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Without diving into speculations about Johannine factions, I think we can resolve the matter satisfactorily from within the text itself. There is a tension between 1 John's call to purity and holiness and its admission of the universality and continuation of sin in the life of the believer. Since both of these are present, I take 1 John's purity passages to ...


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The answer lies in the final verse you quoted. Nevertheless, when we are judged in this way by the Lord, we are being disciplined so that we will not be finally condemned with the world. 1 Corinthians 11: 28-32 This indicates that the purpose of this "judgement" is to save the person. Punishment of this sort is a type of correction/discipline meant ...


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The First Epistle of John is a particularly interesting subject for hermeneutics. Burton L. Mack says, in Who Wrote the New Testament, page 215, that a split appears to have taken place in the Johannine community shortly after the turn of the second century. One faction thought it best to merge with other Christian groups of a more centrist leaning. ...


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`The author of 1 John is not identified within the text and does not claim to be an apostle but suggests that he knew Jesus personally: 1Jn 1:1 That which was from the beginning [of Jesus' ministry], which we have heard [first hand], which we have seen [directly] with our eyes, which we looked upon [directly] and have [physically] touched with our ...



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