Hot answers tagged

12

A detailed study on this issue by Daniel B. Wallace of the Evangelical Theological Society discusses five possibilities: Text-Critical: The text as it stands is incorrect and needs to be emended. Dominical: Jesus himself made a mistake or was intentionally midrashic (i.e., he embellished the OT story to make his point). Source-critical: Mark’s source ...


11

Depends on what "canonical" is. The sources are: QSam 4 (Qumeran text) Septuagint Masoretic QSam 4 and the Septuagint read "four cubits" in Hebrew and Greek respectively. The Masoretic Hebrew texts on which the King James and later translations are based all have "six cubits". Most people do not consider either QSam 4 or the Septuagint as "canonical". ...


11

The only Biblical answer I can find is that the men were at least 20 to be in the army. So David would have been less then twenty if he was considered too young to fight. Num 1:3 from twenty years old and upward, whoever is able to go out to war in Israel, you and Aaron shall number them by their armies. The following is only conjecture and can not ...


11

You are correct in that the latter clause does not name either Yahveh or Samuel. Hebrew text: וַיִּגְדַּל שְׁמוּאֵל וַיהוָה הָיָה עִמּוֹ וְלֹא הִפִּיל מִכָּל דְּבָרָיו אָרְצָה English translation: And Samuel grew up, and Yahveh was with him, and he did not let any of his words fall to the ground. Or, And Samuel grew up, and Yahveh was with ...


10

According to a NET Bible note: Heb “his height was six cubits and a span” (cf. KJV, NASB, NRSV). A cubit was approximately eighteen inches, a span nine inches. So, according to the Hebrew tradition, Goliath was about nine feet, nine inches tall (cf. NIV, CEV, NLT “over nine feet”; NCV “nine feet, four inches”; TEV “nearly 3 metres”). However, some Greek ...


10

It is important to remember that the "historical books" of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings are better called "the earlier prophets." They teach from the prophetic point of view, not simply chronological events. From Hard Sayings of the Bible. It is more important to group things by importance than it is to lay it out chronologically. 17:55–58 Why ...


10

This information is in further support of an answer close to Joshua Wilson's (which was not really much other information that the original link you posted), though leaning toward the older end of his range and perhaps even slightly older (15-18 years old). Reading commentaries and looking at various translations informs one that Saul's age and length of ...


9

I Sam 31 is written in the voice of the anonymous narrator. This narrator writes with the authority of prophecy and so his version of events is the version that we should accept as correct - Saul fell on his own sword as did his armorer. The story told by the Amaleki kid in 2 Sam 1:8 is obviously a lie - the kid claims to David that he identified himself to ...


9

David, in convincing Saul why he should be allowed to be Israel's representative on the battlefield says, "Your servant has struck down both lions and bears, and this uncircumcised Philistine shall be like one of them, for he has defied the armies of the living God." And to Goliath he says, You come to me with a sword and with a spear and with a ...


9

The phrase "seven children" in the poem is almost certainly poetic and not intended to indicate that Hannah actually bore seven children. The number seven was a number of completion in the ancient Near East. It is readily seen elsewhere: Ruth 4:15 — He will renew your life and sustain you in your old age. For your daughter-in-law, who loves you and ...


8

Idols were commonplace in David's time, perhaps his wife Michal went out and purchased one to help cover up his escape. Another possibility is that other residents in his household worshiped the idols and David never expressly forbade idols from his household, thus Michal may have borrowed or moved an idol from elsewhere in the house.


8

Note that the people wondering at Saul’s prophecy called him “the son of Kish”; i.e., they were wondering, “how can it be that the son of such an ordinary man is suddenly ‘among the prophets’?” The answer to their question is simple: Look at the other prophets; did they inherit this position from their fathers? Some, perhaps—but where did their fathers get ...


7

There are two plausible scenarios: It happened as the Amalekite said. The Amalekite embellished the story thinking he would be rewarded for helping David become king. In scenario 1, though Saul's armourbearer presumed Saul was dead, Saul was 'still kickin' and revived when the Amalekite came by. In scenario 2 the Amalekite came upon the scene and ...


7

David attacks the Geshurites, the Gezerites and the Amelikites, all traditional enemies of Judah and Israel and potential allies of Achish to the southwest. He left no one alive so that no prisoners would tell Achish who David was really attacking, that's the trick. When asked, David says that he attacked to the south (actually southwest) of Judah, south of ...


7

The World Health Organization reports that the average weaning age is 4.2 years worldwide at present, however the weaning age has declined in modern times and the weaning age would have been higher in the past. This is supported by the book of II Maccabees, 7:27 wherein a mother casually mentions giving milk to her son for three years which would be ...


