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The Greek is unambiguously referring to the church, not God. The word church (ἐκκλησία) is nominative case; the word God is in the genitive case (modifying the word church). The two words pillar (στῦλος) and ground (ἑδραίωμα ) are also nominative case, showing that they are in apposition to the church, not God. The Greek cases match each other when in an ...


2

The author(s) of the pastoral letters only provides a few details about his opponents, including: They believe 'myths', 'irreverent, silly myths', and 'Jewish myths' (1 Timothy 1.4; 4.7; Second Timothy 4.4; Titus 1.14) They speculate and have vain discussions (1 Timothy 1.4,6) They desire to be teachers of the law/Torah (1 Timothy 1.7) They forbid marriage ...


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The term Paul used that is translated 'homosexual(s)' came directly from the two Greek words in the Greek translation of the Levitical passage (i.e. the Septuagint, which Paul quoted regularly) condemning homosexuality. Paul "coined" the compound word, but it did not come from a vacuum. The Septuagint's translation of the Levitical passage says, in effect, ...


2

It seems that many people want to quote the lexicon and be on there way, however in this case the lexicon does not tell the whole story. While the lexicon clearly indicates that the word Arsenokoites came to mean sodomy, it is not at all clear that this is what Paul meant it to mean. Unfortunately, this word has no established context prior to Paul's use of ...


2

Evangelist You, however, be self-controlled in all things, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry. 2 Timothy 4:5. This scripture identifies this gift as that of Evangelist, which is the same gift in Ephesians 4:11. In context of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus (and the work that Paul instructed them to carry out) it is clear we in ...


2

In Rom 1:8-10, Paul's blessing refers to the strong faith of the Romans; in 1 Cor 1:4-6 likewise, as Paul thanks God for their faith; 2 Cor 1:2-7 differs only in that the blessing is in the form of words of comfort; 1 Thess 2-4 is again gives thanks for their faith. Compare this to Galatians, where Paul wishes the Galatians well (Gal 1:2) but omits the ...


2

Although there are differing views on what follows, the most convincing explanation I've heard regarding this reference centres around the nature of the culture Timothy was contending with at Ephesus. For many years, Ephesus had been an entrenched and powerful centre of the cult of Ephesian Artemis - her temple was one of the seven ancient wonders of the ...


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I don't think a "concrete," "certain," answer can be given ... However, perhaps there is a plausible explanation given the period, and given cultures at work: Titus, Timothy, Galatians, had notable issues regarding Gentile Christians and the controversy of Pharasaic/Rabbinic doctrines and traditions being taught in the Churches. In view of this, it ...


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"My question posed here, [which] is about the historical context of Luke and Paul's relationship, and how that relationship might or might not have affected the textual relationships of the writings attributed to them." Undoubtedly, Paul and Luke had a working relationship - Paul himself says so - and therefore the assumption in note 1 should go ...


1

An examination of Greek compound words used to translate Hebrew may be especially helpful in sorting the meaning of Paul’s αρσενοκοίτης (arsenokoites). In using this apparent neologism – only extant in 1Cor.6:9, 1Tim.1:10, and in references back to these verses – Paul seems to have purposely avoided the available Greek vocabulary for idolatry, prostitution, ...


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You might be interested to know that 1 Tim 1:7 says “teachers of the law” (νομοδιδασκαλοι). The translation “Torah” is one of those “interpretative” renderings which mar most of the modern Bible translations. νομοs is the very ordinary Greek word for “law” in all periods.


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In wide brush strokes, the Christian New Testament depicts two extremes of errant believers. On the one hand, the errant proselytes of Paul tended toward antinomianism, since their background was Gentile and therefore secular; and, conversely, the errant proselytes of Peter (plus James and John) tended toward legalism, since their background was Jewish and ...



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