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The Bible uses both "God of ...Jacob" and "God of Israel". How often does it say each version? Is there a place I can look up the actual references?

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closed as off-topic by maj nem ɪz dæn Jun 20 at 15:55

  • This question does not appear to be about the analysis of biblical text within the scope defined in the help center.
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Is the question in the title the same one as in the body? –  Kazark Dec 21 '12 at 2:54
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If the question is the one in the body, dup: hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/q/952/208 –  Gone Quiet Dec 21 '12 at 3:29
    
Sorry, the question is in the title and I worded it badly. I will edit it now. –  Sam Dec 23 '12 at 18:15
    
This seems to be two questions, "why?" and "how do I look up references?". The single answer (at this writing) addresses the latter only. Should this be split into two questions? –  Gone Quiet May 14 '13 at 13:26
    
These types of questions are off topic as per this meta discussion. –  maj nem ɪz dæn Jun 20 at 15:55

1 Answer 1

There are many ways to determine the quantity of occurrences of a particular phrase in the Bible. The way I often do it is:

  1. Go to www.blueletterbible.org.
  2. You will see a box under "Bible Dictionary/ Search."
  3. Within quotes, type in the word or phrase you would like to search for. For example: "God of Israel." This will yield results for that exact phrase.
  4. For a less specific search, you can remove the quotes.

The search for "God of Israel" under the "Primary Results" tab yielded: "God of Israel" occurs 203 times in 201 verses in the KJV.

Hope that helps.

I know this is only a partial answer, but doing this in a comment would not have proved beneficial.

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