6

It's important to realize that Saul is unambiguously violating a biblical prohibition in seeking out Samuel: There shall not be found among you any one who maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or who useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch, or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, ...


6

Is there a canonical reference to Goliath's height? As others have said, there cannot be a canonical reference to Goliath's height because measures were not standardized and there is no conclusive evidence to calibrate the measurements given beyond giving us a rough range. As a matter of speculation, however, I favour understanding Goliath to be ...


6

Here is a list of possible answers: The author has to integrate a lot of oral tradition from opposing sides in what was in fact a civil war; northern anti-monarchy tribal federalists backed by some heavy hitting prophets, pro-monarchy Kish clan proponents, and pro-monarchy Ishai clan proponents. No one comes out of I Samuel smelling like roses. The author ...


6

"Jonathan, you are shaming your own mother (i.e. violating commandment 5 of the decalogue), not that I think that she is anything but a perverse and rebellious woman (who would produce a child like you)." That is, when stating "to the shame of your mother's nakedness" Saul is speaking to Jonathan in Jonathan's frame of reference of a child to his mother, ...


6

Is dead Samuel's appearance to Saul 'real'? According to the plain declaration of Scripture the medium did, in fact, see Samuel (1 Samuel 28:12). Furthermore, in the same verse we see that, after a fashion, the medium herself attests to the genuineness of Samuel's appearance by crying out with a loud voice. Apparently this was something she had not ...


5

I Sam 12:11 in 4QSam Frg.d has only the word "Jerubal", the rest of the verse is missing. Leningrad and Allepo have "...Jerubbaal and Bedan and Jephthah and Samuel...", same in Brenton's English LXX. RASHI says Bedan is Samson as he was "in [the tribe of] Dan" ("b'Dan") or "of the tribe of Dan" ("ben Dan"). The targum has "...Gideon and Samson and Jephtah ...


5

Interacting with Frank Luke's response, I like the theory proposed by E.W. Bullinger, however it does not seem to fit with what immediately follows in Chapter 18. First of all I believe that Bullinger is correct in his analysis of the construction of the passage. I agree that the intent is to contrast the Spirit coming upon David and leaving Saul, and ...


5

Firstly, I believe in the inerrancy of God's Word, but I don't believe it is always helpful to bend over backwards making things 'fit' - sometimes we have to just accept that we don't have the knowledge to do so (and in those cases I'd say the things that have been revealed are the things that matter - and also go along with jrdioko's quote against the ...


5

I think this question must be broken down in two: Why did Jonathan and David make up this plan? Why did the author of the book include this detail in the narrative? The first question has never really bothered me, thus this answer is not the result of extensive study, nor have I consulted any commentaries. I have always envisioned that they made the plan ...


5

Robert Alter deals with this question in his translation and commentary of the Book of Psalms: "...when he altered his good sense before Abimelech." The superscription refers directly to 1 Samuel 21:14, where David, surrounded before the city of Gath by the Philistine king and his men, saves himself by playing the madman. The same unusual idiom ...


5

Does 1 Samuel 15 disprove the "Ancient Near East Warfare Rhetoric" theory? In short, no. Nothing about 1 Samuel 15 disproves the Ancient Near East Warfare Rhetoric. The concept within such rhetoric is that the language is exaggeration; that God did not actually require literally every single thing which breathed to be hunted down and killed. The article ...


5

Eli's Failure Somewhat regardless of whether the word כָּהָה (kāhâ) should mean "rebuke" or "restrain," at the point which the sons refused to obey their father Eli (1 Sam 2:25), Eli should have had his sons killed on the basis of two, and possibly three points of the Law (quotes from NASB): Dishonoring God's Law—Lev 3 and Lev 4 with Num 15:30-311 ...


4

The layers of abstraction increase as you move through the sources. Masoretic Text/Dead Sea Scrolls are generally perceived as closest to the source The LXX, as a Greek translation of the HOT is the first layer of abstraction since it is a translation. However, when dealing with the NT usage of the OT, the LXX is preferred since that is the "Scripture" ...


4

The word "Abiathar" in the text may go all the way back to Jesus and it's entirely possible he misspoke. As Bruce Alderman's answer ably points out, we can never know the exact words that Jesus spoke as there were no recording devices at the time. Therefore, we must rely on the people who heard Jesus' words to remember them until they could be recorded ...


4

Other answerers have attempted to made the case that this is not an error. I’m not entirely convinced by their arguments, but perhaps this question can be expressed more neutrally as, “Who introduced the priest’s name in Mark 2:26?” The most likely candidate, I believe, is Mark himself. Although at this late stage we cannot know for certain what exactly ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible