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8

You are correct in that the latter clause does not name either Yahveh or Samuel. Hebrew text: וַיִּגְדַּל שְׁמוּאֵל וַיהוָה הָיָה עִמּוֹ וְלֹא הִפִּיל מִכָּל דְּבָרָיו אָרְצָה English translation: And Samuel grew up, and Yahveh was with him, and he did not let any of his words fall to the ground. Or, And Samuel grew up, and Yahveh was with ...


7

The only Biblical answer I can find is that the men were at least 20 to be in the army. So David would have been less then twenty if he was considered too young to fight. Num 1:3 from twenty years old and upward, whoever is able to go out to war in Israel, you and Aaron shall number them by their armies. The following is only conjecture and can not ...


7

I think when you understand how Jewish custom works you will understand there has been some misunderstanding as to exsactly what weaning meant back then. Not the way we understand it today. In Jewish custom there are two meanings for weaning. The first meaning is the time a baby finishes drinking his mother’s breast milk. Today, that meaning is the most ...


6

Is dead Samuel's appearance to Saul 'real'? According to the plain declaration of Scripture the medium did, in fact, see Samuel (1 Samuel 28:12). Furthermore, in the same verse we see that, after a fashion, the medium herself attests to the genuineness of Samuel's appearance by crying out with a loud voice. Apparently this was something she had not ...


6

This information is in further support of an answer close to Joshua Wilson's (which was not really much other information that the original link you posted), though leaning toward the older end of his range and perhaps even slightly older (15-18 years old). Reading commentaries and looking at various translations informs one that Saul's age and length of ...


4

The Masoretic text of the phrase translated "young as he was" (NIV) and "the child was very young" (VDC) translates literally as "and the boy [was] a boy." This phrase is והנער נער. Both translations are in agreement that it indicates the youngness of Samuel. However, other translations assume a textual problem here. They conclude that the repetition of ...


3

Samuel lived around 1100-900 BC. Esther lived around 475 BC (Assuming Xerxes I is the king referred to in that account). I wouldn't trust Wikipedia to offer an analysis proceeding from the assumption that the Bible is true and reliable. I can't speak about modern Jewish tradition, but Deuteronomy 25:17-19 is about the Amalekites attacking Israel after they ...


2

The Hebrew word for prophet is nabi. A nabi was a recipient of God's revelation of Himself and His word. As Graeme Bradford points out, Samuel, for example was a " nabi . . . to whom God revealed Himself and [who] received messages directly from God (1 Samuel 3:7, 21). In the case of Samuel [these messages comprised] information that had contemporary ...


2

While Joseph's answer has much to commend it, I feel it is headed in the wrong direction. I don't think there is a need to suppose two sets of Abiathars and Ahimelechs where one is father-son and the other vice versa. First, 1 Kings 2:26-27 is clear that it was indeed the so-called "good" Abiathar it's talking about since verse 27 notes that his life was ...


2

I believe that the text indicates that David wrote it in a reflectory fashion. In the annotation, the noun "טַ֭עְמוֹ" "his behavior" is the key to this. This noun is also used in 1 Samuel 21:14. The interesting thing about this noun is that it can also mean "taste", e.g. "אִם־יֶשׁ־טַ֝֗עַם בְּרִ֣יר חַלָּמֽוּת׃" "or is there any taste in the white of an ...


2

If we want to understand the text, we have to read the text as it was written in the context of what it says, and not superimpose our own later theological concepts upon it. In Hebrew, there is no "heaven", there is only ha'shamayim, which is "the skies" (it is a dual plural). Nor is there any "Hell". "Hell" is a word from Norse cosmology that means the ...


1

The Idea in Brief The Hebrew Bible indicates in several places that there is conscious existence after death. For example, when the Biblical text indicates that "tomorrow you [King Saul] and your sons shall be with me," there is implied existence after death in this passage. That is, Samuel stated that Saul "had disturbed" him (1 Sam 28:15) and thus Samuel ...


1

Here is the case where the Bible is its own best commentary and our own definition causes issues. To us neighbor means the person living next to us, but in reality neighbor is a close associate or friend. In regards to the Samaratin in Luke 10 who helps the Jew as opposed to the two people who turned their backs on him, Jesus ask the Jewish leaders who was ...


1

According to Jewish tradition, the Sages of the Great Assembly -- the minor prophets and other leaders, including Ezra and Daniel, who left Babylon to rebuild the Temple 70 years after the destruction of the 1st Temple -- condensed Mordechai's original letter to the Jewish people into the book we now know as the Book of Esther. See Babyl. Talmud Bava Basra ...


1

Jesus faced the same insult. John 8:48 (NASB) 48 The Jews answered and said to Him, “Do we not say rightly that You are a Samaritan and have a demon?” The charge was illegitimacy. Saul was telling Jonathan that his mother played the harlot (perverse rebellious woman who uncovered her nakedness) and the result was Jonathan, who was an illegitimate ...


1

Saul understood that David was being preferred by Israel over himself. He was concerned that he would lose his kingdom to David, which meant that Jonathan, his son, would also lose the kingdom. Jonathan did not care about any of this, since he loved David as deeply as a brother. As a result, Saul became angry with Jonathan. He thought Jonathan should have ...



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