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Clearly, in the context of early Christianity, the meaning of a royal priesthood could neither have been a priesthood that serves royalty, nor a priesthood of kings. Any intended meaning for the phrase is likely to come from what is known as Source Criticism. 1 Peter 2:9 is an allusion to Exodus 19:6: 1 Peter 2:9: But ye are a chosen generation, a royal ...


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As stated, it would be highly unusual for two writers (Peter and Paul) to invent the same rhetorical form out of whole cloth, but there is a simpler explanation for the use of the same rhetorical form in Colossians 3:18-4:1, Ephesians 5:21-6:9, and 1 Peter 2:18-3:7. Thomas Calnan Sorenson (Liberating the Bible: A Pastor’s Guided Tour for Seeking Christians,...


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Raymond E. Brown says, in An Introduction to the New Testament, page 453, First Peter is in many theological stances close to Pauline thought. He says that some critics would put that writing in the Pauline rather than the Petrine school. In other words, the author knew a good deal about Paul's epistles, whether from having seen them or otherwise. The extent ...



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