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Your question may confuse some who assume that you are referring to some sort of contextual similarity between the phrase ἡ ἐπαγγελία τῆς παρουσίας αὐτοῦ ("the promise of his presence") in 2 Pet. 3:4 and the phrase ἡ ἀδελφὴ τῆς μητρὸς αὐτου ("the sister of his mother") in John 19:25. However, it seems the only similarity you are referring to is syntactical. ...


2

No Peter does not contradict Amos 2 Peter 3:10-12 "But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night, in which the heavens will pass away with a great noise, and the elements will melt with fervent heat; both the earth and the works that are in it will be burned up. Therefore, since all these things will be dissolved, what manner of persons ought ...


2

With questions like this it is always better to compare the NT with LXX, where you are at least dealing with the same language. The LXX of the Amos passage reads: οὐαὶ οἱ ἐπιθυμοῦντες τὴν ἡμέραν κυρίου As you can see, the verb is different in the two passages. If the author of 2 Peter had intended to contradict Amos one would have expected him to mirror ...


2

One presumptive analysis is to view all the grammatical situations extant in the Greek New Testament (NA28) and Septuagint where the following morphological string occurs: <START> any definite article (in the genitive case) <WITH> any noun (in the genitive case) <WITH> any possessive pronoun (in the ...


1

No, do not think that there is a contradiction because these passages are not speaking of the same day historically or allegorically. Amos was speaking specifically to the house of Israel, the house of Joseph, the northern kingdom of the ten tribes if Israel. (Amos 5) He was writing before their captivity by the Assyrians. Israel's "day" of judgment was ...


1

Are the unlearned and unstable in 2 Pet 3:16 regenerated Christians? 2 Peter 3:16 As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, unto their own destruction. I think Dick Harfield is correct about ...


1

The issue of "regeneration" παλινγενεσίας (palingenesias), is not the issue in this passage; the fact that they are "unlearned and unstable" is not a determinant of the whether or not they have been "washed in the water of regeneration"(Tit. 3:5). Rather, as 1 Pet. 2:3, As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby: ...


1

2 Peter chapter 3 begins by referring to the scoffers asking why Jesus has not yet returned, although the early Christians had expected the return within their lifetimes. The apostle Paul was among those early Christians who believed that Jesus would return in his own lifetime - see for example, 1 Thessalonians 4:17: “the dead in Christ will rise first; ...


1

If the author is not the apostle Peter, we can never establish from the text who the real author was. However, the text can help establish whether Peter or another author wrote this epistle, and if another author then perhaps in what timeframe it was written. I think Susan has dealt with the issue of vocabulary very well, and I would endorse this, noting ...


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From the link posted by Paul Vargas, found here: Our restatement of Sharp’s rule is believed to be true to the nature of the language, and able to address all classes of exceptions that Winstanley raised. The “Sharper” rule is as follows: _ In native Greek constructions (i.e., not translation Greek), when a single article modifies two ...



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