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2 Thessalonians 2:11 - [SBL GNT] καὶ διὰ τοῦτο πέμπειa αὐτοῖς ὁ θεὸς ἐνέργειαν πλάνης εἰς τὸ πιστεῦσαι αὐτοὺς τῷ ψεύδει... [translit] kai dia touto pempeia autois ho theos energeian planēs eis to pisteusai autous tō pseudei... [NRSV] For this reason God sends them a powerful delusion, leading them to believe what is false... a πέμπει pempei = ...


6

I'd argue that that the footnote is not correct, based on the placement of the word hemon (which means "our") Maintaining word order, the Greek text reads: According-to the grace of the God of-us, and of [the] Lord Jesus Christ. If they were the same referent it would be: According to the grace of God and the Lord Jesus Christ of us. This is ...


5

Dr. Robert B. Chisholm, professor of Old Testament Studies at Dallas Theological Seminary, wrote an extensive article on the theme of divine deception within the Hebrew Bible: "Does God Deceive?" Bibliotheca Sacra 155 (1998): 11-28. He cites more than 10 specific examples of divine deception in the Hebrew Bible (for example, see footnote 37 of his article, ...


4

In responding to this question, I at first wish to affirm what @Joseph and @David responded: that the key to understanding the text lies in what comes previously in the chapter, the 'son of perdition/destruction' initiates the strong delusion after the working of Satan. Therefore, one can rightly concur that, It is through this person that the Lord will ...


4

I have checked this verse in a Greek New Testament with an 'apparatus' indicating if there are any differences in original texts that would lend to more than one rendering but there are not any. Therefore it is the same greek sentence in all manuscripts translated by all according to the perceived logic of the sentence alone. In other words this is not one ...


4

This is a great question, in order to answer the question there is a lot to consider with regard to the order of the books. There seems to be a lot of agreement that the letters were sent in the order that we read them in the scriptures, so I won't deal with that, but when I try to see how it could be the other way around (ie. 2 Thes and then 1 Thes) What ...


3

κατα την (the) χαριν (grace) του Θεου (of our God) ημων και (and) Κυριου (of Lord) Ιησου (Jesus) Χριστου (Christ) Wallace demonstrates that Granville Sharp's rule does not come into play here because Ιησου Χριστου is a proper name. As such, του only modifies Θεου and refers to the Father. Literally, "according to the grace of the God of us ..." ...


3

According to Vincent's Word Studies: Temple of God According to some, a figure of the Christian Church. Others, the temple of Jerusalem. Barnes' Notes on the Bible defends the first reading: The phrase "the temple of God" is several times used with reference to the Christian church, 1 Corinthians 3:16, 1 Corinthians 3:17; 2 Corinthians 6:16; ...


3

Preterists might identify him as Nero or some other first century person. Premillenialists are likely to say it is the leader of a reborn Roman empire, or perhaps the pope. Many of the Reformers agreed that it was the pope. That is because Christian tradition from the ealiest times associates this person with the idea of "antichrist." I'm talking about ...


1

What is a Busybody? 2 Thessalonians 3:11 When Paul says, “We hear,” his use of the present tense implies that this is an ongoing problem that the church needed to address. In his presentation of the problem, he uses three present participles, which further illustrates the problem as being perspicuous. What the apostles had heard was that certain ...


1

The context of the rebellion of II Thessalonians chapter two is much debated. I will attempt to provide a solid biblical based answer. The context of II Thessalonians 2:3 is the Second Coming of Christ. I'd like to briefly make mention of two different Bible versions, and their rendering of verse two of this chapter. I'd also like to explain why I feel the ...


1

I'm going to provide an unorthodox perspective for your consideration. Hopefully it is helpful in some way. It was too long for the comments so I'm putting it in an answer. I think to interpret this verse accurately we must first ask "what / who is being held back in verse 7"? Most people assume it's the "mystery of lawlessness" that is being referenced, ...



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