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11

Probably for continuity. The translation philosophy of the NKJV version was to essentially follow the original King James Version but update the language. They did realize that there was textual discrepencies. That particular passage included words found in later Greek editions of the text but not in earlier editions. Regarding textual discrepancies of ...


10

I agree with much of what Jon Ericson has said but I think we can get even closer to the meaning of the "sin that leads to death" from the context of 1st John. John is dealing with a division that has occurred in his church (1 John 2:18-19). Some have left, denying that Jesus' had a physical body (1 John 4:1-3). The young men of the congregation ...


9

This is a case where the argument for inauthenticity is quite clear. The Comma Johanneum does not appear in any ancient Greek sources (1 John, like all the other books of the New Testament, was written originally in Greek). The earliest Greek version of 1 John with the Comma Johanneum is from 1516! The extra line was added to some Latin manuscripts ...


6

One way of approaching this question is to first ask "what would each verse have meant in the mind of the original author" taking account of who we believe was/were the human author's intended audience. When taking this approach, we must also take account of the genre of the writing. In brief, Proverbs (at least until some of the later sections) are "of ...


6

It's possible that John is recalling Mark 3:28-30 (ESV) “Truly, I say to you, all sins will be forgiven the children of man, and whatever blasphemies they utter, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin”—for they were saying, “He has an unclean spirit.” The sense in Mark is a bit hard to ...


6

I think if you look at the context of the verses in 1 John you will see that he was very much concerned with protecting believers from false teaching and false teachers. He starts out in verse 7 with: "Dear children, do not let anyone lead you astray." It seems to me, here he was trying to help them to identify false teachers, not necessarily to make ...


5

ἐξ ἡμῶν ἐξῆλθαν ἀλλ’ οὐκ ἦσαν ἐξ ἡμῶν εἰ γὰρ ἐξ ἡμῶν ἦσαν μεμενήκεισαν ἂν μεθ’ ἡμῶν ἀλλ’ ἵνα φανερωθῶσιν ὅτι οὐκ εἰσὶν πάντες ἐξ ἡμῶν Direct, wooden, stilted Interpretation: From us they went out but/and not they were from us for if from us they were they had remained with us but that they may have been revealed that not ...


4

νόμος in Paul is almost always Mosaic Law (though probably not in Romans 7 when he finds within himself a "law"). However, not all authors use the same words the same way. Even from above we can see that authors don't even use the same word the same way, though they may exhibit patterns. So, to hold John up to the requirement of using νόμος to refer to ...


4

According to 2 John 7, there was the widespread belief that Jesus had only "appeared" and therefore did not come in the flesh -- so-called incipient Gnosticism. 2 John 1:7 (NASB) For many deceivers have gone out into the world, those who do not acknowledge Jesus Christ as coming in the flesh. This is the deceiver and the antichrist. So in the epistle ...


4

While before the 20th century there was common agreement on common authorship between the Gospel and Epistles of John, there is, as you mention, no such agreement today. At the same time, we are quick to note, however, that John and 1 John share a vocabulary of words and thought forms to such an extent that no one has mounted a serious proposal that they are ...


4

Bibliographic Postscript This is offered as a supplement to Soldarnal's fine answer. Probably the most thorough (one is tempted to say "exhaustive") account of the internal evidence bearing on the question of the common authorship of gJohn and 1 John is found in A.E. Brooke, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Johannine Epistles (Edinburgh, 1912), ...


3

From the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia's article on Gnosticism, comes the following, which I've highlighted and modified here and there: In the First Epistle of John there is a distinct polemical purpose. There is no book of the New Testament which is more purposeful in its attack of error. There is "the spirit of error" (1 John 4:6), opposing ...


3

At first glance it does seem odd that John would leave this command dangling on the end of his letter. Why would he suddenly mention idols and not say anything more on the subject when he hasn't spoken about idols at all his letter. One explanation is that John had more to say about idol worship but his letter as it now stands is unfinished. But this ...


3

Forgive me for quoting extensively from The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament. It's the only book I've found in more than 15 years of studying the writings of John which so clearly gets the water and blood right. The Standard View: Water and Blood as Baptism and Death It is tempting to suppose that the reference to water in ...


3

To me, the verse turns on this conditional: if they had been of us, (a) they would have remained with us (b) (b) is tricky because of the word translated "remained" (μένω) which is particularly used in the writings attributed to John: Mat(3) Mar(2) Luk(6) Jhn(33) Act(12) Rom(1) 1Cr(8) 2Cr(3) Phl(1) 1Ti(1) 2Ti(3) Hbr(6) 1Pe(2) 1Jo(18) ...


