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7

I'm probably going to come close to the conclusion of the first answer but hopefully will provide some other thoughts. Paul takes on Timothy on the beginning of his 2nd missionary journey (~49 A.D.). Conservative scholars date 1 Timothy to between 62-67 A.D. (after Paul's first imprisonment). There's no solid data on how old Timothy was when Paul took ...


7

Based on the record of the conversation on the road to Emmaus when Jesus "beginning with Moses and with all the prophets, He explained to them the things concerning Himself in all the Scriptures" {Luke 24:27}, that "the scriptures" must indicate the Old Testament - since the earliest aspect of the New Testament wasn't written until about 50 AD. Given that ...


6

2 Tim 4:16-18 At my first defense no one stood with me, but all forsook me. May it not be charged against them. But the Lord stood with me and strengthened me, so that the message might be preached fully through me, and that all the Gentiles might hear. Also I was delivered out of the mouth of the lion. And the Lord will deliver me from every evil work ...


4

As GalacticCowboy's answer suggests, the phrase seems to be related to commissioning elders. Given that Paul was a student of Gamaliel (Acts 22) and the author of Hebrews seems deeply knowledgeable about Jewish sacrificial rites and uses arguments similar to Paul's in Galatians, it seems possible that both are referencing the rabbinic practice of semikhah ...


3

In 1 Timothy 5:22, the context (starting from verse 17) appears to be focused upon the appointment of elders (presbuteros). It seems from various passages (Acts 6:6, 13:3; 1 Timothy 4:14) that this act (laying on of hands) symbolized the dedication or commissioning of an individual to a task - in this case, leading the church. 2 Timothy 1:6 apparently ...


3

First, the four words in Greek and their primary Strong' definition: didaskalia <1319>: "teaching, instruction" elegchos <1650>: "a proof, that by which a thing is proved or tested" epanorthosis <1882>: "restoration to an upright or right state" paideia <3809>: "the whole training and education of children (which relates to the cultivation of ...


2

As to your first question: Is 2 Tim. 1:6 a parallel to 1 Tim. 4:14? That is, do they refer to the same "gift" and the same "laying on of hands" event? According to the several Bibles and commentaries I've examined, yes. As to your second question: What "spiritual gift" is Paul referring to in 1 Tim. 4:14? Ignatius (Epistle to the Ephesians 13, ...


2

The methods of Sensus Plenior provide a mechanism by which such questions can be examined in more detail. This is a system for interpreting the 'dark sayings' or 'riddles' of the Bible. Such riddles interlock giving the interpreter clues from the greater context of the Bible to discern meaning in the passage being considered. We assume the author uses the ...


2

In this case the answer is a bit more clear if you read from a different translation: If we deny Him, He also will deny us; If we are faithless, He remains faithful, for He cannot deny Himself. -2 Timothy 2:12-13, NASB Faith means "trust in God". This is the source of the confusion. In modern English, when we say "faith", it can mean ...


2

Paul's warning about "the last days" would be strange if he were merely describing the normal brokenness that has been common to man since the dawn of time. (Such brokenness would not be news to anyone, and would not be specific to "the last days.") He seems to be anticipating something unusual. ...And yet, the characteristics he is describing have been ...


1

The very notion of scripture carries with it an idea of the infallible and all powerful commanding perfect voice of God.  This means if one rejects a book of his word from the Bible canon they reject God's own voice and have sinned.  Now any writing that does not carry that invincible and perfect authority must be rejected no matter how edifying it may seem. ...


1

Clearly, Paul did expect Timothy to see the "last days". That, and other similar phrases in the NT refer to the last days of the old creation. Note the context of the "new heavens and new earth" passage in Isaiah. God talking to Israel: Behold, my servants shall eat, But you shall be hungry; Behold, my servants shall drink, But you shall be thirsty; ... ...



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