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7

I believe it would be impossible to give a dogmatic answer on this. However, there are a number of interesting connections to Paul's letters worth considering. What to Look For First we need to establish what to look for. Namely the concept stated in the first part of 2 Pet 3:15: Καὶ τὴν τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν μακροθυμίαν - σωτηρίαν ἡγεῖσθε And the ...


6

The angels mentioned earlier in 2 Peter are evil1 Angels are only explicitly mentioned twice in 2 Peter. The other mention is near the start of the same logical section in verse 4: 4For if God did not spare angels when they sinned, but cast them into hell and committed them to chains of gloomy darkness to be kept until the judgment; ESV If these ...


6

From my understanding of Strong's and Thayer's, γραφὰς always means, "sacred writings." It does not necessarily imply the entire canon as Christ used the word to refer (presumably) to the Tanach. In addition, it does not even imply which canon is to be trusted (as there were several present at that time). All of that being said, I think it is fairly safe to ...


6

Peter almost certainly didn't think of canonicity the way we do today. As Ignatius Theophorus points out, the Greek word (as used by New Testament writers) refers to sacred writings. In its most common use among early Christians, the word γραφὰς referred to those writings that could be read in church; however, Clement, bishop of Rome in the late first ...


5

It is often believed that the author of the second book references the first book. This is based on both using otherwise rare words (such as "multiply" in Jude 2 being used in 1 Peter 1:2 and 2 Peter 1:2) and themes ("our common salvation" in Jude 3 and "a faith of the same kind as ours" in 2 Peter 1:2). Whether Jude quotes 2 Peter or 2 Peter uses content ...


5

Most readers notice the connection between Jude 6 and 2 Peter 2.4, but the similarities go beyond that. Second Peter has a lot more material in between some of the parallels, but the two epistles actually touch on much of the same subject matter, in the same order: Jude 1 = 2 Peter 1.2 Jude 4-5 = 2 Peter 2.1 Jude 6-10 = 2 Peter 2.4-12 Jude 12-13 = 2 Peter ...


5

In this section of 2 Peter, sinful angels are being both compared and contrasted with 'false teachers', who are really the subject of the passage. The NET Bible notes that: Δόξας (doxas) almost certainly refers to angelic beings rather than mere human authorities, though it is difficult to tell whether good or bad angels are in view. Verse 11 seems to ...


5

A Contrary Argument: Seeing the Reference as to Good Angels Jack Douglas laid out some good points to argue for 1 Pet 2:11 to be evil angels. However, I do find some holes and things left unconsidered that for me seem to point to a contrary conclusion. The following is loosely based off both his original set of arguments offered, as well as some of his ...


4

Textual Analysis (My Argument) Contrasting Mere Believers from what Believers are Called to Become I believe the context answers this: v.1 The difference is established in v.1, but it is not "us apostles" and "you (who have obtained a faith of equal standing with ours)." Rather, it is setting up a contrast between "servants [δοῦλος (doúlos)]", willing ...


4

Peter is urging his audience to regard God as 'patient' in regard to bringing about the conclusion of His plan, rather than 'slow', and not to doubt His eventual arrival. The 'scoffers' of earlier in the chapter are questioning whether God[1] will return at all, given the apparent delay: 3knowing this first of all, that scoffers will come in the last ...


3

Peace with God bringing Peace within Self Ideas one and three are both present in the context. Peace with God will bring the inner peace, which is the primary focus of the word here. Expand the context to see how this works in 2 Peter 3 (ESV): 9 The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing ...


3

While the preceding verse (5) makes reference to Genesis 1:2, verse 6 itself is referring to the flood of Noah's time, note the connecting word 'later' in the CEV (a version produced by the American Bible society): 5 They will say this because they want to forget that long ago the heavens and the earth were made at God’s command. The earth came out of ...


3

2 Pet 2 and Jude are very similar, both in structure, language, and themes. These two are parallel passages (cf. e.g. this site): Jude 8-9: Yet in like manner these people also, relying on their dreams, defile the flesh, reject authority, and blaspheme the glorious ones. But when the archangel Michael, contending with the devil, was disputing about the ...


3

Not Personalities, but God's Glorious Gifts Of δόξας (doxas) v.10 The Greek of 2 Pet 2:10 μάλιστα δὲ τοὺς ὀπίσω σαρκὸς ἐν ἐπιθυμίᾳ μιασμοῦ πορευομένους, καὶ κυριότητος καταφρονοῦντας. Τολμηταί, αὐθάδεις, δόξας οὐ τρέμουσιν βλασφημοῦντες The part in question is the second clause where the accusative noun δόξας is the direct object of what is being ...


3

After thinking about it some more, there is a medium strength argument to be made that Peter here supports any letter submitted by Paul under his ministry, past or future. It is an argument not directly from the text, but from omission. In other words, Peter says that people twist Paul’s writings, in the same way that they do scripture. He does not logically ...


