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10

Rabbi Elchanan Samet has a book called Pirkei Elisha about all the Elisha stories in II Kings. In that book, Rabbi Samet is making one basic argument: there isn't a single Elisha story that is intended to show: "Elisha can do magic." Through a careful literary and historical reading of each story, Rabbi Samet tries to show how broad social implications and ...


9

This is indeed a fascinating and cryptic statement... As was pointed out above, this phrase actually occurs twice: earlier, as Elijah was ascending to heaven, Elisha sees "a chariot of fire and horses of fire" (II Kings 2:11), and then cries out, "My father, my father! The chariot[s] of Israel and its horsemen!". Biblical scholars and commentators have ...


8

Read in isolation, 2 Kings 4:38-41 can be understood as a story about a foul tasting soup that Elisha improved by adding a new flavor. However, the context in II Kings is miracles performed by Elisha to save people from death by famine. From within that context it seems that the "death in the pot," was an actual danger that required Elisha's intervention. ...


7

They were looking intently up into the sky as he was going, when suddenly two men dressed in white stood beside them. “Men of Galilee,” they said, “why do you stand here looking into the sky? This same Jesus, who has been taken from you into heaven, will come back in the same way you have seen him go into heaven.” (NIV ACTS 1:9-11) I have always ...


7

The text describes them differently, so perhaps each was the best ever at a particular thing but those things are different: Hezekiah "held fast to the Lord and did not cease to follow him" Josiah "turned to the Lord...with all his heart and with all his soul and with all his strength" Hezekiah is a dedicated servant; Josiah is committed ...


6

NASA interprets the passage: ...tells of an "accidental" sundial, in which the number of steps covered by the Sun's shadow on a staircase was used to measure the passage of time. In that story, the shadow miraculously retreated ten steps on the staircase built by King Ahaz. The word translated "steps" also is translated as "degrees" (likely ...


6

Regarding "key differences": When one battles, one has also encountered - no issue. When one engages, one has also met - no issue. When one is said to have been killed "by" a commander of troops, that does not mean one was necessarily killed directly by that commander. It can just as easily have been by the troops that were under his command. For example, ...


5

The word here is עֲלֵה , which usually means "arise" or "go up". This is the same root that is used for the burnt offering, called the olah because its sweet savor rises heavenward. It is also the word used in Elijah's ascent. But we see that in many translations of the 36 uses of this verb in Tanakh, it is also used to refer to going to other places, and ...


4

What does aman mean when it doesn't mean “faith/belief”? But Moses' hands were heavy; and they took a stone and put it under him, and he sat thereon. And Aaron and Hur held up his hands, the one on the one side and the other on the other side; and his hands were steady (emunah, אמונה) until the going down of the sun. -Exodus 17:12, KJV The ...


4

Interesting answers... Looking at the Hebrew (and some other translations), I would hazard that another accurate translation would be something like: Thus says Hizqiyyahu: This day is a day of distress, and of reproach, and of disgrace. For the children have come to the moment of breaking, but there is not enough strength for birthing. So it's not a ...


4

The translation problem in II Kings 5:10 is that what starts out as a declarative sentence ends in what most commentators read as an imperative form, "va'tahar" (וטהר), "be pure!", as in "be healthy!". This makes the verse sound a little clumsy in Hebrew, as if Elisha said: "Go and wash in the Jordan seven times, and thy flesh shall come back to thee, ...


4

The location of Gilgal is crucial in this response - the Gilgal mentioned in the battles of Joshua is most likely not the same location as that mentioned in the travels of Elijah and Elisha. The maps below show the different proposed locations of each. Map showing travels of Elijah and Elisha: Map showing battles of Jericho and Ai: According to the ...


4

The Hebrew word translated as "bald" as in II Kings 2v23 is used in only one other place in the Old Testament: Lev 13:40 And the man whose hair is fallen off his head, he is bald; yet is he clean. This is clearly referring to male-pattern baldness and not a shaved head which was associated with taking a vow (e.g. the Nazarite in Num 6.) Apart from ...


3

The word נַעַר (na’ar), here translated "boy," has a broad range of meaning. It can refer to infants all the way up to adolescence. However, קטנ (qatan meaning "small"), used with it, limits the age. The exact phrase, "small boys" appears in the following verses (all from the NET Bible): 1 Sam 20:35 The next morning Jonathan, along with a young servant, ...


3

Placing one's garments on the ground for another to ride or walk on is a sign of subservience to the walker*. This can also be seen in the triumphal entry (Matthew 21:7-8; Mark 11:7-8; Luke 19:35-36; John 12:12-15). Matthew 21:7 They brought the donkey and the colt, placed their cloaks on them, and Jesus sat on them. Matthew 21:8 A very large crowd ...


