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Only when complete context, and perspective of the Law get combined, can understanding of the reason for the comment about Idolatry Become understood. The Expression of Love vs. the Selfishness Will a man rob God? Yet you are robbing Me! But you say, ‘How have we robbed You?’ In tithes and offerings. 9 You are cursed with a curse, for you are robbing Me,...


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According to BDAG there are two main usages of the word εἴδωλον. The first has to do with "figures" and the second with false conceptions. It is this second usage that is suggested by the context (as BDAG suggests): εἴδωλον , ου, τό (Hom. et al. ordinarily in the sense: form, image, shadow, phantom; cp. Ath. 27, 1; Hippol., Ref. 4, 50, 2; AcJ 28 [Aa ...


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What was John's meaning? Did he mean, "Be careful not to end up in the local pagan temple" or does he intend to convey another type of idolatry (perhaps a spiritual idolatry of the heart)? Or does He mean both? In terms of contemporary application, both would apply. Keep yourself free from idols and idolatry. In terms of what is written, the writer ...


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The primary element to understand a letter is the audience a writer addresses. After an introduction in Chapter 1 in which the writer includes themselves and a general “you” (1:5), the main body of the letter starts in Chapter 2. Here the writer weaves a series of specific messages to specific groups within general instruction to all readers: My ...


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"Brother" has to mean Christian in this case, because the "brother" who sins "NOT unto death" is given life if the sin is prayed for. This would not be said of an unbeliever, unless John teaches that unbelievers are given eternal life if we pray for them when we see them sin. People usually fail to note that even the sin NOT unto death results in death till ...


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No one who is born of God practices (ποιεῖ) sin … (3:9)1 9 Πᾶς ὁ γεγεννημένος ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ ἁμαρτίαν οὐ ποιεῖ, ὅτι σπέρμα αὐτοῦ ἐν αὐτῷ μένει, καὶ οὐ δύναται ἁμαρτάνειν, ὅτι ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ γεγέννηται. (NA28) ποιεῖ is translated "practice." That is a meaning which leads to the understanding as Joseph shows: the person born of God does not engage in the ...


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While τεκνία has the sense of "kids"...: τεκνίον, ου, τό (Epict. 3, 22, 78; Anth. Pal.; PFlor 365, 15 [III A.D.]; POxy 1766, 14; TestJob, ApcMos) dim. of τέκνον; (little) child voc. pl. τεκνία; in our lit. only in the voc. pl., used by Jesus in familiar, loving address to his disciples, or by a Christian apostle or teacher to his spiritual ...


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No you're not over thinking this. God is love and He is not hate. The "omnipotent, omnipresent, and omniscient nature" is never given to God in the Scriptures. These are terms man made up and then try to reconcile with Scripture based on false premises. The fact that God is love does not contradict with God's word, which says: "I form the light, and ...


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According to Wikipedia, early Church tradition dates the Book of Revelation to end of the the reign of emperor Domitian (81–96), or some time in the early to middle 90s, and most modern scholars agree. This means that the author of the Johannine epistles could have known the Book of Revelation, as long as he was writing during the early years of the second ...


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I agree with The NonTheologian it may be reading too much into the text to infer that the author is writing to two distinct groups (τεκνία and παιδία) because Greek, like English, has synonyms. It would be strange if, in 2:12 he is addressing one group of "little children" and then addressing an entirely different group in the very next verse. The 'elder', ...


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First John is a polemic, whether - as stated in the Orthodox Study Bible introduction for 1 John - against two distinct groups, gnostics and former members, or against former members who are now members of the gnostic grouping. Burton L. Mack, in Who Wrote the New Testament, pages 215-218, believes that a split took place in the Johannine community shortly ...


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Malcolm Coombes ('A Different Approach To The Structure Of 1 John') points to the author's use of structure and other rhetorical amplification techniques, including expolitio, conduplicatio, apanaphora, polysyndeton/asyndeton, antithesis and synonomy. He says 1 John consists of small subunits delineated by repetitions of words and rhetorical structures, ...


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As the author does not refer to himself as 'John' but as the presbyter, or 'elder' (2 John 1:1; 3 John 1:1), I will use that term to refer to him. The attribution to John only came later in the second century. I will look at the epistle as a whole and establish the context before returning to how and why the elder speaks of being born of God. The elder's ...


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The point is that one cannot be simultaneously justified and sinning: 1Jn_1:6 If we say that we have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we lie, and do not the truth: The author is calling Luther's paradigm of simul iustus et peccator a lie and those who embrace his teaching as "out of step" with "the truth": In describing the new birth ...


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The Apostle John refers to the behaviour of someone who has been born of God that results from that new birth, that is a consequence of that new birth, i.e. the behaviour consequent to the "new creation" (2 Cor 5:17 & Gal 6:15). To the extent that someone who has been born of God behaves as such, he does not practice sin. This is clear in Rom 8:5-14 and ...


