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6

Frankly, I also searched for but couldn’t find much of others addressing the parallels of Ruth and Elisha. Walfish was almost always the writer. What I did find were mostly studies of one book that had cross references to the other(s) (e.g. Ruth noting a Kings book or vice versa). For some other material I found, see the comment at the bottom of this ...


4

1 Kings 7:1-7 seems to come down in favor of (2), and v.8 to argue against (3). The reference to shields bears out the IVP Bible Background Commentary - O T's comment that, "Like other palace complexes in the ANE (such as those at Mari, Babylon and Susa), Solomon's ...palace itself was larger than the temple. It served as an administrative complex as well as ...


3

The original question contained a link to the interesting article by Rendsburg 1988: http://jewishstudies.rutgers.edu/docman/rendsburg/64-the-mock-of-baal-in-1-kings-18-27/file Has anyone else looked at it? The author argues that śiăḥ and śiḡ are a hendiadys. śiḡ or siḡ is well-known in the meaning “go away, step aside”, and can thus reasonably be ...


3

The change is even more gradual than that. The narrative is intended to show Solomon very slowly becoming corrupted due to his power and wealth. For example: at the end of 1 Kings 6 it says he took 7 years to build God's temple (Heb: 'Beth'), and in the next verse (1 Kings 7:1) it says he took 14 years to beuild his own house (Heb: 'Beth'). So he already ...


2

In doing some research on this subject, this is what I found. According to the ISBE She [Abhishag], had an intimate knowledge of the condition of David, and was present at the interview of Bathsheba with David which resulted in the placing of Solomon on the throne. If that act had been questioned she would have been a most important witness. By reason of ...


2

Cases for a 'kingly' identification There are 24 kings linked using a single phrase, and 24 'elders'. Therefore there may be a correlation between the two. They elders have 'crowns' and are sat on 'thrones', which may suggest a royal disposition. Cases against a 'kingly' identification The author expressly describes the men as elders and not kings, and ...


1

As @seedy3 already concluded, Abishag was a wife of King David, though he never had intercourse with her (1 King 1:1-4). But it would not have been adultery to marry the wife of King David in this case. David was already dead. It's even possible Salomon later took Abishag as his wife as the King's wifes were part of the crown posession. Lev 20:11 talks ...


1

The Hebrew is ערך and whilst it has a wide semantic domain the basic idea behind the term is arrangement or setting up1, the term does not, therefore, necessitate that wood for the burning of the sacrifice had to set up in a special way, but simply that it needed to be set up. The NET captures this meaning well; 1 Kings 18:33 He arranged the wood, cut up ...



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