3

That's difficult to say. There are indications that Paul thought his letters were not to be taken as "gospel": But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach to you a gospel contrary to the one we preached to you, let him be accursed. As we have said before, so now I say again: If anyone is preaching to you a gospel contrary to the one you ...


3

The phrase "of Scripture" here is intended to distinguish between prophecies belonging to Scripture and prophecies belonging to the false prophets who are excoriated beginning in 2 Peter 2:1. The genitive "of Scripture" can be taken to mean: "prophecy about Scripture" (similar to the form "a prophecy of Jesus' death") "prophecy belonging to Scripture" ...


2

ταρταρώσας is defined as: ταρταρόω (Τάρταρος ‘the Netherworld’) 1 aor. ἐταρτάρωσα (Acusilaus Hist. [V B.C.]: 2 Fgm. 8 Jac. I p. 50; Lydus, Men. 4, 158 p. 174, 26 W.; cp. Sext. Emp., Pyrrh. Hypot. 3, 24, 210 ὁ Ζεὺς τὸν Κρόνον κατεταρτάρωσεν [this compound several times in Ps.—Apollod.: 1, 1, 4; 1, 2, 1, 2; 1, 2, 3]. Tartarus, thought of by the ...


2

Is it at all possible that these two books were written completely independent of one another by the individual prompting of the Holy Spirit? From a Christian perspective, the Holy Spirit is indeed the true Author of God's word and merely works through men by divine inspiration (as affirmed by Peter in 2 Peter 1:20-21). Given this, is it not quite feasible ...


2

From Wikipedia, the Papyri containing 2 Peter are: P72 (circa 300, also contains 1 Peter, Jude, and several apocryphal writings) P74 (circa 650, missing chapter 1, also contains Acts, 1 Peter, and 1-3 John) The Uncials containing 2 Peter are 4th century: א, B 5th century: A, 048. 6th century: 0156 (Chapter 3), 0247 (Chapter 1) 7th century: 0209 9th ...


2

"Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished:" (2 Peter 3:6 KJV) The key word here is "perished". No one died from a flood before Noah's day. The scripture at Gen. 1:1 describes the earth as being "empty" so there were no people to destroy with floodwater. Also if we look at the context of Peter's word in this verse, we can ...


2

The text says ‘one day is like [or as] a thousand years’—the word ‘like’ (or ‘as’) teach that Lord (κυρίῳ) is outside of time as we know it. Which means for the heavenly beings there is no distinction between a thousand years and a day, therefore the time is just an illlusion. Some people teach that the days of Genesis might be 1000 years. In any ...


2

A 'hypostatic union' is a specific term used in Christian theology to describe the trinity. It is meant simply to state that a being can have different persons under a same essence. In the incarnation, it is less frequently used but then means a being, a Unity, the Christ, exists as a single person 'under' which two distinct natures exist, human and divine. ...


1

The Idea in Brief Peter acknowledges in his introduction of the epistle that the recipients of his letter know about the Lord. That is, he addresses them as "to those who received a faith the same as ours." However, Peter does not assume that they all therefore know the Lord. That is, he states to them in the same first chapter: "Therefore, brethren, be ...


1

With that citing alone it's very difficult to determine who the first “us” is. What might first help is going back to 1 Peter, such as with 1 Peter 5:1-2, and review what is said there. With that he points out to the elders that unlike them he’d been a witness to Jesus. Since Jesus led him and told him to shepherd the flock (John 21:15), he now tells them ...


1

This concept is fascinating, and a short survey of some New Testament will shed light on the questions at hand. First, the word "nature" in the New Testament is the Greek noun, φύσις, which occurs with the following connotations as follows: (1) The "nature" of heterosexuality (Rom 1:26-27) (2) The "nature" of dictates of the conscience (Rom 2:14) (3) The ...


1

As best I can tell, there is no major difference in the wording seen in the oldest extant manuscripts dated closest to any original text of 2 Peter. Specifically: P72 (ca. 275-325 CE) shows ΠΑΡΑΚΥΡΙΟΥΒΛΑΣΦΗΜΟΝΚΡΙΣΙΝ (παρα κυριου βλασφημον κρισιν), and similarly, codex Vaticanus (ca. 325-375 CE) reads ΠΑΡΑΚ̅ WΒΛΑΣΦΗΜΟΝΚΡΙϲῙ (παρα κω βλασφημον κρισι̅ ). ...


1

As I understand the Greek plural noun ΔΟΞΑΣ (δόξας/doxas), it doesn't refer to a WHO, but to a WHAT. Have you ever sung the Doxology? ΔΟΞΑΣ (δόξας) can also be translated to read dignity, glory, honor, praise, worship, and the like (see Strong's G1391). And in 2 Peter 2:10b-11, it refers to glorious heavenly beings thought to be angels; i.e.: "Whereas ...


1

Whether Paul anticipated that his letters would be collected together in the form we have them today we cannot know for sure (as he does not tell us). However I think it is clear that Paul believed that he was carried along by the Holy Spirit as he wrote his letters - this is indicated explicitly in 1 Corinthians 7:40 Yet in my judgment she is happier if ...



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