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19

@Richard offered a decent but limited exegetical understanding of the text (he emphasized the definition of the verb but not the grammar behind it), albeit with a strong complementarian doctrinal bias. @Soldernal offered a good contextual study of the text, and made it clear that Paul permits women to speak elsewhere which is helpful to this discussion ...


14

The word πορνεία is a difficult one to translate because it covers a wide range of sexual immorality. It has to be interpreted in context. Of the examples that you provide, 1 Corinthians 7:2 yields the strongest argument that pre-marital sex is included in Paul's use of the word πορνεία. 1 Corinthians 5:1 gives us a good example of the importance of ...


14

It is apparently a reference to Numbers 25:1-9. The difficulty with this answer, however, is that the number referred to in that passage is actually 24 ,000 (even in the Septuagint: "τεσσαρες και εικοσι χιλιαδες"). I don't have an explanation for this apparent discrepancy. Of course, what Paul says is, in fact, "true" (if 24K died, it is also true that 23K ...


11

This passage is not easy to understand, not least because certain interpretations offend many modern sensibilities. There are some (relatively minor) issues of textual criticism and of translation. There are some difficult referents, like "law" in verse 34. Moreover, the "crystal clear" line of total silence for women is difficult to adopt because in 1 ...


10

Looking at the verse, we can see that the command is crystal clear for woman to not speak in church. In fact, it mentions this four times in four different ways: The women are to keep silent they are not permitted to speak let them ask their own husbands at home it is improper for a woman to speak in church To further illustrate the point of silence, ...


9

Did others than the 11 Apostles see the risen Jesus? There is at least one other record that says a group consisting of more than the apostles saw Jesus after his resurrection. Luke 24:33-37 (ESV quoted): And they rose that same hour and returned to Jerusalem. And they found the eleven and those who were with them gathered together, saying, "The Lord ...


9

My comments below cover the entire section, verses 2-16. The NET Bible includes a number of translator notes on this passage that are helpful. In verse 3 Paul describes a hierarchy of authority as follows: God (the Father) Christ Man - ἀνήρ (Strongs G435) - "man"; male (adult?); husband Woman - γυνή (Strongs G1135) - "woman"; female (adult?), regardless ...


9

If there is a contradiction at all between Paul's tradition and the tradition of the Gospel writers, it can be resolved as a text critical issue here in 1 Corinthians 11:24. Most of the early manuscripts simply have Τοῦτό μού ἐστιν τὸ σῶμα τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν - "This is my body, which is for you." The short phrase τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν also appears in 2 Corinthians 9:3, ...


9

History of Interpretation άγγελοι in the human sense of "messenger." Some contextual support (10:32, 14:23) to view these "messengers" as outsiders or envoys from other churches. Essentially Paul is hoping to ensure that the Corinthian church does not embarrass themselves. The angels are "guardians of the created order." Paul seems to be drawing on the ...


8

The King James Version uses "charity" throughout the "Love Passage": 1 Corinthians 13:4-7 (KJV) 4 Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, 5 Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; 6 Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the ...


8

I would love to make a long, boring answer, but this is basic Greek and can be referenced in any Greek grammar. πᾶς ἀνὴρ - "every man" πᾶσα δὲ γυνὴ - "but every woman" δέ is what grammarians call a "postpositive" and never comes first in a Greek clause, although it does come first in the English translation of the Greek clause. That is why it is located ...


7

The answer to this question is twofold. Holman Bible Dictionary has an article that explains how quotations are signified in the New Testament. The most common way to identify quotations in the new testament is by wording (especially verbage) that indicates something has been said or written elsewhere or earlier. Quotations From the Scripture/Word: “as ...


7

Short Answer: Paul was not in any way endorsing their action. On the contrary, Paul was bringing this up as evidence of their absurdity. The Corinthians were denying that the dead would be raised... but then they were turning around and getting baptized for them! His point is that they are being ridiculous. Context: The flow of the passage First, Paul ...


7

I am going to attempt to walk through the major literature in this discussion, which will be a lot of back and forth. I have linked to all the major works referenced, however not all of the articles and books are freely available online (some must be purchased). Both Gordon D. Fee and Philip B. Payne are notable scholars who believe that 1 Corinthians ...


7

The word used for broken in 1 Corinthians 11:24 is κλάω, which according to Strong's is used specifically the breaking of bread, while in John 19:36, συντρίβω (shatter, break in pieces) is used. The Interpreter's Bible, when commenting on 1 Corinthians 11:24 says of the use of broken: This may be an interpretive gloss, as most modern editors of the ...