3

Rashi asks this question, and he argues that because they are obviously the same person, there must have been a name change: In the twenty-seventh year of Jeroboam: Is it possible to say so? Did not Uzziah and Jeroboam reign simultaneously, as I explained shortly before this (14:22)? What, then, is the meaning of the verse, “In the twenty seventh year of ...


3

It's a proverbial expression but can be understood at face value. If a mother doesn't have the strength to deliver her child, it becomes a very dangerous situation for both her and the child. This would certainly be a cause for distress, as the child and mother are likely to die (or the mother is already dead). In this context it means they are in great ...


3

Both "turning to the Lord" and "holding fast to the Lord" seem to be common expressions of obeying God's commands (cf. Deut. 30:10; Deut. 30:20), so it doesn't appear that there is necessarily any difference in the sort of thing for which these two kings are commended. However, the author of these passages probably does not intend to make a statement about ...


2

The word in Hebrew, verse 40, is maveth. It means death, as in pestilence. It is used in the Bible where death and destruction is conveyed as a meaning. It's not talking about bitterness. The message is, the prophet intervenes for these men due to Yahweh's mercy. Ref.: Gesenius's Lexicon of Hebrew and English and my knowledge of Hebrew.


2

A wild gourd is just that. A gourd which grows in the wild. It would be difficult to say which species of gourd it might be though. "There was no more death in the pot" has also been translated "there was no more bitterness in the pot" or "there was no more harm in the pot". Starch, by my understanding, does have the ability to mitigate certain bitterness ...


2

I've read the passage again in NIV and it's pretty clear from that translation that this is an image of "distress and rebuke and disgrace". That is the similarity between when a child can't be delivered because of missing strength and the Assyrian threat is over the city. I didn't notice this because none of the common translation in my native language ...


2

The evidence, and the consensus of critical scholars, is that the Deuteronomic History (Joshua, Judges, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings and 2 Kings), written before the Babylonian Exile, was the main source for the Book of Chronicles (now 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles), but that the author of Chronicles probably had other material available as well. Chronicles ...


2

@Richard A bit of reading of some commentators on the subject does indicate that pride is the cause. A significant emissary was visiting King Hezekiah and it appears that by showing the Babylonians everything he had, Hezekiah was trying to impress them - putting stock in his relationship with them, over his relationship with God. He should have shown more ...


1

Then the king of Moab took his oldest son, who would have been the next king, and sacrificed him as a burnt offering on the wall. So there was great anger against Israel, and the Israelites withdrew and returned to their own land. (2 Kings 3:27, NLT) I'd interpret this as saying that the king sacrificed his son which then fuelled the rage of the ...


1

Great question! The short answer is: It depends on what you mean by "reign." If you count a co-regency then Jehoram king of Judah began ~1 year prior. If you only count the years he reigned as head honcho, then Jehoram king of Israel began ~5 years prior. It was very common in those days for a king to hand off his reign to his son through a co-regency. ...


1

Clarke seems to have a good quote to borrow on the matter. According to him the Chaldee translates 2 Kings 2:12 (where Elisha uses the same phrase with respect to Elijah) as: "My master, my master! who, by thy intercession, wast of more use to Israel than horses and chariots." This seems to make sense. Basically Elisha looked upon Elijah as his spiritual ...


1

I think Elisha was rebuking not only the actions of Gehazi, but also the attitude of his heart. Gehazi accepted two talents of silver and two changes of clothes. Although opinion varies as to how much a talent weighed (maybe 25-35kg), it was certainly a lot of money. Perhaps, as he walked back, he was thinking about what he could do with such a large sum: ...


1

Verse 5 is the King of Aram talking. It is a cliche / convention that King 'a' refers to King 'b' as 'The King of X'. Once the pattern is set, the narrative sticks with it. It has nothing to do with whether the king in question is good or bad. It is also possible that this story was once told as 'once upon a time ...' and wasn't actually tied to a ...


1

This story is very profound. It is interesting that manslaughter is typified through the dislocated ax head. That is, we read in the Law of Moses as follows. Deuteronomy 19:4-6 (NASB) 4 Now this is the case of the manslayer who may flee there and live: when he kills his friend unintentionally, not hating him previously— 5 as when a man goes into the ...


1

Hezekiah's Sin Did Hezekiah sin in this matter? Quite simply, yes. God would not come and pronounce judgment on him in response if he had not sinned. But what was his sin? What ought he to have done instead? The OP wrongly insinuates that his sin was to receive the Babylonians; rather it was the manner in which he received them. Joel Beeke and James La ...



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