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8

The phrase "seven children" in the poem is almost certainly poetic and not intended to indicate that Hannah actually bore seven children. The number seven was a number of completion in the ancient Near East. It is readily seen elsewhere: Ruth 4:15 — He will renew your life and sustain you in your old age. For your daughter-in-law, who loves you and ...


7

The World Health Organization reports that the average weaning age is 4.2 years worldwide at present, however the weaning age has declined in modern times and the weaning age would have been higher in the past. This is supported by the book of II Maccabees, 7:27 wherein a mother casually mentions giving milk to her son for three years which would be ...


5

Does 1 Samuel 15 disprove the "Ancient Near East Warfare Rhetoric" theory? In short, no. Nothing about 1 Samuel 15 disproves the Ancient Near East Warfare Rhetoric. The concept within such rhetoric is that the language is exaggeration; that God did not actually require literally every single thing which breathed to be hunted down and killed. The article ...


5

Eli's Failure Somewhat regardless of whether the word כָּהָה (kāhâ) should mean "rebuke" or "restrain," at the point which the sons refused to obey their father Eli (1 Sam 2:25), Eli should have had his sons killed on the basis of two, and possibly three points of the Law (quotes from NASB): Dishonoring God's Law—Lev 3 and Lev 4 with Num 15:30-311 ...


5

Interacting with Frank Luke's response, I like the theory proposed by E.W. Bullinger, however it does not seem to fit with what immediately follows in Chapter 18. First of all I believe that Bullinger is correct in his analysis of the construction of the passage. I agree that the intent is to contrast the Spirit coming upon David and leaving Saul, and ...


4

The Idea in Brief Eli had done nothing to "tone down" his sons, or to mitigate their behavior. So while on the one hand he had rebuked them in Chapter 2, there is nothing in the text to suggest that he had done anything from that time onward to mitigate their behavior, which is the observation in Chapter 3. Later in the book, Samuel himself comes to have ...


3

The commentators all note the significant place that the root š.ʾ.l has in the opening chapter of Samuel. Because of the punch-line ("he is lent (šāʾûl) to the LORD") in v. 28, many also are minded to think that it belongs, rather, to a now missing birth narrative of Saul. This remains contentious. It is also the case that the forms that bother OP have ...


3

Brown-Driver-Brigg's definition of rêa‛ (רֵיעַ): friend, companion, fellow, another person friend, intimate fellow, fellow-citizen, another person (weaker sense) other, another (reciprocal phrase) "Neighbor" is probably the best word to use in this particular case, because at this point Saul and David aren't really "friends" or "companions." "Fellow" ...


2

HALOT cites the following for this word (emphasis mine): —General note: the sbst. רֵעַ includes a wide range of related meanings which are more closely defined by their respective contexts. With Noth ATD 5:133 the general sense may be summarised thus: רֵעַ, without expressing a particular legal relationship, means those persons with whom one is brought ...


2

Does 1 Samuel 15 disprove the "Ancient Near East Warfare Rhetoric" theory? In short, yes, though not so much ‘disprove’ as reveal the theory’s misapplication by the author. The theory is, firstly, about rhetoric, about how warfare is memorialized and talked about after the fact. Recognizing that much ANE war literature is exaggerated, some exegetes ...


2

If you further read the text in 1 Samuel 2:5, AFTER Hannah leaves Samuel with Eli and when she is praising the Lord she says, "She who was barren has borne seven children, but she who has many sons pines away." Hannah is referring to herself in the first part of that sentence, so by the time she committed Samuel to the Lord as a servant of the priest (which ...


1

The word has other connotations, like ‘friend’ (42 times in KJV) or ‘fellow’ (10 times), but ‘neighbor’ is most common (102 times) and is not incorrect. Saul was apparently from Gibeah of Benjamin, and David was from Bethlehem of Judah, about 10 miles south. Though part of a loosely ‘united kingdom’, the tribal designations remained critically important, ...


1

I think that the key here might be that the root word נחם is being used in two different ways. While the word can mean to regret (see e.g. Exodus 13:17 פֶּֽן־יִנָּחֵ֥ם הָעָ֛ם בִּרְאֹתָ֥ם מִלְחָמָ֖ה) it can also mean to console or to appease (see e.g. Genesis 24:67 וַיִּנָּחֵ֥ם יִצְחָ֖ק אַחֲרֵ֥י אִמּֽוֹ and Isaiah 40:1 נַחֲמ֥וּ נַחֲמ֖וּ עַמִּ֑י). This is ...


1

In short, I believe the meaning of "person next door" can be set aside for this question. Instead here is a Bible study tool regarding the term. Halfway down the page it defines “Neighbor” [na'-ber (rea`)] in two ways, those being: As Described in the Old Testament: Within this fairly long definition is “the term implies more than mere proximity; it ...


1

The second chapter of the book of Esther introduces one of the main characters - Mordecai - and explains who he is and his history among the nobility of Persia. At the outset of the description of who he is, the Bible tells us that he is a Benjamite, and conveniently slips in the detail that he is from the line of Kish. The very next chapter, chapter 3, ...


1

Whether Haman was a descendant of King Agag whom Saul was suppose to kill or not we really don't know but in 1 Chronicles 4:43 (around 300 yrs after Samuel had killed Agag) it says that 'they defeated the rest of the Amelekites who had escaped'. So it could have been possible that Haman was a descendant of King Agag but no real way to prove it.



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