3

A: To help us answer this question we need to examine both the Greek words from which are translated the terms “darkness”, “in the darkness” and “walk in the darkness”, and also the context in which the Apostle John uses these terms. Confining our focus to the Greek text of John's writings will help us avoid imposing our own preconceptions on what these ...


3

Short Answer: The shift is not only justified, but I believe it is virtually demanded by the context. From a grammatical standpoint either "sins" or "keeps on sinning" could work. (Technical mumbo jumbo: This is because the verb is in the Koine Greek "present tense" which is used for both ongoing action, as well as punctiliar/undefined action, in present ...


2

There are a whole lot of sins enumerated where the perpetrator was to be put to death. They are all summarized in this verse: Deuteronomy 30:19 I call heaven and earth to record this day against you, that I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing: therefore choose life, that both thou and thy seed may live: The opposite choice ...


2

I would suggest that, based on John's style in 1 John, 2:18 starts a new pericope where 12-14 are part of the immediately preceding pericope. Where the age divisions in 12-14 could be different groups within the church (probably Ephesus), in verse 18 I see John gently asserting his eldership (not in a rude, authoritarian way). "Children" (verse 18) is a ...


2

Let's quote the passage from a more-modern English translation: There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear. For fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not been perfected in love. We love because he first loved us. If anyone says, “I love God,” and hates his brother, he is a liar; for he who does not love his brother whom he ...


2

Since he is using the 'I' without further reference, he is the author. (No one else is being named explicitly who could be co-author.) The 'we' in the beginning therefore can only be understood as standing for the group of witnessing disciples (apostles). Regarding witness the commonness (plural) of the experience is important (as not being just an ...


2

I believe this verse has nothing to do with the security of the believer. It has been misunderstood and misapplied for too long. John was simply referring to the problem of false teachers that went out from the Jerusalem church that Luke had documented (see Acts 15:24). They were antichrists (2:18), had denied the Father and the Son (2:22), and were trying ...


2

As Joseph noted, is it certainly that something like a proto-Gnosticism in view, although recent scholarship has pushed back the dates of Gnosticism considerably later than was earlier assumed. Still, ideas start somewhere, and we seem to be seeing evidence in 1 John of at least a sort of incipient Gnosticism sufficient to deny the full reality of the ...


2

John 1:12 ὅσοι δὲ ἔλαβον αὐτόν ἔδωκεν αὐτοῖς ἐξουσίαν τέκνα θεοῦ γενέσθαι τοῖς πιστεύουσιν εἰς τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ But as many as received him, to those who believe in his name, he gave them power to become sons of God, Thayer1 describes the sense of ἐξουσίαν (exousian) in this verse as "physical and mental power; the ability or strength with which one ...


2

The Idea in Brief The “sin leading to death” is any sin committed against any congregation of believers who comprise the Body of Christ. In these cases, believers are not to forgive (loosen on earth = loosen in heaven) but instead to hold believers accountable (bind on earth = bind in heaven). Some examples of such sins include, but are not limited to, ...


1

WHAT DOES DARKNESS REPRESENT IN SCRIPTURE? In Genesis 1:2 & 3, we are confronted with the word "darkness" and with the word "light". To properly understand darkness, we need to know what God implied when He said: "Let there be light". In the previous season we understood this Light to be the sun, but through the Holy Spirit, who opened our ...


1

Amplified bible translation of 1 John 1:6 says that [So] if we say we are partakers together and enjoy fellowship with Him when we live and move and are walking about in darkness, we are [both] speaking falsely and do not live and practice the Truth [which the Gospel presents]. So what i understand that in the three chapters he meant that we need to ...


1

Executive Summary The Greek New Testament in addition to most English translations of the passage treat verses 18-21 as one unit, or one paragraph. John is admonishing his followers in this paragraph to protect themselves from the slavery of sin (idolatry), which otherwise exposes one to direct demonic influence. Discussion In the Hebrew Bible idols were ...


1

It's not a matter of either/or but both/and. Spiritual idolatry, as you put it, and physical idolatry, as I put it, are very often--if not always--conjoined, in more ways than one. In our post-modern world, it's rare for a person to bow down to an idol that is literally made of wood and stone and metal. The adherents to the Canaanite religions certainly ...


1

Regarding the translation of these words in John 20 and 1Peter 3: Neither may nor might is intended or given in the Greek. The Apostles are trusting, not writing laissez-faire. RE: John 20:31 The writing down (from the author´s perspective) just had happened, whereas our (the readers´) trusting and therefore our living was (and is) yet to come. The simple ...



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