7

μίαν σαββάτων μίαν is feminine-gendered. σαββάτων is neuter-gendered. The English translation cannot be "one of the Sabbaths" because μίαν does not agree in gender with σαββάτων. Simple as that. It's grammatically impossible. Here is the first of several PDF's that I will post on the subject. This first one proves that the Hebrew word שַׁבַּת (shabbat), ...


7

Paul, in context, leaves no doubt about his monotheism. 1 Cor 8 deals with food offered to idols. As such, we expect the text to deal with "so-called gods". Moreover, I find it interesting that you chose not to include v4 in your quote: 4 Therefore concerning the eating of things offered to idols, we know that an idol is nothing in the world, and ...


6

Foundational considerations in approaching this passage: The theology of marriage that is derived from this passage must jive with the theology of marriage in the rest of Scripture. We have from other places, including Paul's own writing, a beautiful view of marriage as a prelapsarian blessing which is meant to reflect Christ and the church. Thus it would ...


6

I have not found any commentators who directly mention that the Corinthians rejected Paul's recommendations or teaching, rather only that they rejected his style. Colin Kruse in the Tyndale NT Commentaries says: In this central section of the letter Paul appeals to the Corinthians to be reconciled to God and open their hearts to their apostle. He clears ...


6

Love in the New Testament: φιλέω, Strong's 5368, phileó: this family of words means to show warm affection in intimate friendship, or brotherly love φιλόστοργος, Strong's 5387, philostorgos: (technically in the phileó family) that special affection shared betwee members of God's family (only used in Romans 12:10) ἀγάπη, Strong's 26, agape: the agape ...


6

Abstract Paul can't be read to support a non-physical resurrection, in this passage or any other, unless you take his words out of context. N. T. Wright is certainly the person to ask on the topic and he neatly summarizes the argument in an article addressing four reviews of his The Resurrection of the Son of God: [Michael] Goulder, by contrast, ...


6

The Hosea and Jonah references are good and quite valid, but I think I would approach this one a bit differently. But maybe it is just a matter of emphasis. Is the important point here that Jesus was raised or that he was raised after three days. I tend to think the former. If you agree, then what I'm about to say might make some sense :) If we talk general ...


6

Short Answer: Paul wanted the Corinthians to address blatant immorality in the congregation, and to be able to work through legal disputes within the context of the Church, but he didn't want them going around criticizing people and fault-finding. Words have a semantic range, so it is always important to look at what the author was attempting to communicate ...


6

No, these verses don't promote deception for the sake of mission. (1) 1 Corinthians 9:20-21 is set in the context of Paul defending his austere life-style as a counter-indicator of his apostleship. As one of many signs of his self-abnegation, he claims to subordinate even his own identity to those to whom he speaks. The contrast does not stop with ...


5

Paul seems to be very careful at the beginning of I Corinthians 7 in his statements, hedging them so that they are not taken as absolutes, e.g. vv. 1-2 and 8-9 with "it is good [...] but", and v.6 with "by way of concession, not of command", and in the middle of the chapter when he's talking about divorce he does clearly separate his "I say, not the Lord" ...


5

The KJV does not teach that preaching is foolish. The use of the word "foolish(ness)" here found in its context clears up the confusion. In verse 18 we read that the "preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness." The text isn't saying that it's actually foolishness, but that it is perceived to be this way by certain individuals. Verse 23 ...


5

I believe Paul used the phrase "Baptism for the dead" vs 29, in the context of a spiritual war. I think it means those who "stand in the gap" for (or in the place of) fallen Christian brothers and sisters. I know that sounds a bit odd so let me explain. The Apostle Paul frequently used military terms to describe the Christian's ongoing spiritual battles ...


5

It's quite possible that by "the greater gifts" he means faith, hope, and love, which he discusses next, especially since he ends that discussion with the same word "greatest". Regardless, in chapter 14, he clearly considers prophesy "greater" (verse 5) than tongues. Therefore, one must modify one's understanding of chapter 12, from "all the functions are ...


5

The confusion with the translation lies in this word: hypōpiazō. If we look at Strong's Concordance for this, we see the following definition: Strongs G5299 to beat black and blue, to smite so as to cause bruises and livid spots like a boxer one buffets his body, handle it roughly, discipline by hardships metaph. to give one ...


5

How many resurrections are there? The immediate referent of "first resurrection" is not, "The rest of the dead did not come to life until the thousand years were ended." Instead it is those that came to life and reigned with Christ for a thousand years. This is made clear by the fact that the author restates that those who participate in the first ...



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