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15

Who is "she"? To answer your first question, the "she" in verse 15 probably refers back to the she in verse 12 ("she must be silent"). For "she" to refer to Eve would seem like a digression. It's better to think Paul stays on point. What does it mean for her to be "saved through child bearing?" Having read numerous attempts at a reasonable interpretation, ...


7

A Socio-cultural hermeneutical approach is the worst way to interpret scripture, since this approach is usually based on extra-biblical sources, and allows anyone to interpret any scripture any way they want. You can always find some instance of ancient culture that will allow you to interpret scripture in the way that bests suits you, also known as ...


6

Starting off, the author self-identifies as Paul. While there is debate on whether the Paul wrote this letter, that's outside the realm of this discussion. So for shorthand, I will call him 'Paul', regardless of who the author actually was. Literally, the word παραγγελιας refers to a 'command', 'mandate' or 'instruction'. It is an authoritative order being ...


5

Is that because the original texts are indented too or something, so that it looks like a poem? No. The old manuscripts (at least as far as I am aware) do not indent poetry. However, since there are so many, I would advise looking up one of the projects that is digitizing the manuscripts so you can see them for yourself. Edit: you can view a number of ...


5

Because of an edit made in your post, it is important to note that money itself is not being called the root of all evils (nor all sorts of evils) in this passage, it is the love of money that is problematic, as the edit to the question has clarified. With that said, 1 Timothy 6:10 is a difficult text to translate. A literal translation of the text would ...


4

Certainly it changes the passage from being descriptive to being prescriptive. The intent of that section (6:3-10) seems to be to contrast two types of people: 1) those with unsound doctrine who pursue "godliness" as a means to financial gain, and 2) those with sound teaching who pursue contentment for a different kind of gain. If the phrase is kept, it ...


4

As GalacticCowboy's answer suggests, the phrase seems to be related to commissioning elders. Given that Paul was a student of Gamaliel (Acts 22) and the author of Hebrews seems deeply knowledgeable about Jewish sacrificial rites and uses arguments similar to Paul's in Galatians, it seems possible that both are referencing the rabbinic practice of semikhah ...


4

Most commentators circle around the ideas that these are either Jewish genealogies or a unknown Gnostic type of genealogies that include angels. However there seems to be strong support that it was a particularly Jewish disturbance being spoken of in Timothy and Titus, as compared to say Colossians which may have been related to a mystic type of Jewish ...


4

Where the phrase is used Here are several places where the apostle Paul uses this phrase, usually translated by the ESV as "The statement is trustworthy": (1Tim 1:15 [GNT]) πιστὸς ὁ λόγος καὶ πάσης ἀποδοχῆς ἄξιος, ὅτι Χριστὸς Ἰησοῦς ἦλθεν εἰς τὸν κόσμον ἁμαρτωλοὺς σῶσαι· ὧν πρῶτός εἰμι ἐγώ, (1Tim 3:1 [GNT]) Πιστὸς ὁ λόγος· εἴ τις ἐπισκοπῆς ὀρέγεται, καλοῦ ...


4

I can't speak to poetry in the NT, as I am not familiar with the distinctives of Greek poetry. But I would like to expand on @malachi1990's excellent answer by mentioning some of the characteristics that set Hebrew poetry apart from prose. English poetic text can often be identified by two primary linguistic characteristics: rhyme and rythm (or metre). The ...


4

The classical Greek word ἀρρενοκοίτης (or ἀρσενοκοίτης in Koine Greek) means "sodomy" according to its usage in antiquity (please click here, and note its use and translation in paragraph 686, line 5, where the direct reference are to those Arabs who lie with other men for sexual intercourse). So there is no ambiguity of the use of this word in 1 Cor 6:9-10 ...


4

One early lesson in Classical Greek class is that neuter plural nouns in Greek function as a "collective" in the singular, and therefore can take verbs and their forms in the singular. The Greek word in question in 1 Tim 3:4 is τέκνa, which is neuter plural. REFERENCE: Smyth, Herbert Weir (1918). Greek Grammar. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 264.


3

The Greek text of 1 Tim. 2:1 according to the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1550): Παρακαλῶ οὖν πρῶτον πάντων ποιεῖσθαι δεήσεις προσευχάς ἐντεύξεις εὐχαριστίας ὑπὲρ πάντων ἀνθρώπων The Greek words in question are (in the order in which they occur): δεήσεις (lemma: δέησις) προσευχάς (lemma: προσευχή) ἐντεύξεις (lemma: ἔντευξις) εὐχαριστίας (lemma: ...


3

Louw 88.280 88.280 ἀρσενοκοίτης, ου m: a male partner in homosexual intercourse—‘homosexual.’ οὐκ οἴδατε ὅτι … οὔτε μοιχοὶ οὔτε μαλακοὶ οὔτε ἀρσενοκοῖται … βασιλείαν θεοῦ κληρονομήσουσιν ‘don’t you know that … no adulterers or homosexuals … will receive the kingdom of God’ 1 Cor 6:9–10. It is possible that ἀρσενοκοίτης in certain ...


3

The context of the passage of Paul's letter to Timothy continues... Prescribe and teach these things. 1 Tim 4:11 (NASB) Earlier in the same epistle Paul wrote that Christ Jesus gave Himself as a ransom "for all" (1 Tim 2:6). Therefore it is the desire of "God our Savior" that "all men" be saved (1 Tim 2:4 and 2 Pet 3:9). The Apostle John says that ...


