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The term in question is μακροθυμία, elsewhere translated "patience" or "endurance". (See also the related adjective μακρόθυμος and the verb μακροθυμέω). The term is barely attested in pre-Jewish Greek literature (only once in a fragmentary remain from the 4th C. comic Menander1), but is rather common in both its nominal and verbal forms in the LXX and, ...


4

Peter isn't merely saying that Paul uses the word longsuffering frequently. He is referring to Paul's themes along these lines. And not only the theme of God's patience, but the others he has been writing about: A. God's patience in finally fulfilling his promises (v9a): "The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is ...


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From the link posted by Paul Vargas, found here: Our restatement of Sharp’s rule is believed to be true to the nature of the language, and able to address all classes of exceptions that Winstanley raised. The “Sharper” rule is as follows: _ In native Greek constructions (i.e., not translation Greek), when a single article modifies two ...


1

Burton L. Mack, in Who Wrote the New Testament, page 207, says the letters attributed to Peter and Jude have been described together as the catholic epistles (from katholikos, general), because they are addressed to Christians in general, not to a particular congregation. Mack also says they can be discussed together (and with 1 Peter) as ‘Petrine’ ...



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