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6

I think if you look at the context of the verses in 1 John you will see that he was very much concerned with protecting believers from false teaching and false teachers. He starts out in verse 7 with: "Dear children, do not let anyone lead you astray." It seems to me, here he was trying to help them to identify false teachers, not necessarily to make ...


5

The context supports a causative understanding of the phrase "...we shall be like him, because we shall see him as he is", and the context is crucial to the nuance of correct interpretation too. 3:1See what kind of love the Father has given to us, that we should be called children of God; and so we are. The reason why the world does not know us is that ...


4

Short Answer: Possible? Yes. Probable? No. The "advantages" of Synge's translation First, let's put to rest Synge's claims about the advantages of his translation. Regarding the consistently personal use of φανερόω, this verb does not have a consistently personal use (e.g. Mark 4:22) -- unless he means in this verse, which would be to commit the ...


4

Bibliographic Postscript This is offered as a supplement to Soldarnal's fine answer. Probably the most thorough (one is tempted to say "exhaustive") account of the internal evidence bearing on the question of the common authorship of gJohn and 1 John is found in A.E. Brooke, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Johannine Epistles (Edinburgh, 1912), ...


4

While before the 20th century there was common agreement on common authorship between the Gospel and Epistles of John, there is, as you mention, no such agreement today. At the same time, we are quick to note, however, that John and 1 John share a vocabulary of words and thought forms to such an extent that no one has mounted a serious proposal that they are ...


3

A: To help us answer this question we need to examine both the Greek words from which are translated the terms “darkness”, “in the darkness” and “walk in the darkness”, and also the context in which the Apostle John uses these terms. Confining our focus to the Greek text of John's writings will help us avoid imposing our own preconceptions on what these ...


3

Short Answer: The shift is not only justified, but I believe it is virtually demanded by the context. From a grammatical standpoint either "sins" or "keeps on sinning" could work. (Technical mumbo jumbo: This is because the verb is in the Koine Greek "present tense" which is used for both ongoing action, as well as punctiliar/undefined action, in present ...


2

The Idea in Brief The “sin leading to death” is any sin committed against any congregation of believers who comprise the Body of Christ. In these cases, believers are not to forgive (loosen on earth = loosen in heaven) but instead to hold believers accountable (bind on earth = bind in heaven). Some examples of such sins include, but are not limited to, ...


2

The Idea in Brief If the conscience condemns itself of past sins, the Spirit of God is greater. That is, despite self-condemnation, the Spirit of God is greater in power and might, and therefore provides full reassurance to the human conscience of complete forgiveness of sins. Discussion In this verse, there are variant readings in four places: [Καὶ] ...


2

The Idea in Brief The present active indicative of the main verb points toward habitual sinning with specific emphasis on those unloving behaviors toward ones fellow believers and leaders. In other words, loving behaviors toward fellow believers and leaders are the actual "practice" of those born from God, not vice-versa. Discussion The verse in question ...


1

Short Answer: The word πειθω has the basic sense (in the active voice) of "convince" or "persuade" (cf. Gingrich) and καρδια just means "heart". So literally it would be "convince our heart". However, the reason there is so much debate surrounding the translation of this phrase is not that the terms are unclear, but that there is a bigger theological debate ...


1

This is a very good example of the difference between translation and paraphrase. καρδία is an absolutely ordinary Greek word, part of the core vocabulary of Classical, Koine and Modern Greek. It means “heart”. Of course, in this passage it is used figuratively, but in English too “heart” is used figuratively on a daily basis. Sometimes I have the impression ...


1

Excellent question, Susan. There are different perspectives on this. Some take it that John's own thinking about the epistle changed at this point in his writing, and he began to think of it as a work that would be completed (e.g. Longacre). Others take it that the first set of statements is in regard to what he is presently writing, while the second set is ...


1

The Idea in Brief The images of the word (light) coming from darkness are from the Torah, with particular development in the Book of Deuteronomy. That is, the Word of God comes down from heaven (out of the darkness) and provides life and light to man, so that man may live (walk) in that light. When one rejects that revelation, the result is to walk in ...


1

WHAT DOES DARKNESS REPRESENT IN SCRIPTURE? In Genesis 1:2 & 3, we are confronted with the word "darkness" and with the word "light". To properly understand darkness, we need to know what God implied when He said: "Let there be light". In the previous season we understood this Light to be the sun, but through the Holy Spirit, who opened our ...


1

Amplified bible translation of 1 John 1:6 says that [So] if we say we are partakers together and enjoy fellowship with Him when we live and move and are walking about in darkness, we are [both] speaking falsely and do not live and practice the Truth [which the Gospel presents]. So what i understand that in the three chapters he meant that we need to ...


1

Executive Summary The Greek New Testament in addition to most English translations of the passage treat verses 18-21 as one unit, or one paragraph. John is admonishing his followers in this paragraph to protect themselves from the slavery of sin (idolatry), which otherwise exposes one to direct demonic influence. Discussion In the Hebrew Bible idols were ...


1

What is the “sin that leads to (results in) death”? I think we should start by looking at the actual Greek words John used, next study its counter-part, that is “sin that doesn’t result in death, and finally examine the adjacent and wider contexts of his letter. Once we know what John’s readers knew, then we will know what this death-causing sin is ...



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