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I like this question, and the first application that came to mind is how this could apply to RCatholic doctrine. Since Jesus is God, and this verse does say we shall see Him, as He is,...this would apply to the RC beatific vision, seeing God Face to Face. (In RC doctrine this means the believer is 'in heaven', and therefore is not in purgatory, so they 'made ...


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The Idea in Brief If the conscience condemns itself of past sins, the Spirit of God is greater. That is, despite self-condemnation, the Spirit of God is greater in power and might, and therefore provides full reassurance to the human conscience of complete forgiveness of sins. Discussion In this verse, there are variant readings in four places: [Καὶ] ...


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This is a very good example of the difference between translation and paraphrase. καρδία is an absolutely ordinary Greek word, part of the core vocabulary of Classical, Koine and Modern Greek. It means “heart”. Of course, in this passage it is used figuratively, but in English too “heart” is used figuratively on a daily basis. Sometimes I have the impression ...


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Analyzing the Greek οὐ (G3756) not Adv δύναται (G1410) he is able V-PIM/P-3S ἁμαρτάνειν (G264)to continue sinning, V-PNA Some Translation Options he is not able to continue sinning he cannot continue sinning he cannot sin But there is a spirit in man, And the breath of the Almighty gives him understanding. (Job 32:8 NKJV) An Introduction ...


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The Idea in Brief The present active indicative of the main verb points toward habitual sinning with specific emphasis on those unloving behaviors toward ones fellow believers and leaders. In other words, loving behaviors toward fellow believers and leaders are the actual "practice" of those born from God, not vice-versa. Discussion The verse in question ...


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Bibliographic Postscript This is offered as a supplement to Soldarnal's fine answer. Probably the most thorough (one is tempted to say "exhaustive") account of the internal evidence bearing on the question of the common authorship of gJohn and 1 John is found in A.E. Brooke, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Johannine Epistles (Edinburgh, 1912), ...


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While before the 20th century there was common agreement on common authorship between the Gospel and Epistles of John, there is, as you mention, no such agreement today. At the same time, we are quick to note, however, that John and 1 John share a vocabulary of words and thought forms to such an extent that no one has mounted a serious proposal that they are ...


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John appears to correlate what he has seen / heard (and what his readers had seen / heard) to what he was doing (and to what they were doing). For example, in 1 Jn 1:1-3, the Apostle John relates to his readers what he has seen / heard and now proclaims to his readers concerning "the Word of Life" manifest in the flesh. The idea here is that what is heard / ...


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Excellent question, Susan. There are different perspectives on this. Some take it that John's own thinking about the epistle changed at this point in his writing, and he began to think of it as a work that would be completed (e.g. Longacre). Others take it that the first set of statements is in regard to what he is presently writing, while the second set is ...



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