3

The Text: 1 Timothy 4:10 εἰς τοῦτο γὰρ κοπιῶμεν καὶ ὀνειδιζόμεθα, ὅτι ἠλπίκαμεν ἐπὶ θεῷ ζῶντι, ὅς ἐστιν σωτὴρ πάντων ἀνθρώπων, μάλιστα πιστῶν. Explanation μάλιστα is a superlative, like “chief” and “most”. Sometimes it may be used to indicate certainty (BDAG Lexicon). In this case, and the two following instances of μάλιστα in 1 Timothy, the ESV ...


3

The Jewish method of prayer was not folding hands as many Westerners do today, but rather to hold up the hands and face towards heaven. Tim Chailles (a Christian blogger notes this is mentioned in severla Psalms - see this link, especially towards the 'Lifting Hands' section.) Additionally, the Jewish Encyclopedia shows a relief of Jews entering the ...


3

In 1 Timothy 5:22, the context (starting from verse 17) appears to be focused upon the appointment of elders (presbuteros). It seems from various passages (Acts 6:6, 13:3; 1 Timothy 4:14) that this act (laying on of hands) symbolized the dedication or commissioning of an individual to a task - in this case, leading the church. 2 Timothy 1:6 apparently ...


3

Calvin and Gill agree that "she" refers to all women. Both take the through to be circumstantial rather than causal; that is, with the sense of passing through rather than by. Having just mentioned how the woman was deceived first, and therefore has the curse of the pain of childbearing upon her, Paul quickly moves to giving comfort that women who persevere ...


3

Heb 10.1 ¶ For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, ... The literal appoach to scripture offers no meaning from the text for 'shadows'. Yet if we do not understand the shadows, we do not really understand the law. When Paul speaks of marriage, though it is clear to all who read his teaching that he ...


3

It says "I do not permit" and does not say "God commands thus..." or "You must not permit", suggesting Paul is speaking in his own conclusive mind; because elsewhere in the letter he does say "must" (1 Timothy 3:2-12). Though these are all translations, and might not mean the same in the native language in which it was written.


2

The immediate context of the remark is in the middle of a series of instructions about everyday troubles: Honor widows who are truly widows. But if a widow has children or grandchildren, let them first learn to show godliness to their own household and to make some return to their parents, for this is pleasing in the sight of God. She who is truly a ...


2

Starting with the basic textual criticism, here's a note from the NET Bible: Although most witnesses, including some early versions and fathers (D2 Ψ Ï sy Cyp Lcf Ambst), have ἀφίστασο ἀπὸ τῶν τοιούτων (afistaso apo’ twn toioutwn, “stay away from such things!”) after εὐσεβείαν (eusebeian, “godliness”; thus, “who suppose that godliness is a way of making ...


2

The source of this additional clause is the following bit of Greek: ἀφιστασο ἀπο των τοιουτων Which means essentially "keep away from them", with the key word being ἀφιστημι. This clause appears in the majority of manuscripts, but not in the best ones. Among the great uncials, it is present only in a ninth-century emendation to Codex Bezae. Codex ...


2

1 Tim 1:4 μηδε προσεχειν μυθοις και γενεαλογιαις απεραντοις αιτινες ζητησεις παρεχουσιν μαλλον η οικοδομιαν θεου την εν πιστει (textus receptus) 1 Tim 1:4 μηδὲ προσέχειν μύθοις καὶ γενεαλογίαις ἀπεράντοις αἵτινες ἐκζητήσεις παρέχουσιν μᾶλλον ἢ οἰκονομίαν θεοῦ τὴν ἐν πίστει (critical text) Because of the one-letter difference between a "d" and an "n", ...


2

As to your first question: Is 2 Tim. 1:6 a parallel to 1 Tim. 4:14? That is, do they refer to the same "gift" and the same "laying on of hands" event? According to the several Bibles and commentaries I've examined, yes. As to your second question: What "spiritual gift" is Paul referring to in 1 Tim. 4:14? Ignatius (Epistle to the Ephesians 13, ...


2

Homosexuality is an invention of the 19th century. Before then, people had words for specific sexual acts (sodomy etc.), but they did not have the concept of any inherent or acquired “sexual orientation”. This concept originated in modern psycho-pathology. To translate ἀρσενοκοίτης as “homosexual”, as some modern Bible translations do, is an anachronism, if ...


2

Bible scholar Ben Witherington argues that the peculiar phrasing of this verse—the singular "she" in the subject combined with the plural "they" after the verb, as well as the form of τῆς τεκνογονίας, literally "the childbearing"—points to a particular birth, namely, the birth of Jesus. Moreover, the context indicates that Paul is addressing a ...


2

The Idea in Brief The New Testament is explicit that women do not hold the "office" of teaching (or pastoring), but they may nonetheless have the "gift" of teaching. In the case of the "office" of deacon, there is no explicit expectation or reference that such people need teach the Word of God (as is otherwise the case with the overseer in the same ...


2

The author(s) of the pastoral letters only provides a few details about his opponents, including: They believe 'myths', 'irreverent, silly myths', and 'Jewish myths' (1 Timothy 1.4; 4.7; Second Timothy 4.4; Titus 1.14) They speculate and have vain discussions (1 Timothy 1.4,6) They desire to be teachers of the law/Torah (1 Timothy 1.7) They forbid marriage ...



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