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7

I believe it would be impossible to give a dogmatic answer on this. However, there are a number of interesting connections to Paul's letters worth considering. What to Look For First we need to establish what to look for. Namely the concept stated in the first part of 2 Pet 3:15: Καὶ τὴν τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν μακροθυμίαν - σωτηρίαν ἡγεῖσθε And the ...


6

The angels mentioned earlier in 2 Peter are evil1 Angels are only explicitly mentioned twice in 2 Peter. The other mention is near the start of the same logical section in verse 4: 4For if God did not spare angels when they sinned, but cast them into hell and committed them to chains of gloomy darkness to be kept until the judgment; ESV If these ...


5

Peter is urging his audience to regard God as 'patient' in regard to bringing about the conclusion of His plan, rather than 'slow', and not to doubt His eventual arrival. The 'scoffers' of earlier in the chapter are questioning whether God[1] will return at all, given the apparent delay: 3knowing this first of all, that scoffers will come in the last ...


5

In this section of 2 Peter, sinful angels are being both compared and contrasted with 'false teachers', who are really the subject of the passage. The NET Bible notes that: Δόξας (doxas) almost certainly refers to angelic beings rather than mere human authorities, though it is difficult to tell whether good or bad angels are in view. Verse 11 seems to ...


5

A Contrary Argument: Seeing the Reference as to Good Angels Jack Douglas laid out some good points to argue for 1 Pet 2:11 to be evil angels. However, I do find some holes and things left unconsidered that for me seem to point to a contrary conclusion. The following is loosely based off both his original set of arguments offered, as well as some of his ...


4

Textual Analysis (My Argument) Contrasting Mere Believers from what Believers are Called to Become I believe the context answers this: v.1 The difference is established in v.1, but it is not "us apostles" and "you (who have obtained a faith of equal standing with ours)." Rather, it is setting up a contrast between "servants [δοῦλος (doúlos)]", willing ...


4

Your question may confuse some who assume that you are referring to some sort of contextual similarity between the phrase ἡ ἐπαγγελία τῆς παρουσίας αὐτοῦ ("the promise of his presence") in 2 Pet. 3:4 and the phrase ἡ ἀδελφὴ τῆς μητρὸς αὐτου ("the sister of his mother") in John 19:25. However, it seems the only similarity you are referring to is syntactical. ...


3

Peace with God bringing Peace within Self Ideas one and three are both present in the context. Peace with God will bring the inner peace, which is the primary focus of the word here. Expand the context to see how this works in 2 Peter 3 (ESV): 9 The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing ...


3

Not Personalities, but God's Glorious Gifts Of δόξας (doxas) v.10 The Greek of 2 Pet 2:10 μάλιστα δὲ τοὺς ὀπίσω σαρκὸς ἐν ἐπιθυμίᾳ μιασμοῦ πορευομένους, καὶ κυριότητος καταφρονοῦντας. Τολμηταί, αὐθάδεις, δόξας οὐ τρέμουσιν βλασφημοῦντες The part in question is the second clause where the accusative noun δόξας is the direct object of what is being ...


3

"Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished:" (2 Peter 3:6 KJV) The key word here is "perished". No one died from a flood before Noah's day. The scripture at Gen. 1:1 describes the earth as being "empty" so there were no people to destroy with floodwater. Also if we look at the context of Peter's word in this verse, we can ...


3

While the preceding verse (5) makes reference to Genesis 1:2, verse 6 itself is referring to the flood of Noah's time, note the connecting word 'later' in the CEV (a version produced by the American Bible society): 5 They will say this because they want to forget that long ago the heavens and the earth were made at God’s command. The earth came out of ...


2

The text says ‘one day is like [or as] a thousand years’—the word ‘like’ (or ‘as’) teach that Lord (κυρίῳ) is outside of time as we know it. Which means for the heavenly beings there is no distinction between a thousand years and a day, therefore the time is just an illlusion. Some people teach that the days of Genesis might be 1000 years. In any ...


2

Is it at all possible that these two books were written completely independent of one another by the individual prompting of the Holy Spirit? From a Christian perspective, the Holy Spirit is indeed the true Author of God's word and merely works through men by divine inspiration (as affirmed by Peter in 2 Peter 1:20-21). Given this, is it not quite feasible ...


1

With questions like this it is always better to compare the NT with LXX, where you are at least dealing with the same language. The LXX of the Amos passage reads: οὐαὶ οἱ ἐπιθυμοῦντες τὴν ἡμέραν κυρίου As you can see, the verb is different in the two passages. If the author of 2 Peter had intended to contradict Amos one would have expected him to mirror ...


1

Are the unlearned and unstable in 2 Pet 3:16 regenerated Christians? 2 Peter 3:16 As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, unto their own destruction. I think Dick Harfield is correct about ...


1

The issue of "regeneration" παλινγενεσίας (palingenesias), is not the issue in this passage; the fact that they are "unlearned and unstable" is not a determinant of the whether or not they have been "washed in the water of regeneration"(Tit. 3:5). Rather, as 1 Pet. 2:3, As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby: ...


1

2 Peter chapter 3 begins by referring to the scoffers asking why Jesus has not yet returned, although the early Christians had expected the return within their lifetimes. The apostle Paul was among those early Christians who believed that Jesus would return in his own lifetime - see for example, 1 Thessalonians 4:17: “the dead in Christ will rise first; ...


1

If the author is not the apostle Peter, we can never establish from the text who the real author was. However, the text can help establish whether Peter or another author wrote this epistle, and if another author then perhaps in what timeframe it was written. I think Susan has dealt with the issue of vocabulary very well, and I would endorse this, noting ...


1

The Idea in Brief Peter acknowledges in his introduction of the epistle that the recipients of his letter know about the Lord. That is, he addresses them as "to those who received a faith the same as ours." However, Peter does not assume that they all therefore know the Lord. That is, he states to them in the same first chapter: "Therefore, brethren, be ...


1

With that citing alone it's very difficult to determine who the first “us” is. What might first help is going back to 1 Peter, such as with 1 Peter 5:1-2, and review what is said there. With that he points out to the elders that unlike them he’d been a witness to Jesus. Since Jesus led him and told him to shepherd the flock (John 21:15), he now tells them ...


1

A 'hypostatic union' is a specific term used in Christian theology to describe the trinity. It is meant simply to state that a being can have different persons under a same essence. In the incarnation, it is less frequently used but then means a being, a Unity, the Christ, exists as a single person 'under' which two distinct natures exist, human and divine. ...



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