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I don't think a "concrete," "certain," answer can be given ... However, perhaps there is a plausible explanation given the period, and given cultures at work: Titus, Timothy, Galatians, had notable issues regarding Gentile Christians and the controversy of Pharasaic/Rabbinic doctrines and traditions being taught in the Churches. In view of this, it ...


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In Rom 1:8-10, Paul's blessing refers to the strong faith of the Romans; in 1 Cor 1:4-6 likewise, as Paul thanks God for their faith; 2 Cor 1:2-7 differs only in that the blessing is in the form of words of comfort; 1 Thess 2-4 is again gives thanks for their faith. Compare this to Galatians, where Paul wishes the Galatians well (Gal 1:2) but omits the ...


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I'm not sure of its significance, but I would imagine that part of it may be to do with what was happening at the time. Galatians is believed to have been his second letter, when he was ministering in about 49AD, while Titus and 1 Timothy were in about 63AD, post-Acts, wherein he was able to see his martyring coming, and was associated with the brevity in ...


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First let us look at what is commonly held as the closest translation to the word 'Arsenokoitēs'. St. John The Faster is one of the most modern usages of the word, in which he used to refer to anal sex between both women and men. It was not an exclusively homosexual act. http://www.holytrinitymission.org/books/english/canons_fathers_rudder.htm#_Toc78634065 ...


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Although there are differing views on what follows, the most convincing explanation I've heard regarding this reference centres around the nature of the culture Timothy was contending with at Ephesus. For many years, Ephesus had been an entrenched and powerful centre of the cult of Ephesian Artemis - her temple was one of the seven ancient wonders of the ...



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