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The point is that one cannot be simultaneously justified and sinning: 1Jn_1:6 If we say that we have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we lie, and do not the truth: The author is calling Luther's paradigm of simul iustus et peccator a lie and those who embrace his teaching as "out of step" with "the truth": In describing the new birth ...


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Although they were attributed to the apostle John later in the second century, the author of the three 'Johannine' epistles only refers to himself as the 'elder' or 'presbyter'. This epistle was not intended as an encyclical to the church as a whole, but was addressed by the elder to members of his community, to solve a problem that threatened its ...


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The question asks about idols in the context of 1 John, rather than for a broader opinion about idolatry. And we will find that the author of 1 John has a very specific purpose of mentioning idols at the end of a long epistle that does not otherwise mention idols or pagan ideas. W. Hall Harris III ('3. The Author’s Opponents and Their Teaching in 1 John') ...


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W. Hall Harris III ('3. The Author’s Opponents and Their Teaching in 1 John') says the epistle provides good reason for thinking that a split has taken place in the Johannine community and the author’s opponents now constitute a community of their own. This is most clearly evident in 1 John 2:19: 1 John 2:19: They went out from us, but they were not of ...


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I believe that this verse should be read in the context of John's later letter: 2 John 7–8 (KJV 1900) For many deceivers are entered into the world, who confess not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh. This is a deceiver and an antichrist. Look to yourselves, that we lose not those things which we have wrought, but that we ...


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When reviewing the BDAG, the authors helpfully include examples. When trying to get a sense of the usage of a word, you may find it helpful to actually review those examples. So, for example, both the BDAG and Thayer's Greek Lexicon cite the following two verses for the BDAG ④ human/ancestral connection, human/mortal nature, earthly descentand Thayer's 2b....


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Like most of the scrolls of the scriptures 1 John's author is anonymous. Nowhere within the scroll does the author says "I, John" or any such thing. However the author claims to have been one of the disciples: KJV 1 John 1:1-2 - modified by me The [Jesus] that was from the beginning [of the gospel], which we have heard, which we have seen with our ...


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Malcolm Coombes ('A Different Approach To The Structure Of 1 John') explains the author's use of structure and other rhetorical amplification techniques, that clearly involved a great deal of thought and planning, inconsistent with leaving an incomplete letter. In spite of its apparent rambling nature it was not written in any sort of hurry. Of course, if ...


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1 John chapters 2-4 could only have been written by a single person, so there is no good reason to see this epistle as written by multiple authors. In spite of tradition, few modern scholars would understand the author to be the apostle John, to whom the 'Johannine' writings were attributed later in the second century. Most scholars believe that 1 John was ...


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The answer surprises many, because scholarship of First John is what you might call a niche pursuit, so that the conclusions of critical scholars have not become well known. Because we often try to read 1 John in terms of modern faith concepts, it seems to be a confusing epistle with no easy answers to questions like this. W. Hall Harris III ('3. The Author’...


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1 John makes numerous references to love, especially in chapters 2 and 4, so much so that you could be forgiven for believing it is an epistle about love. However, New Testament scholars see the epistle quite differently, as a polemic. W. Hall Harris III ('3. The Author’s Opponents and Their Teaching in 1 John') says 1 John 2:19 provides good reason for ...


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W. Hall Harris III ('3. The Author’s Opponents and Their Teaching in 1 John') says 1 John 2:19 provides good reason for thinking that a split has taken place in the Johannine community and the author’s opponents now constitute a community of their own, just as thoroughly committed as the author’s to spreading their understanding of who Jesus is. Burton L. ...


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A difficulty in reading 1 John is that it was not written for a modern audience used to a sequential, literal way of thinking and writing. The 'elder' thinks and writes differently, using metaphors, synonyms and rhetorical structures that are effective if sometimes not quite classical. Malcolm Coombes ('A Different Approach To The Structure Of 1 John') ...


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While some of this chapter is written to "brethren" and "you" in general, the author addresses specific messages to four different groups within the entire audience or community: 12 I write to you, little children (τεκνία), Because your sins are forgiven you for His name’s sake. 13 I write to you, fathers (πατέρες), Because you have known Him who is from ...


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I think it may be reading too much into the text, perhaps, to infer that John is writing to two distinct groups - τεκνία and παιδία. Greek, like English, has synonyms. It would be strange, for example, that in 2:12 he is addressing one group of "little children" and then addressing an entirely different group in the very next verse. I can't find any ...


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In cases where a precise literal translation is important, I look up the passage in the Berean Literal Bible translation in biblehub.com: Anyone having been born of God does not practice sin, because His seed abides in him, and he is not able to continue sinning, because he has been born of God. The Apostle John refers to the behaviour of someone ...


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How can the apostle John say that those who are born again cannot continue in sin, yet the apostle Paul says that some Christians do lead lives of continual sin which grieves the Lord and requires Him to judge them? Actually John does not say "born again", but rather "born of God". Also, the original text does not say "No one ... will continue to ...


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The idols are any thing which is worshiped instead of God. It can even be something which isn't worshiped but takes over your life and you are obsessed with. Little children are God's children (followers) because if God is the father then we are the children of him.



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