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16

Joseph's sons were Ephraim and Manasseh, Gen. 41:51 Joseph called the name of the firstborn Manasseh: “For God has made me forget all my toil and all my father’s house.” Gen. 41:52 And the name of the second he called Ephraim: “For God has caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction.” These became, in a sense, Jacob's sons: Gen. ...


11

This is just by way of postscript and supplement to a (good!) answer already provided. The lists of tribes given in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament typically are as @Niobius describes: Joseph's sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, replace both Joseph and Levi, most obviously in the tribal settlements during the "conquests" of Joshua/Judges. This is also how they ...


11

Jack Douglas already does a good job of handling the possibility of concurrent causes, so I won't repeat his ideas on the first question. However, I think more can be said in answer to your second question. What's wrong with taking a census? We see in 1 Chronicles 21:3 that what's wrong is not a matter of procedure. The act of taking a census is one that ...


8

And what's wrong with taking a census anyway? I don't believe we are told anywhere that taking a census is wrong. In fact, the Midrash to Numbers 1:1 speaks of 10 censuses of the Jewish people: When they went down to Egypt (Ex. 12:7); When they left Egypt (Ex. 32:28); At the beginning of the Book of Numbers (Num. 1:1); After the report ...


7

Context(s) The context for 1 Chronicles 16:22 is, obviously, 1 Chronicles 16. This is the Chronicler's account of David's finally successful efforts to bring the Ark to Jerusalem, expanded over the parallel version in 2 Samuel 6. One of the most striking differences is that the Chronicler supplies the song that was sung as the Ark processed into Jerusalem. ...


6

This should not be taken as a prophecy but as a lesson on true faith. If you read before this passage, you see that Jesus has been having issues with the religious leaders. Over and over they fail to believe, or more specifically, fail to recognize who he is. Now, go back to the Hebrew scriptures. Jonah was pretty cool, but you would really only expect ...


5

Wiersbe makes an important point that: When he confesses his sins of adultery and murder, David said, "I have sinned"; but when he confessed his sin of numbering the people, he said, "I have sinned greatly" (italics mine).1 But a balanced explanation makes sure to note that neither version of the episode (2 Samuel 24, or 1 Chronicles 21) actually tells ...


4

What an excellent question! Aaron had four sons: two died an early death with no survivors, and the other two sons survived:-- Eleazar and Ithamar. Thus the Levites who served as priests at the time of David are all descended from one of these two priestly lines. In the Hebrew Bible, when we see the Ahimelech(father)/Abiathar(son) team, these two are the ...


4

That's an interesting question. Jabez isn't mentioned anywhere else, he just appears, prays, and disappears again. I think that given the tone of this interjection, the chronicler's point was theological in nature. This fits with the overall theme of 1-2 Chronicles, which was written after the Jew's return from exile to remind them of God's covenant ...


3

I did a little google search and found that there is also a mention of a Jozabad in 1 Chronicles 12:4 and it appears that this is one of the Benjamite archers who joined David at Ziklag and in 1 Chronicles 12:20 it(my source) only gives a definition for one of them (I assume the other Jozabad), a chief of the tribe of Manasseh. I looked at other versions ...


2

While Joseph's answer has much to commend it, I feel it is headed in the wrong direction. I don't think there is a need to suppose two sets of Abiathars and Ahimelechs where one is father-son and the other vice versa. First, 1 Kings 2:26-27 is clear that it was indeed the so-called "good" Abiathar it's talking about since verse 27 notes that his life was ...


2

Sorry to come in late here, but I don't see the ancient Jewish sources cited in any of the answers. There are two issues here: (1) who instigated David to conduct a census and (2) was the sin that David had a census taken, or the way he had it done? First, let's look at the verse in 2 Samuel 24. Translations differ on a key point -- who was it that ...


2

The Idea in Brief The last section of Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar indicates that this specific verse contains aposiopesis, which provides for the awkward structure of the verse. That is, Jabez promises that the "if the Lord does (this and that) and..." and yet nonetheless the passage does NOT include any reference to what Jabez did in response to his vows. In ...


2

The evidence, and the consensus of critical scholars, is that the Deuteronomic History (Joshua, Judges, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings and 2 Kings), written before the Babylonian Exile, was the main source for the Book of Chronicles (now 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles), but that the author of Chronicles probably had other material available as well. Chronicles ...


1

Assyria seized control of all of Aram (Syria) and the northern kingdom of Israel in a single military operation during the Syro-Ephraimite War, c.734-732 BCE. Only the highland region of Ephraim (Samaria) survived the war relatively untrampled. It retained the name 'Israel', though only for a decade until it too was destroyed. Current scholarship suggests ...



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