Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Regarding "key differences": When one battles, one has also encountered - no issue. When one engages, one has also met - no issue. When one is said to have been killed "by" a commander of troops, that does not mean one was necessarily killed directly by that commander. It can just as easily have been by the troops that were under his command. For example, ...


10

Read in isolation, 2 Kings 4:38-41 can be understood as a story about a foul tasting soup that Elisha improved by adding a new flavor. However, the context in II Kings is miracles performed by Elisha to save people from death by famine. From within that context it seems that the "death in the pot," was an actual danger that required Elisha's intervention. ...


9

This is indeed a fascinating and cryptic statement... As was pointed out above, this phrase actually occurs twice: earlier, as Elijah was ascending to heaven, Elisha sees "a chariot of fire and horses of fire" (II Kings 2:11), and then cries out, "My father, my father! The chariot[s] of Israel and its horsemen!". Biblical scholars and commentators have ...


9

Rabbi Elchanan Samet has a book called Pirkei Elisha about all the Elisha stories in II Kings. In that book, Rabbi Samet is making one basic argument: there isn't a single Elisha story that is intended to show: "Elisha can do magic." Through a careful literary and historical reading of each story, Rabbi Samet tries to show how broad social implications and ...


8

Before anything, though, I must say that no, king Joash would not know that he must strike the ground five or six times. But, he really should have did that. All verse emphasis mine. First of all, we would have to look at the reason why Elisha would be angry at an answer to a seemingly minuscule command, 2 Kings 13:14 (NKJV) 14 Elisha had become ...


7

They were looking intently up into the sky as he was going, when suddenly two men dressed in white stood beside them. “Men of Galilee,” they said, “why do you stand here looking into the sky? This same Jesus, who has been taken from you into heaven, will come back in the same way you have seen him go into heaven.” (NIV ACTS 1:9-11) I have always ...


6

NASA interprets the passage: ...tells of an "accidental" sundial, in which the number of steps covered by the Sun's shadow on a staircase was used to measure the passage of time. In that story, the shadow miraculously retreated ten steps on the staircase built by King Ahaz. The word translated "steps" also is translated as "degrees" (likely ...


5

The Idea in Brief According to the Hebrew Bible, there are at least two people who have ascended into heaven: Enoch and Elijah. In the Christian New Testament, Jesus made the emphatic statement that no one (οὐδεὶς) had ever ascended into heaven with the exception of the one who had descended from heaven: that is, Jesus himself, who was to be "lifted up" ...


4

What does aman mean when it doesn't mean “faith/belief”? But Moses' hands were heavy; and they took a stone and put it under him, and he sat thereon. And Aaron and Hur held up his hands, the one on the one side and the other on the other side; and his hands were steady (emunah, אמונה) until the going down of the sun. -Exodus 17:12, KJV The ...


4

The translation problem in II Kings 5:10 is that what starts out as a declarative sentence ends in what most commentators read as an imperative form, "va'tahar" (וטהר), "be pure!", as in "be healthy!". This makes the verse sound a little clumsy in Hebrew, as if Elisha said: "Go and wash in the Jordan seven times, and thy flesh shall come back to thee, ...


4

The location of Gilgal is crucial in this response - the Gilgal mentioned in the battles of Joshua is most likely not the same location as that mentioned in the travels of Elijah and Elisha. The maps below show the different proposed locations of each. Map showing travels of Elijah and Elisha: Map showing battles of Jericho and Ai: According to the ...


4

The phenomenon described in II Kings 3:20-23 is well known in the area. Rain can fall in the higher areas such as Edom (now Jordan) or in the Judean hills while down in the Jordan valley on either side of the river, the sky is clear and sunny. When this happens, the wadis (gulleys) that drain the uplands erupt suddenly in flash floods that endanger ...


4

Interesting answers... Looking at the Hebrew (and some other translations), I would hazard that another accurate translation would be something like: Thus says Hizqiyyahu: This day is a day of distress, and of reproach, and of disgrace. For the children have come to the moment of breaking, but there is not enough strength for birthing. So it's not a ...


4

The Hebrew word translated as "bald" as in II Kings 2v23 is used in only one other place in the Old Testament: Lev 13:40 And the man whose hair is fallen off his head, he is bald; yet is he clean. This is clearly referring to male-pattern baldness and not a shaved head which was associated with taking a vow (e.g. the Nazarite in Num 6.) Apart from ...


