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8

The simple answer to the question is: we don't know specifically. So what do we know? He refers to it as an "weakness" or infirmity, as you have it. It's the word astheneia in Greek. The same word is used in both places in 12:9. This "thorn in the flesh" is probably not a reference to the idea of the flesh as the sinful nature, but more likely something ...


7

In the preceding and following verses, Paul talks about something 'written with ink', '[written] on tablets of stone', 'the letter', 'the ministry of death, carved on tablets of stone', 'the ministry of condemnation', and 'the old covenant / Moses' which has a 'veil'. These are all in contrast to '[written] with the spirit of the living God', '[written] on ...


7

There are a couple of different ways to answer your first question. I will attempt an answer from a linguistics perspective, specifically with regards to the lexical aspect of the verb in question. The dominant perspective on lexical aspect of verb tenses for the last few decades has been Actionsart. This deals with how the verb interacts with time. ...


6

Two viable and not necessary mutually exclusive interpretations can be offered which result in the same theological conclusion. Sky, Space, Heaven I heard R.C. Sproul suggest that first heaven would denote the sky, second heaven deep space, and third heaven the presence of God. Ted Donnelly takes this interpretation in his book Biblical Teachings on the ...


6

Well, Yes and No. If we look a couple verses down we read this: 2 Corinthians 9:10-11 (NIV) 10 Now he who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will also supply and increase your store of seed and will enlarge the harvest of your righteousness. 11 You will be enriched in every way so that you can be generous on every occasion, and through us ...


6

I have not found any commentators who directly mention that the Corinthians rejected Paul's recommendations or teaching, rather only that they rejected his style. Colin Kruse in the Tyndale NT Commentaries says: In this central section of the letter Paul appeals to the Corinthians to be reconciled to God and open their hearts to their apostle. He clears ...


4

I cannot provide the exact cultural implications at the moment, but the third heaven has traditionally been taken as "into the very presence of God." This certainly was the position advocated by Aquinas as well as Augustine.


4

Here is the Greek phrase in question: δι' (through) ἐσόπτρου (a mirror) ἐν (in) αἰνίγματι (obscurity) When we look this it seems to lend to the idea of a glass window that has an opaque view, but the actual meaning of ἐσόπτρου seems to be a mirror as shown in the other occurrence of this word by James, who says: Anyone who listens to the word but does ...


4

καταλλάγητε is the 2nd plural aorist passive imperative of καταλλάσσω. Breaking this down, 2nd plural is you (all) "y'all." Passive makes the subject of the verb the recipient of the action. Imperatives are commands and aorist imperatives generally indicate a command to start something. So what would "we reconcile them" look like? καταλλάσoμεν αὐτοῦς. ...


4

This does not seem plausible given the assumptions in the theory. It appears that the Corinthians were quite eager to vindicate themselves. This theory appears to be making the assumption that the letter(s) of 2 Corinthians is/are largely in response to 1 Corinthians (which is a possibility). A few observations 1 Corinthians isn't actually the first ...


3

I propose that "the letter of the law" is meant to indicate any [finite] approximation of Law, whereas "the spirit of the law" is meant to indicate Law itself—how things actually work, down to the smallest detail. We read in Romans 10:4, For Christ is the telos of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes. The translations of telos are ...


2

I understand this to mean that, while Jesus was (and is) perfect, He was made sin for a time for us on the cross. That is, He took the punishment that bought us peace upon Himself, so that we (who are born again) are not punished for our sins. Even more scandalous, we take on His righteousness, the righteousness of God! No wonder Grace is called Amazing!


2

I would first like to offer one passage in the New Testament that effectively answers both the issue of intermarriage between Israel and Gentiles, as well as the state of the Torah of Moshe. In Ephesians 2:14-16, the apostle Paulos wrote, 14 For he is our peace, who made both, one, and destroyed the middle-wall of the fence, 15 when he abolished the ...


2

Does God really forget our sins? The Bible never says that God will "forget" out sins, rather we are told that God will not remember them. Forgetting is passive; like forgetting where you put the car keys. Forgetting is not done deliberately. However, when God declares that he will "not remember" our sins, that is active. The word "remember" (זָכַר) ...


1

The Greek word ἁμαρτίαν (hamartian) is the accusative case, singular number declension of the noun ἁμαρτία (hamartia), a feminine gender noun. It occurs 174 times in the King James Version wherein it is translated as follows (according to blueletterbible.org): sin (172x) sinful (1x) offense (1x) In Heb. 10:6, it is actually translated as "sacrifices for ...


1

Thorn in the Flesh is an idiom, found in Scripture, with which Paul, as a Pharisee, would have been well acquainted. In all of its Scriptural occurrences, this idiom is used to refer to people who harass: Numbers 33:55 But if you do not drive out the inhabitants of the land from before you, then it shall be that those whom you let remain shall be ...


1

Your question is really about the meaning of the English word “remember”. “Remember” can be the opposite of “forget”, but is also used simply to mean “think about, ponder, bear in mind”. To say that God will “not remember” your sins does not mean that he will forget them, but simply that he will not hold them against you. The usage of “remember” in old and ...


1

The New Testament actually commonly refers to the devil as a prince or god of this world. For example: Now is the time for judgment on this world; now the prince of this world will be driven out. (NIV, John 12:31) I will not say much more to you, for the prince of this world is coming. He has no hold over me (NIV, John 14:30) Again, the devil ...


1

Here's an excerpt from a post I made on Mi Yoedya. I figured it applied here as well. In 1 Corinthians 13:12, the apostle Paul wrote, βλέπομεν γὰρ ἄρτι δι᾽ ἐσόπτρου ἐν αἰνίγματι τότε δὲ πρόσωπον πρὸς πρόσωπον ἄρτι γινώσκω ἐκ μέρους τότε δὲ ἐπιγνώσομαι καθὼς καὶ ἐπεγνώσθην I would like for you to notice a couple of words: ἐσόπτρου, αἰνίγματι, πρόσωπον ...


1

Consider one of the goats on the Day of Atonement (Yom ha-Kippurim). In Lev. 16:21-22, it is written, 21 And Aharon shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live goat and confess over it all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat, and he shall send it away by ...



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