 1:6 a parallel to 1 Tim. 4:14? That is, do they refer to the same "gift" and the same "laying on of hands" event? According to the several Bibles and commentaries I've examined, yes. As to your second question: What "spiritual gift" is Paul referring to in 1 Tim. 4:14? Ignatius (Epistle to the Ephesians 13, ...


2

Paul's warning about "the last days" would be strange if he were merely describing the normal brokenness that has been common to man since the dawn of time. (Such brokenness would not be news to anyone, and would not be specific to "the last days.") He seems to be anticipating something unusual. ...And yet, the characteristics he is describing have been ...


2

The Greek text of 2 Tim. 1:3 according to Robert Estienne's Textus Receptus (1550) states, Χάριν ἔχω τῷ θεῷ ᾧ λατρεύω ἀπὸ προγόνων ἐν καθαρᾷ συνειδήσει ὡς ἀδιάλειπτον ἔχω τὴν περὶ σοῦ μνείαν ἐν ταῖς δεήσεσίν μου νυκτὸς καὶ ἡμέρας On the Greek word πρόγονος, Joseph Thayer writes,(1) πρό-γονος, -ου, ὁ, (προγίνομαι), born before, older: Hom. Od. 9, ...


2

The Greek word ἐπανόρθωσιν is a noun declined in the accusative case; the lemma is ἐπανόρθωσις. BDAG defines the Greek word ἐπανόρθωσις as follows:(1) ἐπανόρθωσις, εως, ἡ ‘correcting, restoration’ (cp. e.g. ISardGauthier 3, 1 ‘restoration’ of a city; 1 Esdr 8:52; 1 Macc 14:34) then in transf. sense improvement (Ps.-Pla., Tim. L., 104a; Heraclid. ...


2

I think that we need to understand firstly that Paul is contrasting Onesiphorus and his household with those people he mentions in v14. He is commending them for their care of him. The fact that it is just Onesiphorus' household that Paul speaks of in v15 and not Onesiphorus himself suggests that he wasn't there at the time. That might mean that he was ...


2

Evangelist You, however, be self-controlled in all things, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry. 2 Timothy 4:5. This scripture identifies this gift as that of Evangelist, which is the same gift in Ephesians 4:11. In context of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus (and the work that Paul instructed them to carry out) it is clear we in ...


2

The word ἄρτιος (artios) is not found elsewhere in the New Testament or the Septuagint, but it is reasonably well-attested in Classical Greek literature; LSJ provides many examples. BDAG gives: pertaining to being well fitted for some function, complete, capable, proficient = able to meet all demands Although the word is a hapax within the Greek Bible, ...


1

The text provided in the question is an accurate translation of the Greek text seen here. This does not state that Onesiphorus is already dead, but gives us clues that lead to that conclusion. First, the mention of Onesiphorus' grieving family ("The Lord give mercy unto the house of Onesiphorus"), then the hope that the Lord will grant mercy in that ...


1

What "Paul" is trying to impress on Timothy is that the message that H&P were spreading around was not only incorrect but also subversive: ESV 2Ti 2:14 Remind them of these things, and charge them before God not to quarrel about words, which does no good, but only ruins the hearers. 2Ti 2:15 Do your best to present yourself to God as one ...


1

A DISAGREEMENT ARISES “They had such a sharp disagreement that they parted company. Barnabas took Mark and sailed for Cyprus, but Paul chose Silas and left, commended by the brothers to the grace of the Lord. He went through Syria and Cilicia, strengthening the churches.” (Acts 15:39-41) NIV NO BREACH There is actually no mention of a 'breach' which ...


1

Is 2 Tim. 1:6 a parallel to 1 Tim. 4:14? That is, do they refer to the same "gift" and the same "laying on of hands" event? I ask because this could affect our interpretation of 1 Tim. 4:14. These verses are parallel for three reasons. First, the word for "gift" (χάρισμα) and "hands" (χειρῶν) is the same, and the entire construction looks similar. Second, ...



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