3

The word נַעַר (na’ar), here translated "boy," has a broad range of meaning. It can refer to infants all the way up to adolescence. However, קטנ (qatan meaning "small"), used with it, limits the age. The exact phrase, "small boys" appears in the following verses (all from the NET Bible): 1 Sam 20:35 The next morning Jonathan, along with a young servant, ...


3

Placing one's garments on the ground for another to ride or walk on is a sign of subservience to the walker*. This can also be seen in the triumphal entry (Matthew 21:7-8; Mark 11:7-8; Luke 19:35-36; John 12:12-15). Matthew 21:7 They brought the donkey and the colt, placed their cloaks on them, and Jesus sat on them. Matthew 21:8 A very large crowd ...


3

It's a proverbial expression but can be understood at face value. If a mother doesn't have the strength to deliver her child, it becomes a very dangerous situation for both her and the child. This would certainly be a cause for distress, as the child and mother are likely to die (or the mother is already dead). In this context it means they are in great ...


3

Both "turning to the Lord" and "holding fast to the Lord" seem to be common expressions of obeying God's commands (cf. Deut. 30:10; Deut. 30:20), so it doesn't appear that there is necessarily any difference in the sort of thing for which these two kings are commended. However, the author of these passages probably does not intend to make a statement about ...


3

The word in Hebrew, verse 40, is maveth. It means death, as in pestilence. It is used in the Bible where death and destruction is conveyed as a meaning. It's not talking about bitterness. The message is, the prophet intervenes for these men due to Yahweh's mercy. Ref.: Gesenius's Lexicon of Hebrew and English and my knowledge of Hebrew.


3

Synchronisms between the reigns of the northern and southern kingdoms (Israel and Judah) are all affected by an apparent discrepancy of a few years. The case of Joash’s 23rd year is particularly affected, but the basic reason is the same as other kings. It relates to whether a kingdom uses the 'accessional' or 'non-accessional' method of dating. In both ...


3

There is no problem here. Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus. Jesus knows that Nicodemus has great knowledge of the scriptures. Jesus pulls from Proverbs 30:4 to speak of the lack of understanding Nicodemus is having. 4 Who has ascended to heaven and come down? Who has gathered the wind in his fists? Who has wrapped up the waters in a garment? Who has ...


3

In Keil and Delitzsch's Commentary,(2 Kings 2) The request of Elisha is evidently based upon Deu 21:17, where בּ פּי־שׁנים denotes the double portion which the first-born received in (of) the father's inheritance, as R. Levi b. Gers., Seb. Mnst., Vatabl., Grot., and others have perceived, and as Hengstenberg (Beitrr. ii. p. 133f.) in our days ...


3

Note that when it comes to literal versus figurative use of language, it does not matter what the language is. In other words, there is nothing inherent in the Hebrew language versus the English language that helps determine if a word, phrase, or clause should be taken literally or figuratively. Rather, context of a statement, in any language, is primarily ...


2

A wild gourd is just that. A gourd which grows in the wild. It would be difficult to say which species of gourd it might be though. "There was no more death in the pot" has also been translated "there was no more bitterness in the pot" or "there was no more harm in the pot". Starch, by my understanding, does have the ability to mitigate certain bitterness ...


2

I've read the passage again in NIV and it's pretty clear from that translation that this is an image of "distress and rebuke and disgrace". That is the similarity between when a child can't be delivered because of missing strength and the Assyrian threat is over the city. I didn't notice this because none of the common translation in my native language ...


2

@Richard A bit of reading of some commentators on the subject does indicate that pride is the cause. A significant emissary was visiting King Hezekiah and it appears that by showing the Babylonians everything he had, Hezekiah was trying to impress them - putting stock in his relationship with them, over his relationship with God. He should have shown more ...


2

The evidence, and the consensus of critical scholars, is that the Deuteronomic History (Joshua, Judges, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings and 2 Kings), written before the Babylonian Exile, was the main source for the Book of Chronicles (now 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles), but that the author of Chronicles probably had other material available as well. Chronicles ...


2

Then the king of Moab took his oldest son, who would have been the next king, and sacrificed him as a burnt offering on the wall. So there was great anger against Israel, and the Israelites withdrew and returned to their own land. (2 Kings 3:27, NLT) I'd interpret this as saying that the king sacrificed his son which then fuelled the rage of the ...


2

We're not told where he was. It's possible that Elisha was still in Damascus when he gave this message, since that is where he was the last time he was mentioned by the author (2 Kings 8:7). I don't think this is likely, given that Elisha is giving a message to one of the sons of the prophets, and its doubtful that this Jewish school had a branch in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible