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1 Kings 17:23 = Lk 7:15 καὶ ἔδωκεν αὐτὸν τῇ μητρὶ αὐτοῦ The wording in Lk 7:15 agrees word for word with 1 Kings 17:23 (LXX). I think it is very likely that the author of Luke had the LXX version of the Elijah story in front of him (or at least in his memory) and took it as a literary model. Compare also: 1 Kings 17:10 εἰς τὸν πυλῶνα τῆς πόλεως, καὶ ...


5

You're not alone in having noticed this repetition. Various hypotheses have been proposed for its existence, from those suggesting it is a thematic choice by the narrator to highlight Elijah's change in character, to a more critical position that there was an intentional addition (perhaps from an alternate tradition of the same story). While in the process ...


3

The Idea in Brief The term "וְכָל־הָאָרֶץ" appears to refer not only to the general area of Palestine and/or the Fertile Crescent, but beyond to the known world at the time. Discussion The Masoretic Text provides valuable clues. First, the photographic facsimiles of the Aleppo Codex and the Leningrad Codex indicate that the phrase "וְכָל־הָאָרֶץ" occurs ...


3

The change is even more gradual than that. The narrative is intended to show Solomon very slowly becoming corrupted due to his power and wealth. For example: at the end of 1 Kings 6 it says he took 7 years to build God's temple (Heb: 'Beth'), and in the next verse (1 Kings 7:1) it says he took 14 years to beuild his own house (Heb: 'Beth'). So he already ...


2

The answer is provided by Lester L. Grabbe,Professor of the Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism at the University of Hull, in his book, Ancient Israel. He says (page 114) he finds it difficult to discover much in the Solomon story that strikes him as likely to be historical, although he does not discount the existence of a king Solomon. On page 121, he says ...


2

If we imagine that the people did most of the killing and that the priest's only sprinkled from each on to the altar then a sacrifice every four seconds is quite possible. The large number indicates how many people were involved and how energetic they were in accomplishing the task. According to Josephus a Passover-feast at Jerusalem in Nero’s time, the ...


2

Oxen were very expensive in biblical times. Few farmers owned even a single team of them. In ancient documents from elsewhere in the Near East, there are records of farmers renting them from wealthy owners or even government officials. My assumption that that Elisha owns both the oxen and the land is that he's in charge of the whole team of and yet he's ...


2

The Idea in Brief The Latin Vulgate appears to qualify and amplify the ambiguous meaning of the Masoretic Text. That is, Elijah gives his blessing for Elisha to return home to bid his family and friends good-bye because of the anointing by Elijah. Thus the Latin Vulgate adds "and return" (i.e., to me, Elijah). The basis for the Latin Vulgate reading may ...


1

Combining Matthew Henry's insight here, Constable's insight here, and perhaps a soupçon of my own insight, I suggest we are safe in saying the following: Elijah's idiomatic expression, and possibly a common Hebraism in Elijah's day, "Go back again, for what have I done to you?" could be paraphrased as follows: "Go ahead. You're free to do as you like." ...


1

I think it is helpful here to look at how the phrase "high places" is used. The Hebrew word is "bamah". This look will be chronological. 1) Samuel sacrifices at the high places, and many of his contemporary prophets are associated with these high places (1Sam 9, 10:5, 10:13). This is not contrary to Israelite religion, as Jerusalem had not yet been ...



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