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The text does not give a direct answer to this question. That is not to say we must be left wondering! There are two common reasons why a text may omit details that would seem relevant to us. They are simply not relevant to what the author was trying to communicate.1 It is assumed that the immediate audience would have understood the scenario given their ...


3

The customary/traditional Hebrew reading is "he saw". The Radak (a medieval biblical commentator) states that some people read "and he was afraid" and that there's no literary necessity to do so, he "saw" that he was in trouble, and he fled. The Jonathan Aramaic translation (which is from around the 7th century) also renders "he saw". The emphasis of the ...


3

As Mawia notes, this cannot be an immediate decommissioning because Elijah continues to act as a prophet as he carries out God's instructions in this chapter. The mantle of prophecy passed from Elijah to Elisha; it wasn't revoked and later given fresh, or it wouldn't make sense for God to tell Elijah to annoint Elisha as successor. (I note in passing that ...


2

Traditional theology holds that the book of Deuteronomy was either given at Sinai or written by Moshe (modulo the last eight verses), so in that framework, knowledge of the Deuteronomy text ought to be sounding alarm bells when reading Kings. However, scholars generally ascribe later authorship to Deuteronomy, which complicates things. Conventional ...


2

The reference is to the daily sacrifice offered in the afternoon. Numbers 28 (4). Most non-Jewish translations use the word “twilight” for the Hebrew term The Mishnah about Passover (called Pesachim Chap 5) deals with the time of the OP’s “evening sacrifice”. “The daily burnt-offering' was slaughtered at the eighth hour and a half (note: After ...


2

The manuscript evidence is summed up well by R.B. Allen: The reading “and he was afraid” has the support of LXX, Vg, Syro-Hexapla, Syriac, one MS of the Targum, and some Hebrew MSS. Against this largely versional evidence stand most Hebrew MSS and the Targum, which read “and he saw.” Allen, R.B., "Elijah the Broken Prophet." Journal of the ...


2

The evidence, and the consensus of critical scholars, is that the Deuteronomic History (Joshua, Judges, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings and 2 Kings), written before the Babylonian Exile, was the main source for the Book of Chronicles (now 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles), but that the author of Chronicles probably had other material available as well. Chronicles ...


1

The 666 number in 1 Kings 10:14 appears to be simply coincidence. The text in Revelation where 666 also appears says, "And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name. Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number ...


1

Ezr 9:4 Then were assembled unto me every one that trembled at the words of the God of Israel, because of the transgression of those that had been carried away; and I sat astonied until the evening sacrifice. Psa 141:2 Let my prayer be set forth before thee as incense; and the lifting up of my hands as the evening sacrifice. Here's what we know ...


1

There is no way possible that the 36th year was during the reign of Asa, since Baasha only reigned 24 yrs (1 Ki 15:33), and that reign had only begun when Asa was already sitting as king in Judah for about 4-5 years. In other words, "in the 36th year" refers to the time when the person was king since the kingdom divided, which is the preference of the ...


1

It did not sound like decommissioning because Elijah still had the power of God. God was still using him and he could still perform miracles. 2 Kings 2:8 Elijah took his cloak, rolled it up and struck the water with it. The water divided to the right and to the left, and the two of them crossed over on dry ground. God wanted to appoint a successor ...


1

All of the comments relating to Elijah running away from Jezebel ignores one thing. Ahab was still king and Jezebel was his wife. Just like David would not touch Saul because he was still God's anointed as King. I believe Elijah would not touch Jezebel because of her being the wife of the king. Elijah did not loose his commission because of this. As pointed ...



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